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Old 11-20-2012, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,111 posts, read 4,881,407 times
Reputation: 5429

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There are some things that you haven't accounted for:

1. The cost to adopt, feed, and keep some sort of dog. If you go hiking without a dog (specifically some sort of medium-sized or large dog), all the other hikers will make fun of you. Owning a dog is mandatory in Colorado.

2. The cost of a suitable bicycle. In Colorado, the standard is this: take the value of your car and multiply that number by 2.5. That is the minimum you are required to spend on a bicycle. Colorado is the only state where you will see a $7500 bike on top of a car worth $3000.
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Old 11-20-2012, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Delaware, OH
13 posts, read 51,643 times
Reputation: 22
Quote:
Apartments; I'm picky and this is minor, but I looked at 18 apartments before I moved here (flew out two weeks prior to move date) and the consistent thing about them all is the layouts stink. Could just be my problem, but I eventually got one with a garage for storage b/c half my furniture wasn't useful. A lot of places have these built-in ridiculously stupid shelving/tv/fireplace get ups which take up a whole wall and only fit a 25'' TV. Again, minor and probably more likely to only affect me or the minority of tenants.
I find that having a randomly place fireplace in the middle of a living room to be quite popular in many of the apartments I look at. It's really weird, and I agree the layouts are kinda "meh", but overall I think could live with them, wouldn't spend too much time there after.

Quote:
I feel like I have to say that pointing out these negatives just feels wrong. This place is so amazing. If I made a proper list of good and bad, the good would outweigh the bad 10:1.
I don't like pointing these negatives out either, but in a good way it's just proving how strong the good things are, as you said they outweigh the bad 10:1.

Quote:
There are some things that you haven't accounted for:

1. The cost to adopt, feed, and keep some sort of dog. If you go hiking without a dog (specifically some sort of medium-sized or large dog), all the other hikers will make fun of you. Owning a dog is mandatory in Colorado.

2. The cost of a suitable bicycle. In Colorado, the standard is this: take the value of your car and multiply that number by 2.5. That is the minimum you are required to spend on a bicycle. Colorado is the only state where you will see a $7500 bike on top of a car worth $3000.
1. I'm bringing a dog, he is a medium/large black dog, so that's one thing out of the way. Also, when I get there I think I will hunt as well as start a garden. I believe those two together could feed a dog quite well.

2. I laughed my butt off at this one, still chuckling a bit actually. I have no doubt there are people that do this, especially in one of the most bike active places I've ever seen. Don't think I could spend that much on a bike though... Guess I won't fit in very well.
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Old 11-20-2012, 05:11 PM
 
20 posts, read 65,010 times
Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post

2. The cost of a suitable bicycle. In Colorado, the standard is this: take the value of your car and multiply that number by 2.5. That is the minimum you are required to spend on a bicycle. Colorado is the only state where you will see a $7500 bike on top of a car worth $3000.
I just have to comment on this one...I know what you're trying to say -- Colorado is known for biking, therefore, you're going to have MORE options when it comes to purchasing. Your car value multiplied by 2.5 is definitely not the minimum. I agree that many CHOOSE to spend that much money (and many do), but as a cheapskate, I can personally tell you it's not all that Colorado offers. I live directly beside a bike shop and there are plenty of options in the hundred dollar range. These bikes will of course require more up-keep than the $7500 bike, but nonetheless, the beauty of Colorado is that there are MANY options in our active state.
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Old 11-22-2012, 01:56 AM
 
Location: Colorado
85 posts, read 156,765 times
Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
There are some things that you haven't accounted for:

1. The cost to adopt, feed, and keep some sort of dog. If you go hiking without a dog (specifically some sort of medium-sized or large dog), all the other hikers will make fun of you. Owning a dog is mandatory in Colorado.
This is very true. And yet, finding an apartment to rent that will allow dogs is next to impossible. It's a weird Colorado paradox... Where do they all live??
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Old 11-22-2012, 04:38 AM
 
1,512 posts, read 1,572,224 times
Reputation: 579
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickel More View Post
Suicides are tragic and extremely confusing to me, however I don't see how it could affect me.
Suicides (and massacres) are a statement about the culture in the same way that infant mortality is a statement about health care.

Colorado is in the unique position of being the massacre capital of America and riding the trend line of high suicide areas. One aberrant phenomenon might be a curiosity. Two aberrant phenomena?


Quote:
...what could convince me not to move to that state?
Only you.
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Old 11-22-2012, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,111 posts, read 4,881,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Homogenizer View Post
Suicides (and massacres) are a statement about the culture in the same way that infant mortality is a statement about health care.

Colorado is in the unique position of being the massacre capital of America and riding the trend line of high suicide areas. One aberrant phenomenon might be a curiosity. Two aberrant phenomena?
I would disagree with Colorado being the massacre capital of the US. Three high profile incidents (with the latest perpetrated by an individual who lived here about a year) does not make us the worst. I think Colorado has such a good reputation for being a great place to live, that when incidents like this happen, people are shocked. When it happens in California (8 mass killings in the last 30 years), people don't bat an eye. There are a few states that have experienced 3 or more mass killings including: Wisconsin, Texas, Florida, and Washington. Check out Mother Jones' map of mass shootings.

Maybe what makes Colorado stand out is that 2 of the 3 were planned out and then executed, as opposed to a person who snaps and starts killing. Perhaps this happens because of Colorado's culture of live and let live, so we might be less likely to call the police regarding suspicious behavior. We can speculate all day long, but there are too few incidents to create a reliable profile for motives.

As for suicide, Colorado ranked 6th in this list of 2009 statistics. Interestingly, all of the top ten states were sparsely populated western states. Maybe that has something to do with it. Maybe it is the individualist, "rugged man" mindset that keeps people from opening up or seeking help. It is definitely worth studying.
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
2,311 posts, read 3,594,540 times
Reputation: 5317
My mother and I moved from IL to rural Colorado back in 1977 when I was twelve.
I now live back east again in eastern PA after living in Denver.

A little over half of Colorado is treeless and brown in the majority of the eastern part of the state.
It is extremely dry and arid with sandy soil.

Of course this part of the state is the least populated and the least expense in which to live.
With that said even in eastern parts of the state the real estate prices comparatively to the midwest is shockingly more expensive.

The Rocky mountains are beautiful indeed but in order to live within a reasonable distance to them one must inhabit the megaopolis front range metroplex.
Denver and vicinity has a growing issue of smog and can become severe st times to where local municipalities post warnings concerning those that are sensitive to such.

Housing along the front range have always been expensive but within the last 15 years the cost, including the market downturn has sky rocketed.

What a 150,000 dollars will buy you in OH could cost you 250,000 + along the front range.
Employment is good but competition is very fierce.

Because the climate of Co is very arid and dry watering restrictions go into effect every summer for home owners concerning lawn watering, etc.

Forest fires in the mountains, especially due to the Pine beetle infestation killing trees has increased at an alarming rate in NM,CO,WY,MT, etc.

These dead trees are perfect fuel for lightning strike wild fires that will always occur each season.

Visiting CO is far far different than living there.

If you have been in the midwest and or east most of your life thus far the geographical shock of not seeing rain or lush green in hardwood forests will get to you quickly.

I trust this has assisted you.
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
3,768 posts, read 4,618,092 times
Reputation: 4885
One thing that others have not seemed to cover is that Denver has long been known as Menver, Colorado is one of the few areas in the country where there are more single men then women, I have had friends who complained the had a much harder time finding a decent girl here then they did in other areas of the country.
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Old 11-22-2012, 10:40 AM
 
20,836 posts, read 39,046,511 times
Reputation: 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
...As for suicide, Colorado ranked 6th in this list of 2009 statistics. Interestingly, all of the top ten states were sparsely populated western states. Maybe that has something to do with it. Maybe it is the individualist, "rugged man" mindset that keeps people from opening up or seeking help. It is definitely worth studying.
I think that's part of it, these guys who won't let anyone help them, as if it's a sign of weakness, and heaven knows, that rugged "marlboro man" self-reliant self-image would never wimp out and seek help. IMO there's a companion issue here, which is that a lot of unhappy people keep moving west, hoping to find some sort of promised land or happy place, but wherever you go - there you are - and whatever problems you had - are right there with you when you arrive. So when they get to the west coast, and there's nowhere further west they can run to, and they're still morbidly unhappy, they often end their life. I know a guy in another forum, hates everything, trusts no one, anxiously awaiting the day he can get to Alaska where everything is perfect. If he ever makes it to Alaska, he won't be coming back....
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Old 11-22-2012, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Denver area
172 posts, read 213,052 times
Reputation: 299
Like julian17033, my family moved here in the 70s from Illinois. Before moving we used to take vacations here in the summer. It's a GREAT place to vacation. But I'm hankering to move somewhere that has more humidity.

It isn't just your skin that dries out. My eyes are so dry & irritated I can hardly stand it some days. Same with my nasal passages. I start out every morning sneezing & blowing my nose & it just continues through the day.

Not everyone here has these problems so I must be extra sensitive to the dry air. And there ARE things that can help somewhat: humidifiers, lotion, eyedrops, drinking lots of water. But the dry air still makes me miserable. Just sayin', it's not for everyone.

On the PLUS side though, less humidity means fewer bugs . Not a lot of mosquitoes or fleas so that's a good thing.

The people here tend to be very friendly I find. And we LOVE dogs so you & your pooch will fit right in The mountains of course are spectacularly beautiful. The opportunities for outdoor activities are endless. Also, the winters in Denver aren't too bad. It can snow one day & be 60 degrees the next.

If the higher cost of living & dry climate aren't a problem for you you might really love it here
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