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Old 02-08-2013, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Corona
10,057 posts, read 13,934,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepiff View Post
Good news everyone. We are coming there the middle of March. We are planning a week long trip to check out ABQ, Cosprings, and Pueblo! We will be driving so we will be able to check everything out. If we go there in March, that will give us plenty of time to make a final decision before August. Thanks again for all of your input. If there is anything super special in any of these places that we can't miss, please feel free to post
The Springs would be better FYI alot of religious type and military. Nice landscape and windy, but not brown like Pueblo.
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Old 02-09-2013, 10:41 AM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,938 posts, read 7,298,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado xxxxx View Post
The Springs would be better FYI alot of religious type and military. Nice landscape and windy, but not brown like Pueblo.

FYI, they don't call Pueblo "Brown Town" because of the brown grass everywhere....
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Old 02-09-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,173 posts, read 20,946,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
FYI, they don't call Pueblo "Brown Town" because of the brown grass everywhere....
Then enlighten us. Why do "they" call it the "brown city"?

Last edited by Josseppie; 02-09-2013 at 11:49 AM..
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Old 02-09-2013, 12:20 PM
 
Location: The 719
14,469 posts, read 22,321,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
FYI, they don't call Pueblo "Brown Town" because of the brown grass everywhere....
Oh really? Why do they call it that, ryanek9freak?

Btw, Springs is just as brown if not browner than Pueblo. At least Pueblo has a "real" river running through it... aka the Arkansas... as opposed to a dead murdered homeless person body dump which is the Fountain, and it has a real lake, aka Pueblo Reservoir.

Cosprings doesn't really get any more snow than Pueblo does and it probably gets less as a county than Pueblo County does once you get south of that Palmer Divide area.
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Old 02-09-2013, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,173 posts, read 20,946,435 times
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If you notice his comment he says "because of the brown grass everywhere.."FYI, they don't call Pueblo "Brown Town" because of the brown grass everywhere" so I do not think its because of the climate.
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Old 02-09-2013, 02:17 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,766,425 times
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Some historical notes here: The early development of both Colorado Springs and Pueblo was the brainchild of the founder of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad, General William Jackson Palmer. Palmer envisioned Colorado Springs as the resort/retreat for the corporate elite/industrial magnates of his era that would be attracted to Colorado Springs' agreeable 4-season "foothill" climate. Palmer himself was part of that elite, in part by his marriage to his wife, "Queen," who was a Mellon of the New York financier Mellon family--and Palmer did live in Colorado Springs (his home, Glenn Eyrie, still stands). Palmer's vision of Pueblo was that of a blue-collar industrial center, what with the town's favorable location of the Arkansas River. To that end, Palmer founded the Colorado Coal & Iron Co. (later to be known as Colorado Fuel & Iron--CF&I) in Pueblo. Colorado Springs, in those early days was known as "Little London," for its aristocratic residents; Pueblo was known as "The Pittsburgh of the West."

Both towns stayed true to their founder's vision for a time, but both later ventured from it. By 1900, Colorado Springs, to the horror of some of its elitist residents, was home to a smelter and a few other "unsavory" industries. The city also ventured from Palmer's vision by the 1940's and 1950's when it embraced both middle-class tourism and the United States military. Palmer and his minions would no doubt have recoiled at "Little London" lowering itself to pander to such "rabble."

On the other hand, Pueblo pretty much remained true to Palmer's vision until the 1970's, when CF&I and many of the related industries that it supported slipped into a decline from which neither the steel mill nor the town has ever fully recovered. Like Colorado Springs, Pueblo did attract some government installations (the Transportation Test Center being the big one), but nothing like the gargantuan military installations that now "grace" Colorado Springs.

One holdover from the earlier era is that Colorado Springs residents (and many other Coloradans) still bash Pueblo's blue collar, gritty character. I find that particularly hypocritical in the case of Colorado Springs residents because Colorado Springs, more than any other place in Colorado--even Pueblo, feeds more voraciously at the government teat and would probably shrink by half if that pork barrel ever stopped feeding the town. Pueblo certainly has its problems--and I certainly would admonish the OP to look at the place very carefully before moving there--but at least it is, unlike Colorado Springs, not hypocritical about what it is.
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Old 02-09-2013, 03:27 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,016,268 times
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Wink As defined by the greater land

Pueblo can look somewhat unpromising from I-25, so, since in the area, take the time to venture farther into town. Otherwise, you may perhaps say to hell with it and drive on directly to Colorado Springs, or to the south, Albuquerque.

As with an interest in Asheville, NC, be sure to visit Manitou Springs. It lies directly west of far larger Colorado Springs, at the edge of and indeed embraced within the edge of the Rocky Mountains. Quite a lovely spot and charming town. The price of real estate may prove the biggest obstacle. That aside, one could easily live there and work somewhere within Colorado Springs. Conversely, one might live within Colorado Springs and spend their free time in Manitou and further west in the mountains. Colorado Springs and environs has a distinctly different feel from Pueblo just in topography, as directly at the base of Cheyenne Mountain and the Rockies, whereas just south of town these mountains pull well back to the west leaving Pueblo stranded high and dry mountain-wise.

Albuquerque has a lot to recommend it, although anyone familiar could easily point out some of the downsides, like crime. But that aspect, as often the case, can be largely avoided in choosing a decent neighborhood. In size it is an actual city, like Denver, whereas any other place in either state at best more a large town. Santa Fe, about an hour north, may be the state capitol but a far smaller place. Also with a distinctly different ambience, so you may well wish in your explorations to also visit not only it but Taos. All can be beautiful places (if viewed maybe at times through rose colored glasses), with Santa Fe and Taos directly at the base of the scenic Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Albuquerque is somewhat removed and will feel it, not to mention lying two thousand feet lower in elevation than either Taos or Santa Fe. Thus it enjoys fairly moderate weather for someplace in the Rocky Mountain West. Expect dry air with the usual large daily swings in highs and lows, if certainly warmer summer nights than experienced higher in the mountains. It can and will snow there, but seldom, and most often just cool to somewhat warm in winter; comfortably warm to hot days in summer. The high (oft snowcapped in winter) Sandia Mountains overlooking the city just to its east serve as an ever lovely landmark.

If with a keen interest in art, then New Mexico may well suite you. With any number, Santa Fe has the most art galleries in the state, if my understanding that Taos has more per capita. There is an intangible feel to northern New Mexico that entices many, and even truth in the saying "Land of Enchantment." That region inspires and draws many artists, having included such notables as Georgia O'Keeffe. Although understand that New Mexico is one of the poorer states in the nation. It is this at times forced simplicity and aura of its stark landscape which can be a struggle, yet inspire and inform one.

March is known as one of the snowiest months in the region, so do not be altogether surprised if encountering a storm or two. Nevertheless also the month of the equinox and formal end of winter, so all tends to melt soon. Save for the highest mountain passes this likely will not prove much of a factor or problem, particularly in this ever so awfully dry winter.

Aside from what might be seen along I-25 from Albuquerque to Fort Collins, CO, the greater experience and understanding would lie in taking some of the backroads to visit the beautiful countryside and mountains of both states. Venture as far afield as Ouray, CO and perhaps in getting there from Albuquerque you'll not only drive through but gain a far better appreciation of what defines either state. Even as most of the populace and employment opportunities exist in the larger metro areas.

Last edited by Idunn; 02-09-2013 at 03:44 PM..
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Old 02-09-2013, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,173 posts, read 20,946,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Some historical notes here: The early development of both Colorado Springs and Pueblo was the brainchild of the founder of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad, General William Jackson Palmer. Palmer envisioned Colorado Springs as the resort/retreat for the corporate elite/industrial magnates of his era that would be attracted to Colorado Springs' agreeable 4-season "foothill" climate. Palmer himself was part of that elite, in part by his marriage to his wife, "Queen," who was a Mellon of the New York financier Mellon family--and Palmer did live in Colorado Springs (his home, Glenn Eyrie, still stands). Palmer's vision of Pueblo was that of a blue-collar industrial center, what with the town's favorable location of the Arkansas River. To that end, Palmer founded the Colorado Coal & Iron Co. (later to be known as Colorado Fuel & Iron--CF&I) in Pueblo. Colorado Springs, in those early days was known as "Little London," for its aristocratic residents; Pueblo was known as "The Pittsburgh of the West."

Both towns stayed true to their founder's vision for a time, but both later ventured from it. By 1900, Colorado Springs, to the horror of some of its elitist residents, was home to a smelter and a few other "unsavory" industries. The city also ventured from Palmer's vision by the 1940's and 1950's when it embraced both middle-class tourism and the United States military. Palmer and his minions would no doubt have recoiled at "Little London" lowering itself to pander to such "rabble."

On the other hand, Pueblo pretty much remained true to Palmer's vision until the 1970's, when CF&I and many of the related industries that it supported slipped into a decline from which neither the steel mill nor the town has ever fully recovered. Like Colorado Springs, Pueblo did attract some government installations (the Transportation Test Center being the big one), but nothing like the gargantuan military installations that now "grace" Colorado Springs.

One holdover from the earlier era is that Colorado Springs residents (and many other Coloradans) still bash Pueblo's blue collar, gritty character. I find that particularly hypocritical in the case of Colorado Springs residents because Colorado Springs, more than any other place in Colorado--even Pueblo, feeds more voraciously at the government teat and would probably shrink by half if that pork barrel ever stopped feeding the town. Pueblo certainly has its problems--and I certainly would admonish the OP to look at the place very carefully before moving there--but at least it is, unlike Colorado Springs, not hypocritical about what it is.
I agree with most of what you said. *GASP* I Know.

Some things I would like to add are:

1) Gougheim, who was the Bill Gates of his day, actually had a mansion in Pueblo and lived here part of the time. He started the smelters and that is where he got some of his money from. He died on the Titanic and was on his way to Pueblo to sign more contracts.

2) The steel mill, known as the Colorado Fuel and Iron company (CF&I), that went bankrupt in the 80's is now Evraz Rocky Mountain Steel Mill. It is the most profitable it has been in its 140 year history, however, due to automation only employs a little over 1,000 people compared to over 10,000 people back in the 1950's and 1960's.

Not to get to much off topic but one of the problems in this recovery is we are entering the robot age. They are taking more and more jobs away from humans and this will be more of a problem as time goes on.

3) The Transportation and Test Center was started as a government agency but its not anymore.

This is their description:

Welcome to Transportation Technology Center, Inc. (TTCI), a wholly owned subsidiary of the Association of American Railroads. TTCI is a world-class transportation research and testing organization, providing emerging technology solutions for the railway industry throughout North America and the world.

Headquartered near Pueblo, Colorado, TTCI manages extensive track facilities, state-of-the-art laboratory facilities, and a highly talented engineering and support staff to make TTCI the obvious choice for meeting your research and testing needs. We encourage you to explore our web site, learn more about us, and contact us to discuss how we can work together.

The link: Transportation Technology Center

They are a world class research facility and while Pueblo is now known as a R&D city this makes us one. One new thing, and I have posted this on the CSU Pueblo thread, is they are developing a Masters in science program where the students at CSU Pueblo will be able to work at the TTCI. This is great and will enhance both the TTCI and CSU Pueblo.
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Old 02-09-2013, 07:25 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,766,425 times
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Actually, the name was "Guggenheim," and the company was American Smelting and Refining Co. (ASARCO). The Guggenheim Museum in New York City is named for his family. It was actually Meyer Guggenheim that founded what became ASARCO. One of his sons, Benjamin, who was not active in the company, was the Guggenheim killed in the Titanic sinking.

As to the Transportation Test Center, it is indeed operated by the Association of American Railroads (AAR), but much of its work is still funded by the US Department of Transportation and/or the Federal Railroad Administration. So, like much of the Department of Defense-supported private industry in Colorado Springs, it is heavily dependent on federal largess for its survival.

You also failed to note that Evraz is a Russian company. It should give people some pause that the largest manufacturer of railroad rail in the United States--by any measure a critical industry to both national economic and military security--is owned by the Russians. But, of course, just about every other critical industry in the US is now owned or controlled by foreign interests, or is hopelessly dependent on foreign manufacturing, financing, or resources. About 237 years ago, a situation like that was called being a "colony."
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Old 02-09-2013, 07:31 PM
 
20,824 posts, read 39,026,176 times
Reputation: 19027
Very interesting stuff......but.....let's get back to helping the OP. Thank you.
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