U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-12-2013, 03:54 PM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,943 posts, read 7,304,660 times
Reputation: 1698

Advertisements

I've been here all my life, I've never seen it this bad.m times are changing indeed.

 
Old 06-12-2013, 04:01 PM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,943 posts, read 7,304,660 times
Reputation: 1698
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
We could see the Black Forest smoke plume clearly from my house on Smoky Hill Ridge in SE Aurora. I'll try to snap some photos with a real camera today.

Stay safe folks. Thoughts and prayers are with those who've had to evacuate and those who've lost their homes.

Side note - Saw on the Denver Post website that there were folks in the Black Forest who refused to heed evacuation orders. This ticks me off more than anything else. If you're told to leave and you say no, you'd better not come crying for help when the fire shows up on your doorstep.

Emergency personnel have enough to deal with. They shouldn't have to bail out stubborn/arrogant fools who ignore evacuation orders. Just stick them on the dead/unaccounted for list and if they show up alive after the fire, great, and if they don't - oh well they made their choice. It may seem callous, but it's no more cruel than expecting first responders to needlessly risk their lives rescuing a lunkhead who cared more about his property than his life and those of his would-be rescuers.
I know it's always a possibility, but Black Forest was the last place I expected a fire to erupt. At least the silver lining is that it's not in the mountains, makes it much easier to contain and fight.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 05:38 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,697 posts, read 4,333,575 times
Reputation: 10278
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
I know it's always a possibility, but Black Forest was the last place I expected a fire to erupt. At least the silver lining is that it's not in the mountains, makes it much easier to contain and fight.
You're kidding, right? I'm surprised Black Forest hasn't burned down about 6 times over by now. When people first started building out there, they left all those nice trees, plus there's been big time fire suppression - understandable enough, but it has led to a dry forest of pine sticks just waiting to go up in flames. The Colorado State Forest Service and other agencies have been trying to get BF residents to thin out the trees on their properties with only limited success. My prayers go out to the Black Forest folks, but you can't say they weren't warned.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Corona
10,063 posts, read 13,951,849 times
Reputation: 8887
I hope all of these poor victims learn and build with brick or concrete. I feel very bad for them.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,527 posts, read 10,197,404 times
Reputation: 9757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado xxxxx View Post
I hope all of these poor victims learn and build with brick or concrete. I feel very bad for them.
Even then it's not foolproof. If the roof is composite with wood trusses hot embers can catch the roof on fire and the house will still burn down.

The house can also burn down without having so much as an ember touch it. If the fire gets close enough to the house, flammable objects like curtains can spontaneously combust due to the staggering amount of radiant heat.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 06:43 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,783,192 times
Reputation: 9132
Nothing surprising here. It is the collision of two very dry winters, decades of fire suppression, along with the lack of any coherent land use policy that would prevent residential structures from being built in areas nearly certain to burn every few decades or less. Nature may start the process, but it is collective greed and stupidity that, once again, has put life and property in peril. And it's only the second week in June. Weehee, we may be in for one hell of a fire season.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
173 posts, read 230,709 times
Reputation: 321
Default Black Forrest Homes destroyed as of 6/12 pm

Using the Sheriff Dept's list of 90 + destroyed homes in Black Forest from earlier today (6/12), I've plotted the locations of these homes on Goggle Maps. Here's the link: https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF&msa=0&msid=211912034881053785584.0004def d6919f7538c9be

The complete list can be viewed here: http://media.graytvinc.com/documents...Residences.pdf

And here is a screen shot of the Goggle Map:
Attached Thumbnails
Official Thread for all 2013 Colorado Fire Season Topics-bff1.jpg  

Last edited by YoYoSpin; 06-12-2013 at 07:09 PM..
 
Old 06-12-2013, 07:36 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,020,776 times
Reputation: 2622
Wink Design of greater forces

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado xxxxx View Post
I hope all of these poor victims learn and build with brick or concrete. I feel very bad for them.

Not an entirely untenable proposition. Although very few structures are built to withstand as much.

I recall seeing the home of one fellow, as I recall in Florida near the coast, with the structure built entirely of concrete. In shape it was as if he he buried a large ball in the ground, with only about the top quarter showing above ground. There was nothing subterranean about it, no basement, and all designed to withstand high water and so forth; all windows were inset and protected. But in its smooth uniform curves no hurricane or anything else would ever be able to get a purchase on it.

Many mining camps were built near entirely of wood, this an improvement over the canvas tents they began with. But as found from time to time, not a perfect solution, with perhaps the better part of the town in a moment lost to fire. Nor a wildfire needed, just someone careless with a stove or something. Creede, CO suffered such a fate in 1892, thus one reason many of its surviving buildings constructed of stone and brick.

Some solutions in the California gold country went beyond only brick. In the town of Murphys several of the buildings, including the hotel still in operation, were built not only of stone but with iron shutters which could be closed over every window in such an event. That can still be seen and touched to this day.

The Denver Post has a number of photos of the results of this Black Forest Fire. One thing notable is that the forest did not burn completely, even when all residences in an area did. Some photos show large swaths of charred trees, yet adjacent the trees all green and largely untouched—but every residence within them burned to the ground.

It would seem no home in that area, no matter how expensive or extravagant, was designed to withstand a serious wildfire. And notable as well that at least some of these residences had followed prescribed clearing of vegetation and so forth from around the residence—to no avail.

I saw at least one eyewitness on the news that said when that wildfire came through there that nothing was going to stop it, or spare any home (well, at least as built and existing).
 
Old 06-12-2013, 11:01 PM
gn3
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
151 posts, read 368,643 times
Reputation: 164
I'm sorry about the grief and property damage experienced, but I too am not at all surprised about this fire. I drove through there last summer, noting how extremely dry and stressed it seemed. Common around here, but it seemed worst in Black Forest somehow. Most of that that forest is relatively new, having been wiped out over a short period of time, and also homogenous and relatively dense. Given the history, thinning of trees around houses wouldn't have prevented the fire, but would have resulted in fewer homes lost.

I go around near my home area, and see the same thing: lots of moderate to large ponderosa pines right next to residences. Ugh.
 
Old 06-12-2013, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Clay Center, KS
400 posts, read 399,413 times
Reputation: 633
Pictures from day 1

Tinseltown E. Cheyenne Mountain Blvd


Woodmen/N Academy
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:42 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top