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Old 01-22-2013, 12:08 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,510,199 times
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I think all of you are missing a big point. Many wealthy people engage in activities an eat at restaurants an ski and buy expensive conspicuous products to be exclusive. If the products or activities become too inexpensive then they lose the exclusivity that it can only be acquired or done by them who have money. Consequently it loses the value for them to maintain their status if the masses of those "others" can do those activities or buy those products.

The ski industry knows that the big bucks are made by selling to the wealthy who have no problem paying these high prices. They know it gives the status they deserve and drives out the lower and poorer class which the wealthy really do not want an association. Certainly, there has much animosity against the snowboarders who with their dress and crude behavior that destroys the elite nature of skiing. If you have a knowledge of skiing of the past, especially in places such as St. Moritz, you will realize it was very much a sport for the wealthy and the it was priced high so as to have a defacto discrimination against the lower dirty classes of society.

The Colorado Ski industry is following that formula to establish that exclusivity by raising prices to a point that the world wide wealthy will find these resorts as worthy of their money. If it becomes too cheap to attract those of limited means than it does not covey the status that they crave.

It is the same I have saw in many years in restaurants. If you make the prices too low then it drives away the status seekers of wealth. Also, Cars, Clothing, Housing are are priced high to the wealthy to maintain the status of exclusivity.

Livecontent
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Old 01-22-2013, 12:23 PM
 
1,742 posts, read 2,690,109 times
Reputation: 1925
The Mountain Club at CB
Is this exclusive enough?
FULL Membership Overview 2012-13
Price: $10,500
With the goal of inspiring the passion of local owners and visitors in the valley, the Crested Butte
Mountain Club provides convenient, personalized and unique access, a connection with the place and
the resort and camaraderie among friends.
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:00 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,185,649 times
Reputation: 3351
Quote:
Originally Posted by proveick View Post

I'm PROUDLY a member of the "front range riff raff". The big ski areas both love us and hate us.
They need the reliable cash flow of the huge number of local skiers who ski November to April.
But the real profit is in the wealthy out of town tourists that only ski holidays and spring.
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:15 PM
 
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How about $80,000 for a season pass?
The World's Most Expensive Ski Pass for $80,000
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,139 posts, read 5,631,447 times
Reputation: 952
Funny no one has mentioned the lack of snow.
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:53 PM
 
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Here are some numbers, looks like a steep decline.
http://www.coloradoski.com/uploads/1...ru%2011-12.pdf
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Old 01-22-2013, 02:36 PM
 
Location: on a hill
346 posts, read 391,656 times
Reputation: 454
I stick to the old school ski areas, not resorts leveraged with their ostentatious real estate ventures/land grabs. On a good day, for example, I'll head up to A Basin, Loveland, or Eldora, start a 8:30, and ski staright thru to @ 2 and head home, beating the worst traffic.
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Old 01-22-2013, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Cole neighborhood, Denver, CO
1,123 posts, read 2,445,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lalahartma View Post
Funny no one has mentioned the lack of snow.
Because it is a strawman argument. Very rarely to out-of-town visitors compare snow totals year-by-year when planning to visit. It is about COST.
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Old 01-22-2013, 05:50 PM
 
384 posts, read 505,417 times
Reputation: 833
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I think all of you are missing a big point. Many wealthy people engage in activities an eat at restaurants an ski and buy expensive conspicuous products to be exclusive. If the products or activities become too inexpensive then they lose the exclusivity that it can only be acquired or done by them who have money. Consequently it loses the value for them to maintain their status if the masses of those "others" can do those activities or buy those products.

The ski industry knows that the big bucks are made by selling to the wealthy who have no problem paying these high prices. They know it gives the status they deserve and drives out the lower and poorer class which the wealthy really do not want an association. Certainly, there has much animosity against the snowboarders who with their dress and crude behavior that destroys the elite nature of skiing. If you have a knowledge of skiing of the past, especially in places such as St. Moritz, you will realize it was very much a sport for the wealthy and the it was priced high so as to have a defacto discrimination against the lower dirty classes of society.

The Colorado Ski industry is following that formula to establish that exclusivity by raising prices to a point that the world wide wealthy will find these resorts as worthy of their money. If it becomes too cheap to attract those of limited means than it does not covey the status that they crave.

It is the same I have saw in many years in restaurants. If you make the prices too low then it drives away the status seekers of wealth. Also, Cars, Clothing, Housing are are priced high to the wealthy to maintain the status of exclusivity.

Livecontent
If the Colorado Ski Industry only relied on Super Wealthy people for revenue, there would be a lot of used ski lifts for sale the following year.
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Old 01-22-2013, 06:04 PM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,525,426 times
Reputation: 7602
Quote:
Originally Posted by proveick View Post
From Tripadvisor:
Wow, no wonder the numbers are declining. Ouch.
To calculate an average ski day, TripAdvisor added together the average cost of a hotel room, the average price of a (basic) daily ski rental, the average cost of a lift ticket, a burger and fries, and a beer. The result? One day at Vail, according to the budget travel website, rings in at a whopping $745.56. By far, TripAdvisor's most expensive (estimated) component is average lodging: $581.81 per night.
I remember 10 years ago Vail Resorts was circulating numbers that the average cost for a family of 4 for a week of skiing, all costs including was around $10,000. That was when lift tickets were around $60 I recall.

In terms of snow that has always come and go. I don't believe all the hokey global warming garbage. Just 2 seasons ago Vail recorded it's highest snowfall ever and had several heavy winters from 2005 onwards.

Like back when the weather changed it's 30-40 year cycle in the late 70's, early 80's, these ski towns had several lean years on snow then too. It's a part of the business, just like any other business dependent on weather.

In regards to costs, depends how you work it. Peak times are more costly. Transportation costs vary depending on where you come from. Food and shopping costs are up to you. If you want to stay next to the lifts and eat high end restaurants and shop, it's going to cost you. If you want to budget your costs and not act like a celebrity, it can be done about the same as any reasonable vacation in the USA.

What I saw in Vail is that it's still doing business, maybe not what it was, but there are still people skiing and many will continue to do so. I do have the feeling skiing and boarding is getting a bit fuddy duddy and the latest fad/boom is over for now and probably 10-15 years down the road winter sports will be cool again. I think it's all cyclical. I felt the sport boomed in the 1960's, 1980's and 2000's and like anything it gets a bit tired and old and then will renew itself and be back again.
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