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Old 02-13-2013, 10:11 AM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,501,104 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
The Ouray-Ridgway newspaper (which I get here in Mass.) advertises "R&R Ranch," said ranch being 27 acres with, among other buildings, a 15,000 sq.ft. "house" built in 2007 "has never been lived in." Full frontal log prow with three stories of windows, just that homey kinda feel we all want. Apparently great views from everywhere. Was listed as originally at over $9 million, now opening bid $2.7 million.
That's a common story all over.
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Old 02-13-2013, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,170 posts, read 20,925,567 times
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Part of the problem that is impacting parts of Colorado is the fact we are entering the robotic generation and robots are taking a lot of jobs away. That is part of the reason the unemployment rate in Pueblo is over 10% even though many of the manufacturing companies located here and doing quite well. One example of this is the steel mill. They are the most profitable they have been in the 140 years they have been around yet they only employ a little over 1,000 people compared to the over 10,000 people during the 50's and 60's. This trend will only continue and I see it impacting every sector of the job market in less then 10 years.
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:34 AM
 
129 posts, read 216,085 times
Reputation: 143
In total agreement Josseppie. Its going to take a major cultural shift to get past this. I honestly have no idea how we can do it when society is completely focused on jobs Jobs JOBS!
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Old 02-14-2013, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
21,865 posts, read 10,195,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
Part of the problem that is impacting parts of Colorado is the fact we are entering the robotic generation and robots are taking a lot of jobs away. That is part of the reason the unemployment rate in Pueblo is over 10% even though many of the manufacturing companies located here and doing quite well. One example of this is the steel mill. They are the most profitable they have been in the 140 years they have been around yet they only employ a little over 1,000 people compared to the over 10,000 people during the 50's and 60's. This trend will only continue and I see it impacting every sector of the job market in less then 10 years.
I doubt they're the most profitable in their history except in current dollars.
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Old 02-14-2013, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,170 posts, read 20,925,567 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
I doubt they're the most profitable in their history except in current dollars.
No they are. One of my cousins works there as a quality control manager and he tells me how they have the contract for BNSF. That one contract keeps them busy all the time. However compared to the 1950's and 1960 the plant is much more automated and requires less people to run it. That is why they only have a little over 1,000 people now and that is why it is so profitable. The downside is it keeps the unemployment rate higher because they need less people. This is just one example and it is occurring in manufacturing all over Pueblo. You add it up and its easy to see why the unemployment rate remains above 10%. I don't know but I suspect its affecting other cities in Colorado as well.
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:17 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,009,577 times
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Wink Roboticization

Interesting mention of robots in the workplace, something which is rapidly being implemented. In looking, I happened upon an article which lists nine occupations affected.[1] The list follows, and eight of those nine would directly affect employment in Colorado.

Pharmacists
Lawyers and paralegals
Drivers
Astronauts
Store clerks
Soldiers
Babysitters
Rescuers
Sportswriters and other reporters

Note that four of these occupations are presently well paying positions, and with the possible exception of babysitters and rescuers all still allow a viable living.

Google is in the forefront of automated vehicles, in league with the department of defense. The 2013 flagship Mercedes S Class sedan will allow for the option of fully automated, hands-free, driving at slower speeds, such as in rush hour traffic. The technology allowing full automation anywhere at any speed already exists; its widespread implementation is five to ten years out, and basically an issue of politics and humans catching up to this reality.

Thus it might be evident that truck drivers, for instance, are an endangered class. It is precisely in such a routine task, especially where the money spent on wages might be saved, that this will likely be rolled out first.

Pharmacists are still counted on for their professional knowledge and thorough schooling, in effect as a second counsel in the decision of one's doctor. Indeed, they should have a fuller understanding of compounding and the interaction of different drugs. As such, this has traditionally been a well paying professional position. But as indicated in this article, that will be changing. First with the interns hired to do the physical pill counting and labeling. But it is conceivable that the inclination will be to automate what should perhaps best remain a personal one on one relationship.

Much will change.

1) 'Nine jobs that humans may lose to robots,' NBC News
Nine jobs that humans may lose to robots - Business - Careers | NBC News
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
21,865 posts, read 10,195,249 times
Reputation: 20026
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
No they are. One of my cousins works there as a quality control manager and he tells me how they have the contract for BNSF. That one contract keeps them busy all the time. However compared to the 1950's and 1960 the plant is much more automated and requires less people to run it. That is why they only have a little over 1,000 people now and that is why it is so profitable. The downside is it keeps the unemployment rate higher because they need less people. This is just one example and it is occurring in manufacturing all over Pueblo. You add it up and its easy to see why the unemployment rate remains above 10%. I don't know but I suspect its affecting other cities in Colorado as well.
Show me the numbers in current dollars and I'll believe it.
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Old 02-15-2013, 09:54 AM
 
20,811 posts, read 38,983,511 times
Reputation: 18999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
Interesting mention of robots in the workplace, ....
Fewer jobs almost certainly means more unemployed or under-employed people, which makes the case all that much stronger for humans to limit themselves to a max of two children, else people the world over will breed masses of people for which there are no jobs. Nothing like a billion hungry mouths with nothing to do running around creating major mischief. As long as there's a major oversupply of labor there will be low wages and grinding poverty; tighten up the labor pool via birth control and wages stand a chance of going up to a reasonable level. I see no reason why supply/demand can't work in the labor-wages dynamic as it does in commodities.
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Old 02-15-2013, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,170 posts, read 20,925,567 times
Reputation: 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Show me the numbers in current dollars and I'll believe it.
I don't have access to those numbers. It was a article I read in the paper last year about how they were going to expand. My point is not just about the steel mill but of all manufacturing companies and even other industries in Colorado as more automation in the work place means less workers which means a higher unemployment rate. This has hit Pueblo hard since we are a manufacturing city but its impacting other sectors in Colorado as well.

60 Minutes ran a story on it and in my opinion is a eye opener on what it means for the economy. Granted this is for a national audience but it defiantly applies to us in Colorado.

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50138922n
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Old 02-15-2013, 10:09 AM
 
5,835 posts, read 10,725,777 times
Reputation: 4421
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado xxxxx View Post
I noticed awhile back that the unemployment rate in Colorado is much higher than neighboring states like WY or NE why is that?

Here's the map and the numbers to back it up Map: LA
Because Colorado in general is more desirable in general? More people want to live here, stay here, whereas a good job is the ONLY reason why one would move or stay in most of Nebraska or Wyoming? (this is excluding of course Omaha area as that is actually civilization and of course the Yellowstone/Tetons, Jackson area as its beautiful and full of recreational opportunities and pristing wilderness, yet still has amenities in Jackson, etc. with people from all over the world to see the beauty). (I've lived in Laramie for two years. I liked the university life, but the rest of the state is lonely)
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