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Old 12-11-2012, 09:49 AM
 
352 posts, read 588,531 times
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The law states "between dusk and dawn". Is there some official definition of these two terms? Yes, I've searched high and low and only find "dusk and dawn". Like, headlights are supposed to be turned on 1/2 hour before you can't see anything? 1 hour? What is "dusk" anyway?

 
Old 12-11-2012, 10:39 AM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,192 posts, read 8,318,298 times
Reputation: 7127
It seems the actual law in Colorado Revised Statutes uses the words "sunrise and sunset". As in

"TITLE 42. VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC
REGULATION OF VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC
ARTICLE 4.REGULATION OF VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC
PART 2. EQUIPMENT
C.R.S. 42-4-204 (2012)
42-4-204. When lighted lamps are required



(1) Every vehicle upon a highway within this state, between sunset and sunrise and at any other time when, due to insufficient light or unfavorable atmospheric conditions, persons and vehicles on the highway are not clearly discernible at a distance of one thousand feet ahead, shall display lighted lamps and illuminating devices as required by this article for different classes of vehicles, subject to exceptions with respect to parked vehicles."

C.R.S. 42-4-204
 
Old 12-11-2012, 10:41 AM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,192 posts, read 8,318,298 times
Reputation: 7127
Re "What is "dusk" anyway?", see

Dusk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Old 12-11-2012, 10:46 AM
 
352 posts, read 588,531 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
It seems the actual law in Colorado Revised Statutes uses the words "sunrise and sunset". As in

"TITLE 42. VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC
REGULATION OF VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC
ARTICLE 4.REGULATION OF VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC
PART 2. EQUIPMENT
C.R.S. 42-4-204 (2012)
42-4-204. When lighted lamps are required



(1) Every vehicle upon a highway within this state, between sunset and sunrise and at any other time when, due to insufficient light or unfavorable atmospheric conditions, persons and vehicles on the highway are not clearly discernible at a distance of one thousand feet ahead, shall display lighted lamps and illuminating devices as required by this article for different classes of vehicles, subject to exceptions with respect to parked vehicles."

C.R.S. 42-4-204
So, "sunset and sunrise" as defined by who? Sunset (i.e. sun going "down") next the foothills is way sooner than out on the plains. "Clearly discernible" seems like a purely subjective call if pulled over--"hey, I can see just fine" Cop "no you can't".
 
Old 12-11-2012, 10:49 AM
 
352 posts, read 588,531 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
Re "What is "dusk" anyway?", see

Dusk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Clear as mud. Does Colorado law define "dusk" as "Civil" "Nautical" or "Astronomical"?
 
Old 12-11-2012, 02:04 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,020,003 times
Reputation: 2622
Wink The PC - and then idiotic

This is academic to many, as under the misapprehension that Colorado is northern Sweden—therefore with headlights on continually. Note to same: the sun is out (as most always), your AC is likely full on, and everyone else can see you on full PC safety alert.

Otherwise, dusk is the betwixt and between when not so fully dark you'll drive off the side of the road without the help of some artificial light, but all still vaguely familiar as it grows dimmer. In other words, a good time to begin thinking of turning the lights on. And if it might help any other driver to see you, then before then (likely not July 4th, at Noon).
 
Old 12-11-2012, 02:36 PM
 
1,561 posts, read 2,817,479 times
Reputation: 1994
From what I see on the roads, black and gray cars are exempt from headlight laws and common sense.

I find it amusing how many of these dimwits who don't turn on lights when they should have a dented bumper.
 
Old 12-11-2012, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Colorado
11,628 posts, read 7,195,062 times
Reputation: 20939
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryK123 View Post
From what I see on the roads, black and gray cars are exempt from headlight laws and common sense.

I find it amusing how many of these dimwits who don't turn on lights when they should have a dented bumper.
Dim...wits...ha! I see what you did there.

In many states where I've lived you are also supposed to have your lights on any time that your windshield wipers are in use (raining, snowing, etc.)

I have noticed any number of cars out when it is clearly dark, with no lights on. The only time I ever made the mistake of not turning on my lights at night, I left a very brightly lit gas station and was driving (in another state) on very brightly lit streets. I didn't really notice they were off for a minute...IIRC my husband noticed and said something. I can't see making that mistake here with the sporadic to nonexistent state of the street lights...
 
Old 12-12-2012, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,837,299 times
Reputation: 9316
BarryK123 wrote: I find it amusing how many of these dimwits who don't turn on lights

This behaviour is more prevalent in Colorado than anywhere else I've ever lived. Everywhere else, I could flash my lights off and on at an oncoming car driving without lights in poor lighting conditions, and they'd turn on their lights...but not in Colorado. Either they don't get the message or they don't like having an oversight pointed out.
 
Old 12-12-2012, 08:40 PM
 
40 posts, read 89,633 times
Reputation: 75
What's the difference when dusk and dawn is? Just turn on your lights when its getting dark. What kind of thread is this.
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