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Old 01-25-2013, 12:07 PM
 
1,742 posts, read 2,686,077 times
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The most ski days I know of is from my aunt in Aspen.
She's skied 100+ days / season since 1981. Give or take 3,200 days.
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:11 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,008,682 times
Reputation: 2620
Wink Dude, what is wrong with you?

Do I smell a whiff of sour milk tinted as envy?

Many of us may get the majority of our skiing days in when younger, yet no reason not to bemoan the loss—or think less of those who have somehow managed to get many skiing days in every season. Yeah, some of them may be near total dinks, but inevitably willing to pay a price in a variety of ways others are not. And before one might too readily make judgements in what is important in life, then perhaps remember back to that perfect day or run when in a moment of pure health under achingly blue skies, but a wisp of a breeze of crisp fresh air to breath in, life in that moment seemed perfect and complete. Who would not have that? And although life a rich and multi-faceted pageant, also at times with much we would just as soon have avoided if possible. And to an extent it is, if keenly focused on what best defines the good life. If naturally that subjective and will vary in individual estimation.

Speaking of losers, Ernie Blake devoted his life to skiing. Having grown up near St. Moritz, Switzerland, the political situation in Europe necessitated his emigration to the United States in 1938. From New York City he soon decamped to Aspen, Colorado. And so on. He is a guy who made it a point to get a lot of skiing in throughout his long life. He is also the one who from Santa Fe, NM saw the possibilities of a ski area near Taos, and thereafter created one there. He so much embodied Taos Ski Valley that his determination that Taos remain a pure ski area was honored for years after his death in 1989, at the age of 75. If now snowboarding is allowed.

At one time the head honcho at A-Basin broke his leg, and had it in a full cast from foot to thigh. That didn't stop him from skiing, and on one ski down the most gnarly black diamond slopes serviced by the Pallavicini chair lift, and in better form than most of the intermediates on the blues off Norway. Like Blake, he took his skiing seriously, and made a life of it.

For a good many others of us, our enthusiasm may not be as great, or access to the slopes as easy. But here again there are various ways, if determined. One thing to avoid if possible would be living in Denver, or indeed anywhere involving much of a commute to the slopes. Proximity is key in this, and there really is nothing like steeping out the door to no more than simply ski down to meet the closest lift; this is entirely possible in some circumstances (if not inexpensively met in a place like Breckenridge).

Naturally doing so will require some adjustments, not least in finding a way to live in mountain communities which often impose a higher cost of living. Right there is a sacrifice many are not willing to make. They have lives all the parameters of which are better met along the Front Range or in other urban environments. Fair enough, obviously their priority is not skiing. When it is, then one will wish to reside as close to the mountain as possible.

Some will figure the best way to meet this is to make their money elsewhere, and some few of them are the ones who can actually afford multi-million ski chalets in Aspen and other choice locals slope side. Others without such skills and advantages, but as much determination, may get even more days of skiing in because they are there and very much focused on being so. They do not have the flash or cash, but the real aficionado is known by those perhaps unassuming but as readily apparent having in some way and form found a way to live in the mountains and often on the slopes.

Another way to approach this is as sabbatical. If often easier to accomplish when young and less overwhelmed with responsibilities, anyone might aim for as much, somehow. Again, the objective is to be in a position to ski and do as much nearly every day throughout the season. Those finding but perhaps a week or so maybe once a year for this activity, and wondering why they never much improve, will never understand what even but a few runs a day, every day, will do to increase both their confidence and skill. It may be but a year out of one's life, and indeed more like six months, if perhaps measured in years of preparation towards it—but surely an experience always remembered and treasured.

What more might one want than a life defined as moments of all that most loved? In broad brushstrokes of dark evergreen against whitest snow and blue sky some find this, and in the nuance of just the right color here and there knowing in that moment and many others found perfectly content.

Last edited by Idunn; 01-25-2013 at 04:24 PM..
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:35 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,490,262 times
Reputation: 6922
Idunn,

I liked your well written post. It made me want to read, slowly, to better absorb the nuances of your writing; able to learn a little and understand some. I do not totally "get it" and I do not totally agree but who says I only have to like that which I only have an agreement.

Livecontent
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,815,081 times
Reputation: 9316
fromalderaan wrote: Do something really impressive and then we'll talk.

Like everything else, doing something impressive is in the eye of the beholder. What you consider to be an impressive deed, may be something that the hardcore skier ( and many others ) consider rather mundane. If the hardcore skier is in a state of bliss out there on the slopes, that's one less person contributing to the war mentality so pervasive on this planet.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:51 PM
 
19 posts, read 31,646 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
fromalderaan wrote: Do something really impressive and then we'll talk.

Like everything else, doing something impressive is in the eye of the beholder. What you consider to be an impressive deed, may be something that the hardcore skier ( and many others ) consider rather mundane. If the hardcore skier is in a state of bliss out there on the slopes, that's one less person contributing to the war mentality so pervasive on this planet.
Nope. It is like porn. You know it when you see it. And WTF are you talking about with war mentality?

And sorry Idunn, I tried to read your novel of a post but honestly didn't make it past the first paragraph. I must need to hit the bong before reading these esoteric posts.
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Old 02-01-2013, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Colorado
59 posts, read 93,365 times
Reputation: 134
I'm 24, have a job, and get to ski or snowboard any day I want. You didn't mention your career keeping you in Denver as the reason for not wanting to ski along I-70 in your first post I replied to. I agree, I-70 is a mess, especially on weekends. The post I replied to, sounded like traffic was the only thing keeping you from skiing so I presented alternatives without knowing the other part of the scenario.

For some of us, skiing is a higher priority than it is for others. If I still lived in the Denver metro, I personally would either deal with the traffic or still come down to CB or another of the further out places to get my turns on every weekend possible. I'm fortunate to be able to live here and reap the rewards of it. I'll do the same thing this summer -- climb and mountain bike every day possible. When I was in the Denver metro last summer I had to drive farther to find my kind of bike trails/parks, but it was worth every minute for me.

To each their own. Cheers.
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:48 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,739,484 times
Reputation: 9129
I have been saying for several years that the Colorado ski industry has moved from being an economically "mature" industry to one in decline. For anyone with some knowledge of economics, all the signs are there: thinning profit margins, predatory competition, thinning customer base. Population and economic demographics are working against the industry, and now even climate trends appear to be actively working against it.

Facts is facts. The American population is aging and the prime customer base of the ski industry--the Baby Boomers--are entering their sunset years. Younger people often do not have the interest in outdoor sports that their parents did, and younger skiers are not replacing the older ones at a rate to keep the ski areas' customer base robust. Add to that the continuing erosion of discretionary spending power in the middle class that makes up a majority chunk of the skiing population, and the long-term decline of the skier customer base is even more stark. Finally, climate and weather is just not cooperating very well to sustain the industry. Many long-term climate models are showing significant enough potential warming to shorten the Colorado ski season by 30 days or more--that amount being enough in and of itself to throw many ski areas into economic non-viability.

Now, the decline of the Colorado ski industry--like most industries in decline--will not be even, either in time nor in effect on individual ski areas. My personal view is that the areas most likely to survive will be at opposite ends of the current Colorado ski industry makeup. At one end will be the ultra "high-end" ski areas that cater to the very wealthy. Aspen and Telluride are the main two that fit that bill. The "one-percenters" will still have the money to pursue the "sport" of skiing and will likely be able to keep the high-end areas afloat. A wild card in that will be the "climate thing." Both Aspen and Telluride (the prime examples) have climatic profiles that may make them very susceptible to snow disruption due to climatic warming. How that plays out may dictate their long-term survival. At the other end of the scale will be the "day" ski areas close to the Denver metro area that are not reliant on real estate development for their financial survival. They have always sort of had the "bastard child" syndrome--unable to "fly high" financially nor able to cultivate the mystique of the destination resorts. In the years ahead, though, they will be the likely economic survivors in the industry because there is a large middle-class customer base that might actually be able to afford to patronize them, and they will not have to depend on distant tourists to keep them alive.

The attrition of the other ski areas into difficulty and likely oblivion will likely begin with the more remote ski areas that cater mainly to a middle-class customer base. As the economic constrictions on the middle class increase (and they are going to), many of the larger ski areas thought "too big to fail" will start sliding into increasingly serious financial difficulties and decline. Some of those may fail altogether, but even those that survive will be a shadow of their former selves.

Along with all of this will come a huge crash in the recreational real estate market--especially in condos and timeshares. We're already getting a taste of this, but I suspect that what will be coming within a few years will pale current pains in the real estate market to insignificance.

All of this that I've said will engender all nature of "that won't happen," "that can't happen," or "that won't happen here" comments. A lot of people said the same thing just prior to Silver Panic of 1893 that crashed the Colorado mountain economy in most places for about a half-century. Well, demographics and overoptimism has built another huge economic bubble in the Colorado mountains that is about to burst.
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Old 02-01-2013, 09:14 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,689 posts, read 4,311,209 times
Reputation: 10252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado^ View Post
Back country for the win!
WHOOO HOOO!

I went from being Front Range trash at Ski Broadmoor (Yes, Virginia. Once upon a time the Broadmoor Hotel in the Springs had its own ski area) to back country. No fancy outfits, no long lines, no high priced lift tickets. Just blue jeans and gaitors and my Mom's old wood Swiss mountaineering ski's from the late '40's. Up yours, Telluride!
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Old 02-01-2013, 09:23 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,689 posts, read 4,311,209 times
Reputation: 10252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
Do I smell a whiff of sour milk tinted as envy?

Many of us may get the majority of our skiing days in when younger, yet no reason not to bemoan the lossóor think less of those who have somehow managed to get many skiing days in every season. Yeah, some of them may be near total dinks, but inevitably willing to pay a price in a variety of ways others are not. And before one might too readily make judgements in what is important in life, then perhaps remember back to that perfect day or run when in a moment of pure health under achingly blue skies, but a wisp of a breeze of crisp fresh air to breath in, life in that moment seemed perfect and complete. Who would not have that? And although life a rich and multi-faceted pageant, also at times with much we would just as soon have avoided if possible. And to an extent it is, if keenly focused on what best defines the good life. If naturally that subjective and will vary in individual estimation.

Speaking of losers, Ernie Blake devoted his life to skiing. Having grown up near St. Moritz, Switzerland, the political situation in Europe necessitated his emigration to the United States in 1938. From New York City he soon decamped to Aspen, Colorado. And so on. He is a guy who made it a point to get a lot of skiing in throughout his long life. He is also the one who from Santa Fe, NM saw the possibilities of a ski area near Taos, and thereafter created one there. He so much embodied Taos Ski Valley that his determination that Taos remain a pure ski area was honored for years after his death in 1989, at the age of 75. If now snowboarding is allowed.

At one time the head honcho at A-Basin broke his leg, and had it in a full cast from foot to thigh. That didn't stop him from skiing, and on one ski down the most gnarly black diamond slopes serviced by the Pallavicini chair lift, and in better form than most of the intermediates on the blues off Norway. Like Blake, he took his skiing seriously, and made a life of it.

For a good many others of us, our enthusiasm may not be as great, or access to the slopes as easy. But here again there are various ways, if determined. One thing to avoid if possible would be living in Denver, or indeed anywhere involving much of a commute to the slopes. Proximity is key in this, and there really is nothing like steeping out the door to no more than simply ski down to meet the closest lift; this is entirely possible in some circumstances (if not inexpensively met in a place like Breckenridge).

Naturally doing so will require some adjustments, not least in finding a way to live in mountain communities which often impose a higher cost of living. Right there is a sacrifice many are not willing to make. They have lives all the parameters of which are better met along the Front Range or in other urban environments. Fair enough, obviously their priority is not skiing. When it is, then one will wish to reside as close to the mountain as possible.

Some will figure the best way to meet this is to make their money elsewhere, and some few of them are the ones who can actually afford multi-million ski chalets in Aspen and other choice locals slope side. Others without such skills and advantages, but as much determination, may get even more days of skiing in because they are there and very much focused on being so. They do not have the flash or cash, but the real aficionado is known by those perhaps unassuming but as readily apparent having in some way and form found a way to live in the mountains and often on the slopes.

Another way to approach this is as sabbatical. If often easier to accomplish when young and less overwhelmed with responsibilities, anyone might aim for as much, somehow. Again, the objective is to be in a position to ski and do as much nearly every day throughout the season. Those finding but perhaps a week or so maybe once a year for this activity, and wondering why they never much improve, will never understand what even but a few runs a day, every day, will do to increase both their confidence and skill. It may be but a year out of one's life, and indeed more like six months, if perhaps measured in years of preparation towards itóbut surely an experience always remembered and treasured.

What more might one want than a life defined as moments of all that most loved? In broad brushstrokes of dark evergreen against whitest snow and blue sky some find this, and in the nuance of just the right color here and there knowing in that moment and many others found perfectly content.
Very nicely written. Enjoyed reading that.

Speaking of Ernie Blake, my own Swiss mother went cross country until she was well into her 70's. I hope I have inherited even half of her Swiss stamina. I know I have her same love for the mountains!
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Old 02-04-2013, 09:24 AM
 
Location: 5280 above liquid
356 posts, read 512,524 times
Reputation: 383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
WHOOO HOOO!

I went from being Front Range trash at Ski Broadmoor (Yes, Virginia. Once upon a time the Broadmoor Hotel in the Springs had its own ski area) to back country. No fancy outfits, no long lines, no high priced lift tickets. Just blue jeans and gaitors and my Mom's old wood Swiss mountaineering ski's from the late '40's. Up yours, Telluride!
Tell me you got a touring partner and a working beacon attached to those Blue Jeans..
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