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Old 06-12-2013, 09:53 AM
 
177 posts, read 235,231 times
Reputation: 169

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From the pictures it seems most of the folks do NOT have good "defenseable space" around the houses in Black Forest.

 
Old 06-12-2013, 10:01 AM
 
16,507 posts, read 20,906,955 times
Reputation: 47882
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
we could see the black forest smoke plume clearly from my house on smoky hill ridge in se aurora. I'll try to snap some photos with a real camera today.

Stay safe folks. Thoughts and prayers are with those who've had to evacuate and those who've lost their homes.

Side note - saw on the denver post website that there were folks in the black forest who refused to heed evacuation orders. This ticks me off more than anything else. If you're told to leave and you say no, you'd better not come crying for help when the fire shows up on your doorstep.

Emergency personnel have enough to deal with. They shouldn't have to bail out stubborn/arrogant fools who ignore evacuation orders. Just stick them on the dead/unaccounted for list and if they show up alive after the fire, great, and if they don't - oh well they made their choice. It may seem callous, but it's no more cruel than expecting first responders to needlessly risk their lives rescuing a lunkhead who cared more about his property than his life and those of his would-be rescuers.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^yes!^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^
 
Old 06-12-2013, 11:52 AM
 
20,840 posts, read 39,059,222 times
Reputation: 19074
Quote:
Originally Posted by lurtsman View Post
... The mansions you see are probably in black forest. Black forest is very diverse in the types of homes, and the fire is devouring it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by huffdiver View Post
From the pictures it seems most of the folks do NOT have good "defenseable space" around the houses in Black Forest.
Search on google maps for 13215 Peregrine Circle, 80908 to see the area. That home and those around it got wiped out early yesterday afternoon and you may see that exact house in some of the aerial films on the news. Was able to spot it on google maps based on the pool and the unique curved walls. That house just traded hands six months ago for @$750k (back in Fairfax County, VA that would've been a $3M property).

As the crow flies, that house is 2 miles NNE of Pine Creek HS.
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Old 06-12-2013, 12:44 PM
 
2,514 posts, read 3,487,858 times
Reputation: 5069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Search on google maps for 13215 Peregrine Circle, 80908 to see the area. That home and those around it got wiped out early yesterday afternoon and you may see that exact house in some of the aerial films on the news. Was able to spot it on google maps based on the pool and the unique curved walls. That house just traded hands six months ago for @$750k (back in Fairfax County, VA that would've been a $3M property).

As the crow flies, that house is 2 miles NNE of Pine Creek HS.
On zillow.com you can still see the inside pics. of the house from when it sold. The trees don't look that big. I wonder when the area last burned.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Corona
10,063 posts, read 13,951,849 times
Reputation: 8887
Great another summer I wouldn't be able to have a fire at RMNP. This state is losing it's value year by year.

And yes I am sorry to all those truly affected.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 02:50 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,020,776 times
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Wink New Mexico as Colorado in part

'A tree’s structure has a lot to do with how it handles fire, Gass said. Ponderosa pine, a species adapted to frequent fires, has thick bark, and the older ones doesn’t usually have branches near the ground. Historically, that prevented fire from getting into the tree crowns where it could leap quickly through a forest. The pine’s roots also run deep, preventing a blaze from damaging them unless it is wickedly hot.

Spruce and fir trees have thin bark, Gass said, and they don’t lose their dead branches near the ground as they grow old. Their roots also lie close to the ground surface. “So when fires come through, the trees die because their bark is thin and their roots are near surface where they burn. They carry fire so fast.”
[1]



In New Mexico, the Tres Lagunas Fire has been 60% contained, having burned 10,040 acres north of Pecos, NM (in the Pecos Wilderness, east of Santa Fe). NM 63, being the only road access into that canyon, has been provisionally reopened to the public.

Meanwhile, the far larger Thompson Ridge Fire in the Valles Caldera, west of Los Alamos, NM, is but 40% contained, having thus far burned 21,089 acres. It is significant in being one of the more beautiful mountain areas of New Mexico; various movies have been filmed there in part, as well as one television series currently in production (Longmire).

With the Tres Lagunas Fire more or less in control, northwest of there the Jarosa Fire has recently sprung up. As of yesterday it had more than tripled in size, to 1,500 acres. The behavior of this wildfire has been extreme.


The Jaroso Fire is significant as burning into higher elevation areas which have not experienced wildfire in perhaps 500 years.

In the Pecos Wilderness of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Ponderosa pine predominate at lower elevations. With thick bark and resilient, they are accustomed to low intensity wildfires every few years that clear out smaller trees and underbrush. That was the natural pattern for something like seven centuries back, until about 100 years ago with the advent of grazing and other man-made interventions to this natural cycle.

At higher elevations sub-alpine fir and Engelmann spruce are dominant. They can grow thickly to elevations above 10,000 feet. This is a wetter and colder ecosystem not accustomed to periodic wildfire. Those that occur can wipe out entire forests, and game changing for centuries. Santa Fe Baldy peak, for instance, is as such due one of these wildfires.

The cited article could prove of interest to those wishing to more fully understand the ecology of these wildfires.

Forests in the Black Forest area are principally of pine. Ponderosa and other species of pine inhabit the region of Estes Park and lower reaches of the east side of Rocky Mountain National Park. Whereas lodgepole pine and other species tend to inhabit the wetter west side near Grand Lake. The highest elevations of RMNP are of course truly alpine; it is an entirely different ecosystem from all lower elevations. Trees in the sub-alpine region growing as high in elevation as they might are of fir and other species adapted to this colder and wetter environment.

Each region and elevation will prove different in the species that prefer it, and in each case how adapted to wildfire.

1) 'Ecologist: Jaroso Fire has potential to change landscape,' The Santa Fe New Mexican
Ecologist: Jaroso Fire has potential to change landscape - The Santa Fe New Mexican: Local News
 
Old 06-12-2013, 03:07 PM
 
1,742 posts, read 2,690,649 times
Reputation: 1925
5,700 homes under voluntary evacuation. This might march up to Castlerock.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 03:24 PM
 
1 posts, read 975 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado xxxxx View Post
This state is losing it's value year by year.
It may be that we see this every year. The climates of the world appear to be rapidy changing. Next year, or even this, RMNP may go up in flames.

Colorado and the west are getting a taste of what the future may hold. NYC is bracing for rising sea levels, so it's something which affects everyone even if Colorado and Australia are seeing the first effects. Interesting times.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Corona
10,063 posts, read 13,951,849 times
Reputation: 8887
Quote:
Originally Posted by proveick View Post
5,700 homes under voluntary evacuation. This might march up to Castlerock.
I called South Metro and they said there is no concern for CR or Parker.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 03:46 PM
 
1,742 posts, read 2,690,649 times
Reputation: 1925
Year by year I can see the entire front range going up in flames. We're a tinder box.
5,700 homes could be 15,000 - 20,000 people. Where do they go?
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