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Old 06-13-2013, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,523 posts, read 10,191,303 times
Reputation: 9752
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic_Spork View Post
I had a friend lose her home in the Waldo Canyon fire, she knew she'd lost it too, because she watched it burn on live TV.

I was listening to the police scanners yesterday. Lots of stories of police rescuing trapped animals. Dogs, horses, even chickens.

I have many family and friends out of state who look at stories and maps, and get alarmed because technically the fire is some 20 miles north of my home...and as big as it has grown they just don't see why I wouldn't be threatened by it, too. I've had to explain over and over...I just don't think there is enough fuel between there and me, for it to make it down there to the Widefield area, at all. And as tragic as it is, and as awful as I feel for everyone who is losing their home and coping with this...I am doubly happy to live where I live. We get little grass fires occasionally but our fire depts. get them out in like, minutes. I think it takes trees to sustain a big fire like this, and we simply don't have a lot of trees.
I'm not a fire fighter and I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night, but it would seem that while grass fires present their own set of challenges (mainly the extreme speed at which they move), they're somewhat easier to fight because the fuel doesn't produce the embers and spotting that a crown fire high in the treetops would.

I'd love to hear what a professional has to say about the difference between the two. I could be totally off base.

 
Old 06-13-2013, 11:16 AM
 
20,836 posts, read 39,046,511 times
Reputation: 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
This fire, Waldo Canyon, and High Park are going to force insurance providers to redo all their risk modeling and it wouldn't surprise me if folks living in high-risk forested areas see an extreme jump in their premiums over the next 2-3 years (if they haven't already).
Insurers are the ones who have to push the issue, first by raising premiums, especially on homes constructed with highly combustable materials in the danger areas. Then they can offer various discounts for homes with fire-resistant materials and/or good defensible space. Insurers are the ones who have sufficient lobbying strength to succeed at some tightening of construction standards.

These fires are not a fluke, they result from a "perfect storm" of factors:
- building in proximity to wildfire fuel sources (wooded areas)
- building with combustible materials (asphalt roof, shake shingling, vinyl siding, logs)
- insufficient defensible spaces
- complacency relative to amount of risk exposure (can't / won't happen here)
- climate warming cycle
- repetitive / long / perpetual droughts

Hopefully there'll be an insurance industry wake-up call as a result of this.
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Old 06-13-2013, 11:26 AM
 
1,742 posts, read 2,690,109 times
Reputation: 1925
Here's a good link explaining how the Incident Command System works.
Wildland Fire: Incident Command System Levels | U.S. National Park Service
 
Old 06-13-2013, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
173 posts, read 230,459 times
Reputation: 321
I moved from asphalt to a concrete tile roofed home last year, about the same square footage and amenities, and my insurance premium with USAA dropped almost 45%...an unexpected benefit of having a safer home design.
 
Old 06-13-2013, 12:57 PM
 
20,836 posts, read 39,046,511 times
Reputation: 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by YoYoSpin View Post
I moved from asphalt to a concrete tile roofed home last year, about the same square footage and amenities, and my insurance premium with USAA dropped almost 45%...an unexpected benefit of having a safer home design.
That's really cool to know!

IIRC Traveler's lowered my premiums a small amount for the better shingles.
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Old 06-13-2013, 02:35 PM
 
1,423 posts, read 2,533,892 times
Reputation: 2012
flying horse and surrounding area west of 83 is now under mandatory evac

UPDATE: New Evacuation Order Issued For Parts Of Colorado Springs
 
Old 06-13-2013, 02:50 PM
 
1,742 posts, read 2,690,109 times
Reputation: 1925
Thousands of homes now effected.
 
Old 06-13-2013, 03:26 PM
 
20,836 posts, read 39,046,511 times
Reputation: 19073
Pine Creek HS is now a staging area for National Guard troops, emergency vehicles, food services, and a small tent city. All of this is on the parking lot, I'm guessing since there's no danger of that burning, unlike the ball fields.
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Old 06-13-2013, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,948 posts, read 7,362,455 times
Reputation: 16272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Insurers are the ones who have to push the issue, first by raising premiums, especially on homes constructed with highly combustable materials in the danger areas. Then they can offer various discounts for homes with fire-resistant materials and/or good defensible space. Insurers are the ones who have sufficient lobbying strength to succeed at some tightening of construction standards.


Hopefully there'll be an insurance industry wake-up call as a result of this.
A news broadcast said that we all pay for these disasters (fire, flood, hurricane) - I in MN will pay for this fire via increased ins. premiums. A neighbor recently confirmed this - we all pay for the "cost of doing business". He kept mentioning Katrina - yes, but I live in MN - doesn't matter.
 
Old 06-13-2013, 04:15 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Garden State
2,683 posts, read 3,402,014 times
Reputation: 3536
We are all so sorry for the state of Colorado and these horrible wildfires. I visited there three years ago -- it is such a beautiful state!

Our hearts are with you.
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