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Old 06-24-2013, 04:57 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,743 posts, read 4,373,175 times
Reputation: 10403

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I don't know if they can spread enough mulch and put enough large logs in place to stop subsequent erosion after all these fires. The top soil will be carried away, making it even more difficult for native plants and trees to regenerate themselves.

 
Old 06-24-2013, 05:03 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,743 posts, read 4,373,175 times
Reputation: 10403
@ Oak1776: I see you're a newbie, so you probably don't know that the board mods have placed all posts discussing the 2013 fire season in a single thread there up at the top. Your post most likely will be moved to that thread.

I appreciate your prayers and good wishes. Unfortunately, Colorado forests are going to have a difficult time making a comeback, as has been discussed in the other thread.

Wow! That was quick, too!

Last edited by Colorado Rambler; 06-24-2013 at 05:43 PM..
 
Old 06-24-2013, 09:35 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,858,967 times
Reputation: 9139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler
Unfortunately, Colorado forests are going to have a difficult time making a comeback, as has been discussed in the other thread.
Nature adapts, it's the humans that have a problem. In the lower elevations of the spruce-fir life zone in southern Colorado, aspen will slowly colonize the burned areas. Much of Colorado's aspen forests are there because spruce-fir was either burned or logged over a century ago. In the upper elevations, large grassy "parks" will become the norm, probably for a couple of centuries or more. The flora and fauna will adapt to those new realities. That's the natural cycle. Certainly, the drought has aggravated the situation, but droughts are a regular occurrence in the Southern Rockies. Time will only tell if the warmer temperatures are a natural cyclical event (there have been plenty of those, too) or a semi-permanent change that is man-caused--or some combination of both. If anything may have problems adapting, it will be the humans. This idea that man is the master of the environment is pure crap--and always has been. Every so often Mother Nature just has to rear her head a bit, slap the hell out of us, and remind us that she is in charge--not us. This is one of those moments.
 
Old 06-25-2013, 12:37 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,743 posts, read 4,373,175 times
Reputation: 10403
Well, jl, I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree on this one. Up until now, mankind has managed to do what amounts to relatively minor damage to the environment. However what is happening in the present is happening on a vast scale. As many as a third of the species known to science may be at risk of extinction if average temperatures rise by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius. That statistic comes from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) a panel of more than 2,500 scientists and other experts. Just about every group of scientists from just about every scientific discipline have put out statements warning about the current climatic trends.

According to the American Meteorological Society: "Since long-term measurements began in the 1950s, the atmospheric CO2 concentration has been increasing at a rate much faster than at any time in the last 800,000 years. Having been introduced into the atmosphere it will take a thousand years for the majority of the added atmospheric CO2 to be removed by natural processes, and some will remain for thousands of subsequent years."

The years to come may not be pretty, and I don't see the earth sustaining the high population numbers of humankind than it does now. The loss of the forests is just the beginning.
 
Old 06-25-2013, 03:30 AM
 
13,321 posts, read 25,569,771 times
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"When the people are gone, only the dogs will care."
 
Old 06-25-2013, 12:20 PM
 
Location: augusta, ks
49 posts, read 65,847 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
@ Oak1776: I see you're a newbie, so you probably don't know that the board mods have placed all posts discussing the 2013 fire season in a single thread there up at the top. Your post most likely will be moved to that thread.

I appreciate your prayers and good wishes. Unfortunately, Colorado forests are going to have a difficult time making a comeback, as has been discussed in the other thread.

Wow! That was quick, too!

I was wondering what happen to my post. As for "Colorado forests are going to have a difficult time making a comeback", that is what was said after the 1989 Yellowstone fire and look at it now. What make you think it will have a difficult time to comeback?
 
Old 06-25-2013, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Colorado
11,883 posts, read 7,319,994 times
Reputation: 21312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oak1776 View Post
I was wondering what happen to my post. As for "Colorado forests are going to have a difficult time making a comeback", that is what was said after the 1989 Yellowstone fire and look at it now. What make you think it will have a difficult time to comeback?
I think it would be harder for Colorado's forests to recover than for Yellowstone's because of relative levels of precipitation and moisture. Yellowstone gets a lot more snow than we do, generally, if I'm not mistaken. Looking at our state and the ones nearby, we have a lot of high-plains desert...if the drought patterns hold over time, we could see a lot more of the southwest become less forested and more desert-ish. Maybe.

?
 
Old 06-25-2013, 07:54 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,858,967 times
Reputation: 9139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
The years to come may not be pretty, and I don't see the earth sustaining the high population numbers of humankind than it does now. The loss of the forests is just the beginning.
"Mother Nature bats last." Human impacts on the environment are indeed profound, and, in more ways than one, are probably exacerbating what is happening in Colorado forests now. There is no question in my mind that current human population levels worldwide are not be going to be sustainable for much longer, and Mother Nature will take care of that, too. An overpopulation of spruce trees in the area of the West Fork fire led to trees with weakened defenses against pests like bark beetles and spruce budworms. Millions upon millions of trees have died or are dying from that. Nature is just cleaning up the mess--cremating the bodies, if you will. Sooner or later, humans will get their version of budworms and beetles, and we will wind up the same way--many of us dead, with Nature disposing of our remains. It's the cycle of life, and we are part of it just like those burning forests.

"All life and glory is fleeting."

Last edited by jazzlover; 06-25-2013 at 08:41 PM..
 
Old 06-26-2013, 04:13 PM
 
922 posts, read 990,193 times
Reputation: 1077
^So Malthus will end up having the last laugh in your view?
 
Old 06-26-2013, 08:26 PM
 
Location: augusta, ks
49 posts, read 65,847 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by wong21fr View Post
^So Malthus will end up having the last laugh in your view?

Might be that.
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