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Old 01-09-2013, 06:40 AM
 
68 posts, read 148,580 times
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Luckily we have two feet in our forest Though jazz was saying something about the soil being SO dry it may not even take the melt in Spring. That would be a bummer?
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Old 01-09-2013, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Colorado
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Like the Western Slope the front range obviously is experiencing some form of climate change. Within the last several years I have seen rattle snakes at higher elevations than previously observed, wild flowers tend to get an earlier start, and coyotes seem to be breeding earlier. Perhaps I am just noticing a blip on the radar or refering to more anecdotal type scenerios, but Colorado's climate along the front range does appear to be changing(warmer,dryer) to this layman.
My family used to own rather extensive acreage in Grand Valley, Parachute; my elders have told me stories about a resevoir that used to exist near Rifle that provided irrigation to vast fruit orchards. now gone..dried up(failed BLM oasis) The family still has quite a few robust apricot,peach,cherry, and apple orchards, but a combination of factors has returned most of the area back to grease weed. The cottonwoods,smoke trees(can't remeber their botanical phylum name) in remote arroyas and Pinyon near Silt and Rifle have been dying as well. Just like Colorado's economy, the plant life can be boom and bust here.

Interesting thread.
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Old 01-10-2013, 10:43 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,697 posts, read 4,327,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott5280 View Post
Like the Western Slope the front range obviously is experiencing some form of climate change. Within the last several years I have seen rattle snakes at higher elevations than previously observed, wild flowers tend to get an earlier start, and coyotes seem to be breeding earlier. Perhaps I am just noticing a blip on the radar or refering to more anecdotal type scenerios, but Colorado's climate along the front range does appear to be changing(warmer,dryer) to this layman.
My family used to own rather extensive acreage in Grand Valley, Parachute; my elders have told me stories about a resevoir that used to exist near Rifle that provided irrigation to vast fruit orchards. now gone..dried up(failed BLM oasis) The family still has quite a few robust apricot,peach,cherry, and apple orchards, but a combination of factors has returned most of the area back to grease weed. The cottonwoods,smoke trees(can't remeber their botanical phylum name) in remote arroyas and Pinyon near Silt and Rifle have been dying as well. Just like Colorado's economy, the plant life can be boom and bust here.

Interesting thread.
Good input - thanks! I grew up in Colorado Springs, and I can say for a fact that the climate on the Front Range has changed. The Springs used to get more snow in the winter and the summers were cooler than they are now. I've spotted road runners a couple of times on the stretch of road between the Springs and Canyon City. Wait a moment - aren't road runners supposed to hang out further south, down in New Mexico? Not anymore. Another import from New Mexico - bubonic plague - is now carried by some squirrels in Colorado Springs. The yucca plants are blooming closer to the beginning of June instead of more towards the end of the month as was once the norm.

I'm expecting to wake up to the sight of saguaros and armadillos any day now.

Out here, farmers and ranchers are complaining about the way the price of hay has gone through the roof, thanks to the on-going drought. It's no wonder that people have to take out a loan from the bank to buy a few steaks for dinner!

BTW, I think your "smoke trees" are tamarix, also known as "salt cedar."
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Old 01-11-2013, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Colorado
2,561 posts, read 5,007,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
Good input - thanks! I grew up in Colorado Springs, and I can say for a fact that the climate on the Front Range has changed. The Springs used to get more snow in the winter and the summers were cooler than they are now. I've spotted road runners a couple of times on the stretch of road between the Springs and Canyon City. Wait a moment - aren't road runners supposed to hang out further south, down in New Mexico? Not anymore. Another import from New Mexico - bubonic plague - is now carried by some squirrels in Colorado Springs. The yucca plants are blooming closer to the beginning of June instead of more towards the end of the month as was once the norm.

I'm expecting to wake up to the sight of saguaros and armadillos any day now.

Out here, farmers and ranchers are complaining about the way the price of hay has gone through the roof, thanks to the on-going drought. It's no wonder that people have to take out a loan from the bank to buy a few steaks for dinner!

BTW, I think your "smoke trees" are tamarix, also known as "salt cedar."
Yes, just waiting for a few California fan palms to start lining the canyons near Trinidad LOL. I have heard people talk about road runners appearing in SO CO. so it's very cool you have actually seen them, maybe they are feeding on the increasing number of lizards. Thanks for the refresher on the tamarix, I see quite a between St. George Utah and Vegas in between the joshua trees. Speaking of fan palms and jushua trees; there is a guy in SW. Denver who has giant varieties of both in his yard. He builds giant plastic enclosures during really cold weather for the twenty foot washington robustas and washinton filfera. Saw him last year in February with his bobcat lowering a twelve foot Phoenix Robelini(date palm) into his yard. What is really astonshing to me is that some of these plants actually survive. I'll try to take pics. and post..it's freaking hillarious.
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Old 01-11-2013, 03:44 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,697 posts, read 4,327,280 times
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I look forward to those pix of date palms growing in Denver. At last - a tree that can grow in Colorado despite the drought!
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