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Old 10-16-2012, 05:59 AM
 
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Hey all,

I just had a curious question for people around the rest of the state of Colorado. Fort Collins people, Boulder people, Colorado Springs people, mountain people, small-town people, Grand Junction people, Durango people, what do you think of Denver?

Do you like visiting? Would you visit a lot? Would you live there? Do you like where you live better than Denver? Do you dislike anything about Denver? Inquiring Denverite is just curious to know.
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Colorado
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I like it for the museums and shopping. I wish our art museum had more in its collection which I find rather superficial, but it does have fantastic visiting exhibits. I don't know much about eating out in Denver but I enjoy visiting City Park and the Botanic Gardens for a good stroll. I wish I knew more of the neighbourhoods and where the artsy funky areas are. If you guys could fix the traffic issue and stop digging up I-25 that'd be cool.
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
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I've traveled around CO quite a bit, and I don't know if CO Springs, Ft. Collins, Boulder, etc.. are really a big deal since they are sizable cities also, it's more like mountain towns/small towns VS Denver.

From what I've seen a lot of people in the small towns, especially the farther out you go don't like Denver at all. It's kinda the big nasty city which draws people from California and other areas that they see as invading Colorado.

I'm sure the same is true in a lot of other areas as well, I'm sure some rural farmers in IL hate Chicago, etc..
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Old 10-16-2012, 10:33 AM
 
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Overall Denver is an ok city, but the mountains are infinitely better and not even comparable.

Sent from my AT&T Samsung Galaxy Note
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Old 10-16-2012, 11:00 AM
 
Location: The 719
13,730 posts, read 21,553,368 times
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I lived in Denver for about 15 years to go to college and try and eek out a career. If it wasn't for family moving away I'd probably still live there.

In my mind, Denver is everything north of Castle Rock and south of Longmont, from E470 to Golden or Morrison.

To me, Colorado Springs is just a parking lot for commuters to/from Denver.

I just got back from a vacation to Atlanta (to see my brother) and the Smoky Mountains and Denver traffic is worse.

I'm not going to even try to describe why this is so... and the ATL is not known for ease of transportation. But it's gotten better over the last 10 years not worse.

But when I'm in Denver I enjoy myself. If you can't find a good time in Denver, that's on you imo.
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Old 10-16-2012, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
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I like Denver and go there a lot to visit family and see Bronco games and musicals at the Buell. I think the club scene is fun and the restaurants are good. In fact I am going this weekend to see Memphis and will eat out as well. My favorite part of town is the downtown/ LODO/ Capitol Hill area. If I was to move to Denver that is where I would live but its unlikely I will ever leave Pueblo.

Now that I have said what I like about Denver I will say what I do not like. Many of the politicians and business leaders have a Denver centric view when it comes to the state and its always a fight to get things down here. It was a fight to get the university, its a fight to keep the fair, road money for highways especially highway 50 since it does not pass thru the Denver MSA etc. In my opinion I believe that many in Denver feel that if it does not happen in Denver in the state then its not important and they need to change that opinion because a stronger Pueblo or Colorado Springs or Fort Collins or Grand Junction means a stronger Denver just like a stronger Denver means a stronger Pueblo, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins, Grand Junction etc.
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Old 10-16-2012, 11:33 AM
 
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I live in Fort Collins and can honestly say that I don't really think of Denver at all. The Front Range just kind of blends together for me and Denver just happens to be the largest city. We have many of the same chains up here, our weather is basically the same, recreational opportunities are similar, etc. Denver is where my news comes from, where I go to the airport, and is the place with the big city skyline, but other than that it's nothing special. It's just kinda there. There are so many things that make Colorado great and they're mostly outside of metro Denver.
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Old 10-16-2012, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by new2colo View Post
I live in Fort Collins and can honestly say that I don't really think of Denver at all. The Front Range just kind of blends together for me and Denver just happens to be the largest city. We have many of the same chains up here, our weather is basically the same, recreational opportunities are similar, etc. Denver is where my news comes from, where I go to the airport, and is the place with the big city skyline, but other than that it's nothing special. It's just kinda there. There are so many things that make Colorado great and they're mostly outside of metro Denver.
That is a interesting perspective and I never though of it that way before. Now that I have I can see where you are coming from.....
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Old 10-16-2012, 12:29 PM
 
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Wink Denver

My view that without the mountains Colorado would not be Colorado—so why would one want to live in Denver or along the Front Range?

Although that is anything but entirely fair. The one ingredient which makes the Front Range what it is are the mountains, and proximity to them. Even if on the plains, just that magnificent view informs life in these towns. Boulder is perhaps the best example of that.

As for Denver, if occasion to visit I will, otherwise avoiding it. This most particularly has to do with driving through that city on either I-25 or I-70, being something I really would rather not. Compared to places in California and elsewhere, traffic in Denver surely isn't all that bad; but in contrast to most of Colorado where traffic and parking are seldom issues, and near empty roads more the norm, it is the big bad city. Being more than used to multi-lane highways, it was still a shock once when I spent an entire summer in the fairly quiet confines of far southern Colorado, but in later traveling to Denver with its (in contrast) frenetic speed, feeling like a fish out of water. That wears off. Although I imagine for those rarely traveling to Denver or even a larger town, doing so could elicit a similar feeling—and perhaps desire to get back home as soon as possible.

Or they might be entranced and want to hang around. Obviously for much that is social it is the place to be. I can't speak to much of that, but for sports, the arts and so forth, Denver is obviously preeminent. Moreover it often seems when an opposing NFL team is in town, or anyone else one might hear commenting on Denver, it seems they invariably have a good time: they enjoy the mountains, even if not visiting them, and suitably satisfied with all the charms of Denver itself. So as most any state will have at least one city of some size, it is nice to know that ours is often thought well of by visitors.

Whether most of Colorado's population residing in a narrow band along the Front Range is a good thing or not is another question. There are far too many, without doubt. That could benefit the rest of the state, in remaining relatively empty, although certain other select areas have infilled as well. Political power tends to remain in populated areas, so Denver and environs will have an outsize sway. That wouldn't matter so much if they just left everybody else alone, but cannot. Other areas might be largely ignored, but any town or city will in proportion necessarily have a far larger footprint and draw upon resources than its immediate town limits. Water is the perfect illustration of this, and all that is imported to Denver and the Front Range. But in food also they could not begin to be self-sufficient. So in one degree or another everyone else and place in Colorado are as planets held in sway around Denver, answering to her wishes. If far enough removed or insignificant, their resources may not be appropriated, at least directly. But if you are a Silver Plume or someone else, if Denver decides some huge road through your town would be beneficial (for them), then said "benefit" will probably be bestowed, like it or not.

Obviously no one local is going to like that, save perhaps some civic boosters if they are in on the scheme. But human nature being what it is, only natural to feel most at home geographically close, casting a perhaps wary eye towards the 800 pound gorilla just on the far side of the Front Range Mountains.

Bringing us back to the high country. Some of the resort areas might as well be Denver in microcosm, if with a more direct view of the mountains. But there is far more beyond that. As said, each of these towns, even if small, will have an outsized influence over its neighborhood. So for true wilderness one need travel beyond the edge of that, and then to the end of some trail, or perhaps even off it. But at last one can be in nothing less than an alpine postcard that many another from magazines or whatnot only dream of. Perhaps only from the vantage of their kitchen window in Denver, in wistfully looking out.

That is the dream and reality, and what in part makes Denver—Denver. She can be avoided or embraced, but at least in this state never entirely ignored. Yet from a greater perspective but a regional city, holding a somewhat tenuous sway over a vaster, and in places far wilder land. Not an always easy interplay, in most humans still being as children in their wisdom yet gained. But as constant reminder of her place, the snowcapped vista just to her west.
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Old 10-16-2012, 12:52 PM
 
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I loathe what Denver and the Front Range has become. It is a poster child of how to take a formerly beautiful and livable place and degrade it almost beyond recognition for those of us who knew it "back when." A lot of people in the metro areas have a real arrogance about the Front Range and how it really doesn't need the rural areas of Colorado or the greater Rocky Mountain West for its survival. They think that the Front Range is a free-standing economic island that is no longer dependent on the "hinterlands" around it for survival. Bluntly, that's crap. The Front Range is an economic center of the region still in large part BECAUSE of what goes on in the greater region. Resource extraction, agriculture, non-metro tourism still provide--either directly or indirectly--much of the economic activity that supports the metro areas.

As for living there, I have in the past. I've had to work there some even when I did not live there--that's the economic reality for a lot of people in rural Colorado. I've also had numerous job offers and opportunities to relocate there at far higher salaries and with less work than I have had to do to earn a living in rural Colorado. Well, money isn't everything--I've turned down those opportunities. If I had to live in a metro area to make a living--it would not be in Colorado. There are nicer places with a better overall quality of life at lower costs elsewhere. As much as I love many facets of the Colorado climate and the mountains, they aren't everything. There are other things that are also important and, at some point, those may override my vision of the "quality of life" in Colorado--especially when so many people are pouring into this state seemingly hell-bent on destroying what remains of the state's endearing qualities and growing the things that I hate about it at cancerous rates.
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