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Old 03-11-2016, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,051 posts, read 2,079,489 times
Reputation: 3536

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffaNYC View Post
Anyway, just reviving this thread because I'm wondering if anyone else has ever not been able to adjust to the altitude even after a year+, and/or loathed the climate/altitude here in Colorado, like I'm talking about?
Gotta admit, I never heard complaints of this until joining C-D.com. In all my years of interaction with transplanted co-workers, friends, and acquaintances, I've not heard of it happening out past a few months. I'm not totally surprised as the climate here can be harsh to someone from a lower, moister climate. I suppose there could be some underlying cause that is not readily apparent that is giving you the grief, but I also suspect you may be a minority in this regard. After all, the US Olympic Committee specifically located a training center in CoS because of the altitude's positive impact on an athlete's conditioning.
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Old 03-11-2016, 02:42 PM
 
3,461 posts, read 1,700,077 times
Reputation: 7095
Quote:
Anyway, just reviving this thread because I'm wondering if anyone else has ever not been able to adjust to the altitude even after a year+, and/or loathed the climate/altitude here in Colorado, like I'm talking about?
I have a friend who, after living here for 4 years, had to move back down to sea level on doctor's orders. She could never adjust and the altitude was stressing her heart.
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Old 03-11-2016, 10:10 PM
 
Location: NYC (Manhattan, btwn SoHo/LES)
607 posts, read 470,302 times
Reputation: 821
Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
It's so strange how different people react to the altitude. You sound like a very physical active, healthy person, yet couldn't adjust to the altitude, whereas I'm a fairly low-energy person with a mostly sedentary lifestyle, and I didn't have any problems adjusting. The first few weeks I got here, I was having some heartburn after eating, but then my body adjusted and never had any problems since. I do have some issues with dehydrating but that's just my dumb fault for not drinking enough.

The dry air is a killer though - my arm and leg skin is dry to begin with but here, it's worse. However, it's not as bad as bleeding! My hair always goes frizzy in the humidity so the dry air at least suits my hair.

It probably doesn't matter since you're leaving soon, but have you tried baby oil instead of lotion? If you're worried about that leaving too much excess oil and getting on your clothes, one tip I always give to people with dry skin is to take some baby oil in the shower with you. Before you get out of the shower, rub some oil in the driest parts of your body, then rinse with plain water. The water helps rinse away the excess so you're not getting oil all over your clothes, but it leaves enough to absorb into your skin.
Yeah, isn't it bizarre how things affect people so differently? I mean, I truly thought I would acclimate and adjust wonderfully, but I just haven't, and it's been beyond frustrating! I want to be my fit, active self again without being winded and feeling like dying! hah.

Oh and the other thing I've noticed, the past few months (this winter), is that my vocal chords and singing are being affected by the dryness. I'm a professional singer and all of a sudden, out of nowhere, my voice is more gravelly and it's harder to sing, and I've been researching possibilities, and the only thing that makes sense is the dryness must be stripping my vocal chords of the moisture they need. So not fun. :/

I actually use coconut and/or almond oil, and I've done the shower thing like you mention, and it doesn't seem to make much of a difference. It works temporarily, but only for a couple of hours, and then my skin is just flaking and dry and cracking again. I'm just not meant to be in the mountains, which is fine with me, because I don't want to be anyway. haha.
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Old 03-11-2016, 10:12 PM
 
Location: NYC (Manhattan, btwn SoHo/LES)
607 posts, read 470,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorges View Post
I have a friend who, after living here for 4 years, had to move back down to sea level on doctor's orders. She could never adjust and the altitude was stressing her heart.
I'm glad to know it's not just me - I thought maybe I was going crazy, but I think there are just people who, for whatever reason(s), can't seem to adjust. So weird.
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Old 03-11-2016, 10:14 PM
 
Location: NYC (Manhattan, btwn SoHo/LES)
607 posts, read 470,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryK123 View Post
part of the body's process to adjust is an increase in the red blood cell count. This normally takes about a month. If you are iron-deficient or anemic for some other reason, that could be the problem.

Have you seen a physician?
Yeah I got lab work done a little less than a year ago, and everything was totally fine (except for an extreme Vitamin D deficiency, so I've been taking Vitamin D every day since then). The only thing I suffer from is high blood pressure, which is hereditary, but I take medication for it which keeps it normal.
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Old 03-11-2016, 10:15 PM
 
Location: NYC (Manhattan, btwn SoHo/LES)
607 posts, read 470,302 times
Reputation: 821
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Gotta admit, I never heard complaints of this until joining C-D.com. In all my years of interaction with transplanted co-workers, friends, and acquaintances, I've not heard of it happening out past a few months. I'm not totally surprised as the climate here can be harsh to someone from a lower, moister climate. I suppose there could be some underlying cause that is not readily apparent that is giving you the grief, but I also suspect you may be a minority in this regard. After all, the US Olympic Committee specifically located a training center in CoS because of the altitude's positive impact on an athlete's conditioning.
Yeah, I was so hoping that living here would help me become even stronger and improve my stamina, but it hasn't...it's so frustrating and disappointing. I'm not sure what underlying problems it could be...I'm a relatively healthy 34 year old. It's bizarre.
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Old 03-11-2016, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,002 posts, read 11,633,974 times
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It's not bad enough for me to move away since the reasons I moved here in the first place are still the reasons I need to be here. But after the first 40-plus years of my life on the East Coast, I would say that I have not fully adjusted even after closing in on 10 years here. I can manage, but I feel so much better as soon as I get to a coast - I need the moisture as well as the low elevation. And while I am ok in Denver, I still feel it immediately when I get up above about 7000 ft. When I drive back home from a day in the mountains, I can literally feel my body adjust going downhill, once it gets to somewhere between 5500-6000, I feel like myself again.

So yeah, it isn't common but it happens.
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Old 03-12-2016, 11:05 AM
 
20,840 posts, read 39,059,222 times
Reputation: 19074
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiffaNYC View Post
Yeah I got lab work done a little less than a year ago, and everything was totally fine (except for an extreme Vitamin D deficiency, so I've been taking Vitamin D every day since then). The only thing I suffer from is high blood pressure, which is hereditary, but I take medication for it which keeps it normal.
Tiffany, I hope everything works out for you. Health problems suck. My wife had to take 50,000 units of D once a week for bone density issues; it worked, she's off that now. But IIRC Vitamin D is needed for making red blood cells which are what carry oxygen to the muscles, so my suggestion is to keep an eye on that measure.
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Old 03-12-2016, 12:27 PM
 
Location: NYC (Manhattan, btwn SoHo/LES)
607 posts, read 470,302 times
Reputation: 821
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
It's not bad enough for me to move away since the reasons I moved here in the first place are still the reasons I need to be here. But after the first 40-plus years of my life on the East Coast, I would say that I have not fully adjusted even after closing in on 10 years here. I can manage, but I feel so much better as soon as I get to a coast - I need the moisture as well as the low elevation. And while I am ok in Denver, I still feel it immediately when I get up above about 7000 ft. When I drive back home from a day in the mountains, I can literally feel my body adjust going downhill, once it gets to somewhere between 5500-6000, I feel like myself again.

So yeah, it isn't common but it happens.
Thanks for the reply! I'm glad to know it's not just in my head, haha.
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Old 03-12-2016, 12:36 PM
 
Location: NYC (Manhattan, btwn SoHo/LES)
607 posts, read 470,302 times
Reputation: 821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Tiffany, I hope everything works out for you. Health problems suck. My wife had to take 50,000 units of D once a week for bone density issues; it worked, she's off that now. But IIRC Vitamin D is needed for making red blood cells which are what carry oxygen to the muscles, so my suggestion is to keep an eye on that measure.
Thank you Mike! I appreciate it That's interesting about the Vitamin D...I've been taking 5000 IUs of Vitamin D3 about every other day for almost a year, now. I want to get my levels rechecked and see where I'm at, even though I'm moving, I still would like to know.
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