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Old 12-12-2012, 07:27 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 19,081,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post

The frightening part is that 50% of the irreplaceable aquifer water is already gone, and is expected to be exhausted in 25 years.
It's gonna get mighty thirsty then...
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Old 12-12-2012, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Deer Creek/Edmond, OKla
656 posts, read 1,715,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DOUBLE H View Post
prerunner1982. Google in Ken Burns, he's been involved in documentaries for years. A few of the ones I like the most are his docs on jazz, the west, and baseball (probably my favorite) There are several others of course.

Your kids are missing some essential watching, like Mike From Back East said in post #3 "too bad the young people don't watch the stuff."
2/3 of my kids are too young to understand and I can't blame the oldest (11). I don't think I was interested in this type of stuff either at her age. I didn't get into history until later in life when I got into genealogy.
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Old 12-12-2012, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Bend, OR
3,296 posts, read 8,420,129 times
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I love most of Ken Burn's stuff (and I'm a bit younger at 36), but haven't seen this one yet. We no longer get television, so I have to look stuff up online to find out what's happening. I'll have to check PBS and see if I can stream it or perhaps check and see if it's available on netflix. Interesting comments so far and something to truly think about as this country overall continues to deal with an immense drought.
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Old 12-12-2012, 04:52 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,774,765 times
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One of the reasons that we are in such a mess in this state and in this country is that no one really wants to know about history, anymore. From the people around me that I've talked to, there are relatively few people under the age of 30 that even knew that the Dust Bowl happened in Colorado, much less knew why it happened, how people were affected by it, or why it could happen again. What I call "historical ignorance" is now epidemic in this country, where few people think that anything that happened more than 10 years ago has any lessons for them or any importance to them. Really sad.
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Old 12-12-2012, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,173 posts, read 20,952,639 times
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^

Part of the problem is the way they teach history in school. Memorize the Gettysburg Address, memorize the constitution, memorize all the dates in history the teacher can give you. Boring. I hated history in high school but now that I am out and watch shows on the history channel and PBS history has became one of my favorite topics. While knowing some dates is important I think understanding the bigger picture of what happened and the consequences of the event are way more important and if teachers emphasized that students would enjoy history a lot more. Then they would understand events like the Dust Bowl.
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Old 12-12-2012, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Bend, OR
3,296 posts, read 8,420,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
^

Part of the problem is the way they teach history in school. Memorize the Gettysburg Address, memorize the constitution, memorize all the dates in history the teacher can give you. Boring. I hated history in high school but now that I am out and watch shows on the history channel and PBS history has became one of my favorite topics. While knowing some dates is important I think understanding the bigger picture of what happened and the consequences of the event are way more important and if teachers emphasized that students would enjoy history a lot more. Then they would understand events like the Dust Bowl.
This is true Josseppie, although very few curriculum now require memorization of dates. Things have changed quite a bit in regards to teaching history, but somehow it's still too boring for most kids. I admit, history was my least favorite subject throughout high school. It wasn't until college, when I was introduced to archeology, that I really became interested in history. I think history is one of those things that needs excitement for people to become interested. I wish schools would focus more on field trips for history, but unfortunately that won't be happening soon with all the budget cuts.
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Old 12-12-2012, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,834,005 times
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Josseppie wrote: Part of the problem is the way they teach history in school.

Ain't that the truth....and then some! The ONLY subject that was presented in my learning style ( kinesthetic ) was PE. Thankfully that was the one Ace I could count on. Back in the day, getting good grades in any other subject required the student to be an auditory learner ( my weakest learning style ). Good teachers now days take the learning style of the student into consideration and put forth some effort to create a match of styles. Back in 50s & 60s, if the unfortunate student was not an auditory learner, they were a mostly a mis-match with the teachers presentation style. More often then not, the student got pinned with the trouble maker label, with no responsibility shouldered by the teacher who lacked the skill to present their lessons in a modality that matched the students learning style. Not being an auditory learner, I was just about always out of sync with my so-called teachers.

Regarding Ken Burns. I loved the baseball series. That was compelling TV! This is the first time I've heard about the dust bowl series. I'd like to watch it. Looking forward to the next go round on PBS.
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Old 12-13-2012, 12:30 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
22,025 posts, read 10,255,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
^

Part of the problem is the way they teach history in school. Memorize the Gettysburg Address, memorize the constitution, memorize all the dates in history the teacher can give you. Boring. I hated history in high school but now that I am out and watch shows on the history channel and PBS history has became one of my favorite topics. While knowing some dates is important I think understanding the bigger picture of what happened and the consequences of the event are way more important and if teachers emphasized that students would enjoy history a lot more. Then they would understand events like the Dust Bowl.
Schools I've been affiliated with don't do most of that anymore.
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:59 AM
 
9,956 posts, read 6,257,809 times
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The history classes taught in school can be rather boring. It wasn't until I met my husband's granny that I took note of the dust bowl. She grew up on a ranch in Hansford Co Tx (directly south of the Oklahoma panhandle) and was one of those rare characters we are sometimes fortunate enough to learn from. Her stories and photos from that time period were amazing. She agreed with you Jazzlover, the land never should never have been plowed like it was. She was actually quite bitter about it. I'm sorry I missed the special, hope to catch a rerun of it.
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Old 12-13-2012, 03:01 AM
 
13,290 posts, read 25,455,947 times
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Much of the documentary was underlined by Timothy Egan's book called, I think, "The Worst Hard Times," focusing on the town of Dalhart (?) and the interviews Egan did were the same people in the film. I wasn't crazy about the film, but maybe that's because I found the book more evocative.
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