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Old 10-15-2012, 01:55 PM
 
162 posts, read 212,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
Price and the income to afford it will determine part of this choice. With serious money, one will have more options.

Somewhere in the middle might be a town such as Crestone. Not sure about the schooling, and it is remote, but surely low crime, a beautiful setting, and by and large anything but self-centered people. In fact, it is one of the most spiritual places in Colorado, being the chosen home of any number of different religious orders.

Choose one of the resort areas, such as Aspen or Breckenridge, and one will have not only high expense, and scenery, but also LOTS of the self-centered and shallow. It can be fun, but . . .

There are certainly other options. One might look to northwest Colorado, being by and large more cowboy for those so attuned.

Thus possibly back to the San Luis Valley. Aside from Crestone, there are towns such as Monte Vista; it is not as scenic, but near a lot of it, and one of the more down to earth places in the state. Or further to the west of that, and at the very edge of the mountains, South Fork, being picturesque but more popular with tourists. Just within that one valley there are a number of towns with different atmospheres. As microcosm it could serve as a good primer for the variances across this greater state. In what one truly wants?

Some of that will be expensive, although working remotely provides more options.
Looking them up right now. =}
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Old 10-15-2012, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Bend, OR
3,296 posts, read 8,207,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ny1964 View Post
I apologize for not adding in the key details of what i'm looking for. I'll start with the price range. I have a max budget of 950k and could possibly stretch that to 1m, not sure what that will get me, but I hope something decent. A medium sized town, not overwhelmingly crowded, but not totally isolated either. Amenities wise, There does not need to be a whole lot to do that's not really a factor but it would be a bonus. An active town would be nice. Climate, would like four seasons, with allot of snow during wintertime. My partner also works from home so employment and commute are not a factor. A nice area with nice people, not any of the "rich and snobby" towns I hear of.
A budget like this will certainly be good when looking at areas west of Denver, especially if considering some of the ski resort towns. One thing to consider, if you are both working remotely, is Internet access. Many mountain locations still have pretty bad options. I just read a post on this forum not too long ago about Park County (which is beautiful and may have what you are looking for except for good Internet).

I would consider areas that still have somewhat of a population, as these will probably have the best Internet options as well. Summit Co. is nice, if you can handle living at high elevation where most seasons are pretty short, with the exception of winter. Evergreen might be a good option for you as well.

Personally, if I had your budget and job situation, I would be looking at Western Colorado. I love Durango, Telluride, Crested Butte, Pagosa Springs, and the like. Of course, everyone with money and remote jobs have also moved into those areas. Snobbery does exist, in all areas of Colorado, but unless you seek it out, you can usually deal.

IDunn's suggestion of Crestone is certainly remote, but I would seriously look into Internet there. Not sure what it's like.
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Old 10-15-2012, 04:21 PM
 
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Your price range is such that there would be plenty of choices away from the resort towns IF your assets or income will support a property of that price on a sustained basis. If you don't want the "snobby" attitude, then you can forget all of the Colorado resort towns--they all have that vibe at one level or another. West of the Front Range that really limits your choices to the west central valleys (Grand Junction, Delta, Montrose) that have more of a desert climate, the San Luis Valley which has a very cold desert climate, Craig and Meeker in northwest Colorado that are energy boom/bust towns, and a few very small agricultural towns here and there such as Dove Creek.

You may find all of those places quite a culture shock if you are from a metro area--especially from "back East." Some of the towns can be pretty "rough around the edges" and isolation and distance from metro areas can be very daunting for those not used to the Rocky Mountain West. It is a different paradigm. A lot of "transplants" have tolerated that because cheap airfares, etc. have made frequent "escapes" for those people to the places they came from relatively practical, but it is my absolute belief that those days are coming to a close. So, one has to ask, "How well am I going to like it here if I can only afford to leave once or twice a year, at most?" A lot of people who have transplanted here couldn't stand it if that was the reality, and I think that is exactly the reality that is coming.

As I have posted ad nauseum, Colorado also has serious festering fiscal problems, thanks to rigid Constitutional provisions that are nearly impossible to change, that are and will very negatively affect public schools, and other state and local public services going forward. This IS NOT a state that I would choose for residency if I had school-age children, especially younger one that will be in the system for awhile.

You might also look at some of the non-resort towns in Wyoming. There are more "real" small towns in Wyoming without all the resort snobbery, etc. than are found in Colorado. Wyoming is also in much better fiscal shape than is Colorado, and will likely stay that way. The challenges in Wyoming are the isolation, long distances, and the rigorous climate found in many places.
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Old 10-15-2012, 06:41 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,844,180 times
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Wink In relation to what

Access to goods and services can be more important than first suspected.

In the example I suggested, Crestone, the nearest town of any size is Alamosa, and that with roughly an hour's drive, one way. Alamosa is the regional shopping center for the San Luis Valley; smaller towns may have very limited services, and even those larger but small grocers, perhaps a few restaurants, and the odd bank or what not. For daily wants Alamosa would more than do. However if shopping for major appliances, or in general wanting a large mall and related shops one expects in a metro area, then a long drive is required. From the SLV, that means to the Front Range, with Pueblo and Colorado Springs being the first towns of any size, or perhaps more practically south to Albuquerque, NM. Places such as Taos (being fairly close) and Santa Fe, NM can be pleasant to visit, with many of the amenities a tourist might like, but even Santa Fe is not all that large.

This is one reason so many live along the Front Range, or in any event within the mountains relatively near this metro area. It is possible to be and feel fairly removed from all else, and yet within an hour or well less be in Boulder or even Denver. For community, there are also some smaller towns scattered about on the east side of the divide, many with decent access to the plains. Something to consider, because if locating just to the west of these mountains, say in North Park, it is a whole different enchilada insofar as access to such services is concerned. From a map Winter Park and those communities might appear fairly close to Denver, but there is the little matter of Berthoud Pass (elevation: 11,307 feet) to cross before reaching I-70. The Eisenhower Tunnel on I-70 into Summit County is high also, but aside from sometimes heavy traffic that is still an easier route. With decent conditions, it is roughly an hour from Summit County into Denver. So one could be very much in the high country, but still with decent access to the metro areas, not to mention all the many services offered locally due the high number of tourists.

Durango, on the other hand, is about the only game in town in southwest Colorado, being the regional shopping center. As a town it is large enough to offer most anything one might want on a daily basis. If not satisfied with what is there, then there is similarly sized Farmington, NM roughly an hour south; beyond that, think Albuquerque, NM or Denver. Albuquerque is definitely the easier drive on a fairly empty four-lane US 550 (and about four hours, one way).

One might consider. Some would never feel comfortable outside of a city or suburbia to begin with. But many more possibly little more at ease if unable to access the multiplex cinema, hairdresser, restaurant of choice, etc., without much trouble. If none of that is a practical option without going on a multi-hour safari, then one may realize what they've heretofore taken for granted. Or just if the toilet springs a leak, and the local hardware store (assuming there is one) may or not have that desired. As for tradesmen one may wish to employ, not so much a question of the many one can have vie for their business if in the city, but the one or two (possibly) of decent or questionable skill and repute that may be persuaded to visit in the middle of nowhere.

Jamestown might even be smaller than Lake City, with Lake City offering more services, but one huge difference is that it is a long drive to anywhere from Lake City, and eventually only the small regional town of Gunnison (maybe Montrose), but far less of an excursion from Jamestown into Boulder or Longmont.
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Old 10-15-2012, 08:42 PM
 
162 posts, read 212,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
Access to goods and services can be more important than first suspected.

In the example I suggested, Crestone, the nearest town of any size is Alamosa, and that with roughly an hour's drive, one way. Alamosa is the regional shopping center for the San Luis Valley; smaller towns may have very limited services, and even those larger but small grocers, perhaps a few restaurants, and the odd bank or what not. For daily wants Alamosa would more than do. However if shopping for major appliances, or in general wanting a large mall and related shops one expects in a metro area, then a long drive is required. From the SLV, that means to the Front Range, with Pueblo and Colorado Springs being the first towns of any size, or perhaps more practically south to Albuquerque, NM. Places such as Taos (being fairly close) and Santa Fe, NM can be pleasant to visit, with many of the amenities a tourist might like, but even Santa Fe is not all that large.

This is one reason so many live along the Front Range, or in any event within the mountains relatively near this metro area. It is possible to be and feel fairly removed from all else, and yet within an hour or well less be in Boulder or even Denver. For community, there are also some smaller towns scattered about on the east side of the divide, many with decent access to the plains. Something to consider, because if locating just to the west of these mountains, say in North Park, it is a whole different enchilada insofar as access to such services is concerned. From a map Winter Park and those communities might appear fairly close to Denver, but there is the little matter of Berthoud Pass (elevation: 11,307 feet) to cross before reaching I-70. The Eisenhower Tunnel on I-70 into Summit County is high also, but aside from sometimes heavy traffic that is still an easier route. With decent conditions, it is roughly an hour from Summit County into Denver. So one could be very much in the high country, but still with decent access to the metro areas, not to mention all the many services offered locally due the high number of tourists.

Durango, on the other hand, is about the only game in town in southwest Colorado, being the regional shopping center. As a town it is large enough to offer most anything one might want on a daily basis. If not satisfied with what is there, then there is similarly sized Farmington, NM roughly an hour south; beyond that, think Albuquerque, NM or Denver. Albuquerque is definitely the easier drive on a fairly empty four-lane US 550 (and about four hours, one way).

One might consider. Some would never feel comfortable outside of a city or suburbia to begin with. But many more possibly little more at ease if unable to access the multiplex cinema, hairdresser, restaurant of choice, etc., without much trouble. If none of that is a practical option without going on a multi-hour safari, then one may realize what they've heretofore taken for granted. Or just if the toilet springs a leak, and the local hardware store (assuming there is one) may or not have that desired. As for tradesmen one may wish to employ, not so much a question of the many one can have vie for their business if in the city, but the one or two (possibly) of decent or questionable skill and repute that may be persuaded to visit in the middle of nowhere.

Jamestown might even be smaller than Lake City, with Lake City offering more services, but one huge difference is that it is a long drive to anywhere from Lake City, and eventually only the small regional town of Gunnison (maybe Montrose), but far less of an excursion from Jamestown into Boulder or Longmont.
Hmm, I looked up Crestone, and not to sure about it. The population is only 110 and there really isn't any housing options. I'm not to sure about Alomasa. I would prefer to be closer to I70. Summit county seems like a great option. So I guess the Breckenridge area. I just wonder what the commute would be like from Breckenridge to Denver on I70 in the wintertime. Jamestown doesn't look great in the scenery department. Looked it up and doesn't look like much to see. Lake city seems very much "isolated". Hmmm.
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Old 10-15-2012, 09:14 PM
 
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I wouldn't live in Summit County if I had all the money in the world. Classic "resort ghetto."
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Old 10-15-2012, 09:22 PM
 
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Wink As example and Breckenridge

Jamestown and Lake City are only provided as example of how a small town can still have decent access to a metro area, or not.

Crestone would have housing options, if limited for any rental. There are some homes in town proper, and then, somewhat strangely for a town its size, a larger suburban area just to its south. Due the isolation, even with financial means it would not be the place for most; surely of most interest to those appreciating its quite unique vibe.

Breckenridge is a typical Colorado ski town, and a major one at that, even if the town itself is not all that large. With a lot of faux Victorian architecture, well maintained, it is an attractive town within a beautiful mountain setting. Expect a good number of tourists, save less in the shoulder seasons of autumn and spring, with most come winter for skiing. If one can overlook some of the downsides that come with that, it could be a fine home. It would be the type of place where $1m will buy something decent, but at a compromise in space and so forth compared to other markets, and not even begin to touch the upper echelon of properties. If with an interest in skiing, it would be advisable to aim for a residence located for ski out/in; most are not so situated, even very expensive places, and often in the trees without much of a view.

One shouldn't think in terms of a "commute" from Breckenridge to Denver. The drive between the two—on occasion—can be fine. Problems arise, particularly in the winter, during peak travel periods, such as on some weekends and during holidays. If able to bide one's time and skirt this, then the trip even in winter could be perfectly pleasant. Do bear in mind, as well, that if but a short distance between Breckenridge and Frisco on CO 9, there is a fair amount of traffic on that road. Breckenridge would have most anything one might want on a daily basis, and if residing there one might want to spend most of their time doing so. Otherwise, driving in that area at times can be kind of metro.
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Old 10-15-2012, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Bend, OR
3,296 posts, read 8,207,692 times
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I think again, this point to the question, what are you looking for in a town? Do you need access to bigger city or airport for your work? Is that why the question about the commute? Somewhere west of Denver is a large area, with about 2/3rds (roughly) of the state west of Denver. What is your idea of a medium sized town? This differs for many people, especially if you are coming from a big metropolitan area. What do you consider remote?

I would suggest you plan a trip out to Colorado to get a feel for the state first. It seems like this would be a logical step (especially considering your housing budget) and help you to narrow down the vast space "west of Denver."
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Old 10-15-2012, 09:50 PM
 
Location: On the sunny side of a mountain
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The commute from Breck to Denver in the winter is more often a nightmare than pleasant. You really should come visit the area in the winter, distances are much farther out here due to topography, weather can be severe and normal amenities that you are used to may not be available.

I would really look at Evergreen and Conifer for scenic places to live that are closer to Denver.
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Old 01-12-2013, 03:00 AM
 
Location: Evergreen
393 posts, read 558,692 times
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Default Any Luck?

Just saw your post and was wondering if you had a chance to visit CO and feel out some of the places that you'd like to live or if you've already pulled the trigger and moved here?
If you're still searching, have you researched Evergreen, Conifer, Morrison, Genesee, or Golden? All of those areas are within 30-40 minutes of downtown Denver and they are west of the city in the foothills. Great schools (Jefferson Co.), family friendly and low crime. Hope your search is going well. We moved here with our kids just over 4 years ago from NYC and love it...have never looked back!
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