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Old 11-12-2012, 01:56 AM
 
359 posts, read 513,381 times
Reputation: 327

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
I am confident that legalization will reduce crime and gang violence. That's a big plus.
This is going to sound like a complete non-sequitur at first, but there is a reason I'm bringing it up. Want to know what has become the target of many break-ins and burglaries, including some where the thieves smashed up the walls in an attempt to get the goods?

Hair extensions. Perfectly legal hair extensions.

Hair Extension Thefts on the Rise - NYTimes.com

Chicago Hair Extension Theft Involves Battering Through Walls, Dodging Motion Detectors

$230K worth of hair extensions stolen from beauty supply store - Chicago Sun-Times

In other words, something that is legal is now the subject of _rising_ crime.

Making pot legal is not going to reduce crime. As long as there is money to be made, criminals are still going to be involved. The only way you would reduce crime is by getting everyone to lose interest in pot -- then no one would be buying it, so there would be no money to be made, and no point for gangs to have anything to do with it. But as long as people want it, criminals will try to be involved in the trade.

(And if you were referring to the idea that suddenly gangs would all start smoking and be too high to be violent, you know that's not going to happen.)
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Old 11-12-2012, 06:54 AM
 
1,059 posts, read 1,634,577 times
Reputation: 1928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jehjeh View Post
This is going to sound like a complete non-sequitur at first, but there is a reason I'm bringing it up. Want to know what has become the target of many break-ins and burglaries, including some where the thieves smashed up the walls in an attempt to get the goods?

Hair extensions. Perfectly legal hair extensions.

Hair Extension Thefts on the Rise - NYTimes.com

Chicago Hair Extension Theft Involves Battering Through Walls, Dodging Motion Detectors

$230K worth of hair extensions stolen from beauty supply store - Chicago Sun-Times

In other words, something that is legal is now the subject of _rising_ crime.

Making pot legal is not going to reduce crime. As long as there is money to be made, criminals are still going to be involved. The only way you would reduce crime is by getting everyone to lose interest in pot -- then no one would be buying it, so there would be no money to be made, and no point for gangs to have anything to do with it. But as long as people want it, criminals will try to be involved in the trade.

(And if you were referring to the idea that suddenly gangs would all start smoking and be too high to be violent, you know that's not going to happen.)
Are we having much trouble with bootleg liquor these days?

Hair extensions aren't under a regulation as liquor is and cannabis will be. Hair extension robberies are hardly analogous to potential crime involving a regulated & controlled product.
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Old 11-12-2012, 06:57 AM
 
1,059 posts, read 1,634,577 times
Reputation: 1928
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
The sky is falling in the Netherlands. They are tightening up their laws as we speak and making changes as drug dealers have overwhelmed the streets and the drug tourism business has gotten out of control. The changes could end up banning foreigners from entering cannabis cafes. There are a variety of local laws on the books now as well as national ones being formulated. In addition many towns and cities are finding ways to shut down cannabis cafes.

Cannabis is NOT decriminalized and never has been in the Netherlands. Possessing it or cultivating is still a crime, just that law enforcement overlooks small quantities.

The big issue is that cannabis is not what it was 40 years ago. The THC levels are off the charts in comparison and the Dutch and their long known tolerance is running out with all the potheads stumbling around in a stupor on the streets.

So it's kinda of funny, the Dutch let it slide for a while like Colorado is trying to do and it ended up being a bigger problem then before along with a huge cost to the community. More drug trafficking, more drug dealers, more potheads in a stupor, more health issues.

Cannabis does inhibit social interaction between people because it impairs their judgment and motor skills. It's a drug that has an effect on the brain and not a good one either. The "greatest minds in history" were not potheads. And if they did smoke pot, it wasn't the refined drug it is now with skyhigh THC levels. Cannabis is about 40 times stronger now than the plant used in the 1960's by pothead hippies. As I said previously potheads seem to think they are these enlightened whimsical people thanks to pot, they just don't realize that it sounds like incoherent babbling to those of us that are sober.
Wanneroo, you regurgitate the same tired old reefer madness arguments that continue to be laid in front of everyone like a flea infested old rug.

Get serious and find some facts. Your continued wild claims just make you look sillier & sillier.

If you want credibility, try backing it up some time if you know how. I mean, you do know about Google, don't you?
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:09 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,777,680 times
Reputation: 9132
99% of what I see in these posts are from people who are using pot illegally and post incessantly to justify that it's OK for them to continue to use pot. It's pretty much the rationalization that alcoholics use to justify continuing drinking: just keeping saying to oneself, "It's OK, it's OK," and the user starts to believe his own BS after awhile. Making pot legal just gives the potheads one more reason to justify continuing using.

As to the "it brings in tax revenue" argument, well, why don't we make prostitution down to age 16 legal, too, and tax it? That would bring in lots of tax revenue, as well--the hell with the unpleasant side effects, right? Letting the johns have fun is what it's all about. And as to reducing criminal activity and the cartels? Well, cartels and the lower level creeps that they support (a lot of them illegal immigrants--another little "inconvenient truth" that the pro-immigration crowd dodges all the time) already have control of a lot of the production and distribution infrastructure. They won't give that up readily. In fact, were pot to be legalized nationally, at least for some extended period of time, it would make their operations more profitable and powerful--the cartels won't have to worry about paying off the Border Patrol or operating an expensive clandestine distribution chain. They can take the money they save and use it to intimidate and shake down "legitimate" producers that might try to compete with them. Without federal legalization and with only a couple of states with recreational pot legal, the cartels will continue business as usual--with all the criminal sleazebags continuing to be supported by "legal" Colorado stoners.

The pro pot crowd is so busy wanting to get their weed and smoke it, that they can't think clearly about any of the inconvenient implications of what they want--legal or not. Typical of self-centered, hedonistic stoners who only can think about their next high.
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 13,044,988 times
Reputation: 3566
Jazz, it's been decriminalized in most states for years now.
This means that a adult can posses a ounce in their home.
The fine if you got caught with it (some how) is only $200 and it carry's NO jail time or confiscation.
It is a Petty misdemeanor this does not constitute a crime as there is no jail time associated with it.

I don't need to justify it in any way.

A residency clause is interesting .
I can not break the law of the state of MN when I'm in Co.

Jazz, it will hit the carrells right in the pocket book.
This will remove any incentive.
Some will still try to operate outside of the law and i'k sure that will come with it's own set of consequences
The LEGAL availability will drive down the price, and the NEW tax will drive it back up so there could still be a black-market demand. i guess we'll find out wouldn't we.

And with out a physical addiction it's easy to wait.

Last edited by snofarmer; 11-12-2012 at 09:40 AM..
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
48 posts, read 145,981 times
Reputation: 44
Default drunks and potheads

Funny that most of what I read about marijuana is against potheads. A pothead is some one that habitually smokes pot . Everything said about some one that smokes too much pot could be said about some one that is a drunk. Most people that drink are not drunks and most people that smoke pot are not potheads. Anyone that that constantly takes a drug will be messed up. Most the people in my life that are dying from drugs , are dying from legal pills...
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:38 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,777,680 times
Reputation: 9132
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
Jazz, it's been decriminalized in most states for years now.
This means that a adult can posses a ounce in their home.
The fine if you got caught with it (some how) is only $200 and it carry's NO jail time or confiscation.
It is a Petty misdemeanor this does not constitute a crime as there is no jail time associated with it.

I don't need to justify it in any way.

Now the residency clause is interesting and unAmericana.
I can not break the law of the state of MN when I'm in Co.
Yeah, and thank you for supporting the Mexican drug cartels that are raising hell with this whole part of the country. Maybe if the cartel people would only shoot the people who are using their product, instead of whomever happens to get in their way, things might be different.
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
48 posts, read 145,981 times
Reputation: 44
I was thinking of moving to Colorado before this new law . The bad part about this new law is people with Colorado license plates will probably be hassled by the cops when driving in other states .
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,835,798 times
Reputation: 9316
timber mt wrote: The bad part about this new law is people with Colorado license plates will probably be hassled by the cops when driving in other states

Especially when the cop doing the hassling needs to replenish his personal stash.
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Old 11-12-2012, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 13,044,988 times
Reputation: 3566
Nope, a local farmer, a American, subsidizing their income.
America is the biggest producer of pot.

Then most of it comes in from Canada, think BC.
Very little if any in my area comes from Mexico.

Cocaine, herion and meth are the money makers for the cartels.
pot is just a sideline for them and it makes up just a fraction of their business.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Yeah, and thank you for supporting the Mexican drug cartels that are raising hell with this whole part of the country. Maybe if the cartel people would only shoot the people who are using their product, instead of whomever happens to get in their way, things might be different.
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