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Old 12-11-2012, 09:18 AM
 
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I am a brand new baby teacher from Pittsburgh Pennsylvania looking to relocate to Colorado. I don't know much about the school district or sytem. Can anyone give me some advice of where I might want to start my search or really any advice at all?

Thanks!
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:08 AM
 
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My suggestion, after confirming that your license does transfer to Colorado (Colorado is a bit difficult to transfer your license; often you will have to retake some tests, but it's also been a few years for me, but it's definitely something to look into), you go onto the CDE website and make a list of the school districts, to make sure you don't miss any. Then once or twice a week, you look for new jobs- most sites only post new jobs once a week. They'll start coming up in earnest around february or march, especially in april. The way many districts have the set up now is to have an application to the district, and then you click 'apply' for specific jobs. I also would always write the principal with a stated interest as well. Don't forget charter schools or private schools as well. The way the market currently is? I don't think we really can be picky where we work. I would look at all districts, and try to get "in" the education system quickly. There are some schools closing in the area (most likely) so hopefully those teachers will be absorbed into the district (D11) and not make things more difficult in growing areas (D20, for example)

Good luck! I know that I love teaching with new teachers. Makes me less cynical.
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBloomer13 View Post
I am a brand new baby teacher from Pittsburgh Pennsylvania looking to relocate to Colorado. I don't know much about the school district or sytem. Can anyone give me some advice of where I might want to start my search or really any advice at all?

Thanks!
Bluntly . . . look in another state. Colorado's festering fiscal problems (which I've commented upon repeatedly and won't repeat here), if nothing else, make Colorado an unattractive place for new teachers to try to establish a teaching career. There was an interesting article published recently that ranks states as to how well they are managed. If you are interested in state-supported public sector work, pick a state at the top of that list. Here is the article: The Best and Worst Run States in America: A Survey of All 50 - 24/7 Wall St.

Colorado ranks 29th on the list. The study also omits the fact the Colorado ranks near the bottom in per capita spending on education. Throwing money at education foolishly does not necessarily make for better quality education, but neither does starving it for funding.
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Na'alehu Hawaii/Buena Vista Colorado
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Why are you looking at Colorado? Is there someplace in particular you want to live? Rural or urban? Have you looked at the discussions here about cost of living and other comparisons with the east coast?

Just in the Denver metropolitan area there are perhaps seven school districts (maybe even more). You will have many happy (and informative) hours following up on Hollyt00's suggestion of checking the Colorado Department of Education's website.
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Old 12-15-2012, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,878 posts, read 102,269,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Bluntly . . . look in another state. Colorado's festering fiscal problems (which I've commented upon repeatedly and won't repeat here), if nothing else, make Colorado an unattractive place for new teachers to try to establish a teaching career. There was an interesting article published recently that ranks states as to how well they are managed. If you are interested in state-supported public sector work, pick a state at the top of that list. Here is the article: The Best and Worst Run States in America: A Survey of All 50 - 24/7 Wall St.

Colorado ranks 29th on the list. The study also omits the fact the Colorado ranks near the bottom in per capita spending on education. Throwing money at education foolishly does not necessarily make for better quality education, but neither does starving it for funding.
The OP's state has an oversupply of teachers and a "good old boy/girl" network that puts anything in CO to shame. Why shouldn't a young person follow their dreams?

And you know all about those "lists". You can prove anything if you finagle the statistics enough, not that I don't agree that CO could stand to devote more money to education.

OP-Decide where you'd like to live and apply to every district within driving distance. You'll have more options in the metro Denver area, IMO.
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Old 12-15-2012, 11:48 AM
 
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I know how statistic can be "massaged"--I do statistical analysis as part of my livelihood. However, the above-quoted study is not the only one showing Colorado's very mediocre status as to how it manages much of its public sector.

It should be noted, too, that several states near or neighboring Colorado are at the top of the well-run list: Wyoming, Nebraska, Utah, North Dakota, and Montana. Were I the OP, I would be concentrating my search in those states--if one is making a "fresh start" (not easy in the best of times), one might as well go where someplace is run well, rather than a place run half-heartedly.
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Old 12-15-2012, 11:51 AM
 
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I've often felt, as education is my career, and my children are in school, that we live in a terrible state that has such an impact on 3/4 of my family.
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,878 posts, read 102,269,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I know how statistic can be "massaged"--I do statistical analysis as part of my livelihood. However, the above-quoted study is not the only one showing Colorado's very mediocre status as to how it manages much of its public sector.

It should be noted, too, that several states near or neighboring Colorado are at the top of the well-run list: Wyoming, Nebraska, Utah, North Dakota, and Montana. Were I the OP, I would be concentrating my search in those states--if one is making a "fresh start" (not easy in the best of times), one might as well go where someplace is run well, rather than a place run half-heartedly.
Utah? Surely you jest? They have the lowest per-pupil spending in the country!

Per-pupil educational expenditures adjusted for regional cost differences - Data Across States - KIDS COUNT Data Center
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
3,768 posts, read 4,618,092 times
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I think there have been plenty of studies done that show that per-pupil spending is not an accurate way to judge the quality of an education system.

Personally if I was a teacher I would look to Wyoming not only is the state not facing cuts they are actually growing responsibly as a state right now.
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Old 12-16-2012, 06:45 AM
 
3,764 posts, read 7,447,080 times
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As a fellow teacher who has moved from state to state, the best advise I can give is get the desired state license in hand before starting the interview process.

Here is Colorado licensure info for out-of-state:

Ways to be Licensed in Colorado

Out-of-state teacher licenses cannot be used in Colorado.

Colorado does not require any additional coursework if you have met the educator preparation program requirements in the state in which you are presently licensed.

I think the best bet for a first-year teacher would be Denver. There are sometimes openings first of the new year as teachers retire or leave, so check school districts' openings online.

Do you have a SpEd credential? That will make you more marketable.
In what area is your teaching credential?

Good luck!
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