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Old 11-09-2012, 11:05 PM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,943 posts, read 7,302,240 times
Reputation: 1690

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
One thing that happened in California that I hope Colorado follows is how the state grew. For the longest time most of the population was in northern California then southern California took off and now is much larger. I am hoping the same thing happens here as I would love southern Colorado (the Colorado Springs MSA and the Pueblo MSA) to just grow and devlop into one large CSA (Pueblo/ Springs CSA) that is larger then the Denver CSA.

Why in God's name would you want that? I appreciate the seperation between the cities. Colorado already become too over populated. The OP is right, this state is turning into California 2.0
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Old 11-10-2012, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,535 posts, read 10,841,704 times
Reputation: 19114
I grew up in the Chicago area; I hated it. I hated the corruption, the weather both summer and winter, and especially all of the oppressive laws. I had been on many vacations to Colorado and from boyhood I had sensed that Colorado was a far freer state. Finally, in 1967 my late wife and I were able to move there. The people were friendly and freedom was in the air. But I realized I no longer cared for Denver. Freedom to people there seemed to mean little more than freedom to drug themselves. But the rest of the state was different. In 1967 Colorado became the first state to legalize abortion under a Republican governor and legislature. There was never a mention of passing antigun laws. People wanted fewer taxes and supported business. The boys at the Pancake House in Manitou still shared their conservatism (real conservatsm, what's called libertarianism today) and talked about the old days. They welcomed right wingers from anyplace. The native vs. transplant garbage was years in the future.

But dark clouds were gathering. People were more accepting of big government. A different sort of transplant came into being. These weren't people who came to Colorado for what Colorado was politically. They came to make Colorado become the liberal state they'd left. It became worse and worse politically. The boys at the Pancake House and others like them were either dead or centenarians in nursing homes.

I could understand how Clinton won in '92 but not in '96; the final blow came in 2000. There had been a bill in the state legislature to require a police criminal check on private sales of firearms at gun shows; it went down to the ignominious defeat that it deserved. But the people pushing it didn't give up. They started a petition drive and got it on the ballot. We were stunned and depressed when it happened. It was New Colorado vs. Old Colrado; Old Colorado lost. They took away our home.

Two years later we were able to move to Wyoming. The weather is rough; the scenery is rougher. But only Jackson draws liberals; the rest of the state is solidly conservative or libertarian. Wyoming offers one big thing, the right to live your life in freedom. It's like Colorado in the Fifties and early Sixties.; the boys still hold their discussions at coffee shops. Of course, now I'm old enough to be one of the boys.

I miss Colorado, but not the Colorado of today. Oh, I miss those 70 degree days in January after the storm and cold air mass have passed. I miss hiking in the mountains and exploring ghost towns and ghost railroads. But I don't miss those people who made me a refugee.
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Old 11-10-2012, 01:27 PM
 
92 posts, read 154,383 times
Reputation: 144
To answer your question: Yes, it absolutely is.
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Old 11-10-2012, 02:25 PM
 
2,784 posts, read 3,941,242 times
Reputation: 3001
lalahartma: Yes, I have visited CO many times. In Denver and FoCo for three days in July, in Denver for a whole week in '98. I have been in Cortez- Durango a couple of times several years ago. Family used to like to fish in the Creed area. Grandfather was born in Monte Vista. I am just trying to sort out how all of you see the state, especially after last Tuesday. I doesn't look like CO has the financial problems that CAL has. I did undergraduate in LA and, while I am glad I had that opportunity to live there for 4 years, I don't want to live there now even if I have relatives that live in the Sacramento area. Too many people, high taxes, too much regulation. Anyway, thanks for the opinions. :-)

Last edited by Rogarven; 11-10-2012 at 03:36 PM..
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Old 11-10-2012, 02:34 PM
 
1,059 posts, read 1,634,577 times
Reputation: 1928
I think that CO has a nice balance of conservatives, liberals, and independents and is in general, a very much live & let live kind of place. I would hope that it wouldn't be overrun with liberals or any other viewpoint which would take hold and become dominant. I am an independent who has voted both left & right in the past and probably will in the future as well. I hate to see things swing too far in either direction as I believe that having the population centered on average will keep everything more balanced across the board regardless of your leanings. That balance is obviously one of the reasons that both sides battled hard in the state and I think that just makes for a better election since both candidates then need to work harder to win the vote. True across federal, state, and local elections. Even Amendment 64 had support on both sides of the aisle.
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,174 posts, read 20,955,081 times
Reputation: 4258
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
Why in God's name would you want that? I appreciate the seperation between the cities. Colorado already become too over populated. The OP is right, this state is turning into California 2.0
Actually if you look at the land between Pueblo and Colorado Springs there is no open space planned. Currently the city of Pueblo actually extends to El Paso county (Pueblo Springs Ranch) and the only reason there is no development is thanks to the recession. Once this recession is over Pueblo is poised to grow north closing the gap between the cities.



Here is a map so you can see what I am referring to.

Why do I want it? Cities have to grow to thrive and while there are aspects of a smaller Pueblo and Colorado Springs I would miss there are more advantages to a larger Pueblo and Colorado Springs I would enjoy such as better concerts, plays, restaurants etc.

Last edited by Josseppie; 11-10-2012 at 03:59 PM..
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Old 11-10-2012, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,174 posts, read 20,955,081 times
Reputation: 4258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
I grew up in the Chicago area; I hated it. I hated the corruption, the weather both summer and winter, and especially all of the oppressive laws. I had been on many vacations to Colorado and from boyhood I had sensed that Colorado was a far freer state. Finally, in 1967 my late wife and I were able to move there. The people were friendly and freedom was in the air. But I realized I no longer cared for Denver. Freedom to people there seemed to mean little more than freedom to drug themselves. But the rest of the state was different. In 1967 Colorado became the first state to legalize abortion under a Republican governor and legislature. There was never a mention of passing antigun laws. People wanted fewer taxes and supported business. The boys at the Pancake House in Manitou still shared their conservatism (real conservatsm, what's called libertarianism today) and talked about the old days. They welcomed right wingers from anyplace. The native vs. transplant garbage was years in the future.

But dark clouds were gathering. People were more accepting of big government. A different sort of transplant came into being. These weren't people who came to Colorado for what Colorado was politically. They came to make Colorado become the liberal state they'd left. It became worse and worse politically. The boys at the Pancake House and others like them were either dead or centenarians in nursing homes.

I could understand how Clinton won in '92 but not in '96; the final blow came in 2000. There had been a bill in the state legislature to require a police criminal check on private sales of firearms at gun shows; it went down to the ignominious defeat that it deserved. But the people pushing it didn't give up. They started a petition drive and got it on the ballot. We were stunned and depressed when it happened. It was New Colorado vs. Old Colrado; Old Colorado lost. They took away our home.

Two years later we were able to move to Wyoming. The weather is rough; the scenery is rougher. But only Jackson draws liberals; the rest of the state is solidly conservative or libertarian. Wyoming offers one big thing, the right to live your life in freedom. It's like Colorado in the Fifties and early Sixties.; the boys still hold their discussions at coffee shops. Of course, now I'm old enough to be one of the boys.

I miss Colorado, but not the Colorado of today. Oh, I miss those 70 degree days in January after the storm and cold air mass have passed. I miss hiking in the mountains and exploring ghost towns and ghost railroads. But I don't miss those people who made me a refugee.
Sounds to me that you just like a low population conservative state. That is ok but defiantly not Colorado as this state was meant to grow by its founders and because of certain cities (Denver, Boulder and Pueblo) was always more democratic/ liberal then Wyoming is.

I am glad you are happy in Cody!
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Old 11-10-2012, 09:29 PM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,943 posts, read 7,302,240 times
Reputation: 1690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
I grew up in the Chicago area; I hated it. I hated the corruption, the weather both summer and winter, and especially all of the oppressive laws. I had been on many vacations to Colorado and from boyhood I had sensed that Colorado was a far freer state. Finally, in 1967 my late wife and I were able to move there. The people were friendly and freedom was in the air. But I realized I no longer cared for Denver. Freedom to people there seemed to mean little more than freedom to drug themselves. But the rest of the state was different. In 1967 Colorado became the first state to legalize abortion under a Republican governor and legislature. There was never a mention of passing antigun laws. People wanted fewer taxes and supported business. The boys at the Pancake House in Manitou still shared their conservatism (real conservatsm, what's called libertarianism today) and talked about the old days. They welcomed right wingers from anyplace. The native vs. transplant garbage was years in the future.

But dark clouds were gathering. People were more accepting of big government. A different sort of transplant came into being. These weren't people who came to Colorado for what Colorado was politically. They came to make Colorado become the liberal state they'd left. It became worse and worse politically. The boys at the Pancake House and others like them were either dead or centenarians in nursing homes.

I could understand how Clinton won in '92 but not in '96; the final blow came in 2000. There had been a bill in the state legislature to require a police criminal check on private sales of firearms at gun shows; it went down to the ignominious defeat that it deserved. But the people pushing it didn't give up. They started a petition drive and got it on the ballot. We were stunned and depressed when it happened. It was New Colorado vs. Old Colrado; Old Colorado lost. They took away our home.

Two years later we were able to move to Wyoming. The weather is rough; the scenery is rougher. But only Jackson draws liberals; the rest of the state is solidly conservative or libertarian. Wyoming offers one big thing, the right to live your life in freedom. It's like Colorado in the Fifties and early Sixties.; the boys still hold their discussions at coffee shops. Of course, now I'm old enough to be one of the boys.

I miss Colorado, but not the Colorado of today. Oh, I miss those 70 degree days in January after the storm and cold air mass have passed. I miss hiking in the mountains and exploring ghost towns and ghost railroads. But I don't miss those people who made me a refugee.

Jesus Christ, I think we were seperated at birth.....God do I miss that Colorado.
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Old 11-10-2012, 09:34 PM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,943 posts, read 7,302,240 times
Reputation: 1690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
Actually if you look at the land between Pueblo and Colorado Springs there is no open space planned. Currently the city of Pueblo actually extends to El Paso county (Pueblo Springs Ranch) and the only reason there is no development is thanks to the recession. Once this recession is over Pueblo is poised to grow north closing the gap between the cities.



Here is a map so you can see what I am referring to.

Why do I want it? Cities have to grow to thrive and while there are aspects of a smaller Pueblo and Colorado Springs I would miss there are more advantages to a larger Pueblo and Colorado Springs I would enjoy such as better concerts, plays, restaurants etc.

There was plenty of development, until yes, the recession hit. I personally know one of the developers in the Midway Ranch area behind PPIR, that went from a 2 year waiting list to have a home built, to not being able to give them away for less than the build cost. It was like someone turned off a faucet.

However, those areas were meant to STAY unincorporated, free from HOA's and Covenants and strip malls and all sorts of other unwanted BS that comes with cities gettting bigger. Everyone I know that lives there, built their house there BECAUSE, they enjoy such things as owning horses, shooting guns and being able to park an RV in their driveway without the HOA Nazi's sending nasty letters.

I don't EVER want to see the area beween Colorado Springs and Pueblo developed into a gross conglomeration of 2 distinct and very different cities.
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Old 11-10-2012, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,174 posts, read 20,955,081 times
Reputation: 4258
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
There was plenty of development, until yes, the recession hit. I personally know one of the developers in the Midway Ranch area behind PPIR, that went from a 2 year waiting list to have a home built, to not being able to give them away for less than the build cost. It was like someone turned off a faucet.

However, those areas were meant to STAY unincorporated, free from HOA's and Covenants and strip malls and all sorts of other unwanted BS that comes with cities gettting bigger. Everyone I know that lives there, built their house there BECAUSE, they enjoy such things as owning horses, shooting guns and being able to park an RV in their driveway without the HOA Nazi's sending nasty letters.

I don't EVER want to see the area beween Colorado Springs and Pueblo developed into a gross conglomeration of 2 distinct and very different cities.
Well the developmental plans have already been submitted and aproved by the city of Pueblo so it's a matter of "when" not "if" it will be developed. That includes a tech park zoned for sky scrapers that when completed will be larger then the Denver Tech Center, the main exit will be exit 110 by Pinon in Pueblo county. I guess in many ways I-25 is much like I-5 in Cali, on a smaller scale.
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