U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-23-2013, 03:26 PM
 
20,836 posts, read 39,046,511 times
Reputation: 19073

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by MR516 View Post
...Where anywhere in my original post did I say anything about living out of a van, delivering pizza, or living off the government? ...
People are quick to go to the worst case stereotype, on this topic and most any other. Must be something about human nature (a fear response?) where we demonize that which is not a mirror image of ourselves or our group, and that demonization is step one down the slippery slope to genocide.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-23-2013, 05:08 PM
 
1,059 posts, read 1,634,577 times
Reputation: 1928
According to Gov Hickenlooper, AG Holder is open to find a way to accommodate the new Colorado marijuana laws.

Colorado Governor: Marijuana Legalization Is "A Challenge For Everybody"

It keeps getting curiouser & curiouser......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2013, 10:47 PM
 
3,103 posts, read 2,833,622 times
Reputation: 4029
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoButCounty View Post
According to Gov Hickenlooper, AG Holder is open to find a way to accommodate the new Colorado marijuana laws.

Colorado Governor: Marijuana Legalization Is "A Challenge For Everybody"

It keeps getting curiouser & curiouser......
Thanks for the link, that is very intriguing. Maybe Holder and his lackey's have been offered a nice redundancy package.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2013, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
3,768 posts, read 4,618,092 times
Reputation: 4885
Quote:
Originally Posted by MR516 View Post
As you said lots of very succesful people smoke pot, most people on this forum probably know/work for some of them, but of course they don't tell them cause they know what the people will think. Richard Branson, Willie Nelson, Carl Sagan, and of course 50-99% or successful actors, writers, musicians.

Where anywhere in my original post did I say anything about living out of a van, delivering pizza, or living off the government? Yes the feds can still prosecute in Colorado, but if I only have the legal amount I'm allowed to have in Colorado, and I am not selling why would they bother me. Where I live now they will throw me in jail for having a piece of a joint.
I apologize, actually I was thinking of a different OP when I posted in this thread.

I understand the rules in other states, truth is Colorado was not that much different only a few years ago. Personally as I have said numerous times I do not smoke (although many people seem to think I do as I am offered it almost daily), and I have long held professional positions in companies, I have seen people smoke that would shock many others who have this vision of the pot head hiding in his mothers basement all day long.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2013, 02:39 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,019,284 times
Reputation: 2622
Wink If you can keep it

'He pauses for a moment before saying: "People like me can't be stopped. It's a war. They lose men, and we lose men. They lose their scruples, and we never had any. In the end, you'll even blow up an aircraft because you believe the Colombian president is on board. I don't know what you have to do. Maybe sell cocaine in pharmacies. I've been in prison for 20 years, but you will never win this war when there is so much money to me made. Never."

"What is happening in Latin America is a revolution," says Ethan Nadelmann, the expert in New York. "Presidents are saying: 'Put an end to the drug war!' That was completely inconceivable for a long time." For a long 25 years, Nadelmann was a revolutionary without a revolution. But now, all of sudden, he is in the thick of things. He met three presidents last year: then-Mexican President Felipe Caldéron, Colombian President Santos and Guatemalan President Pérez Molina. They were all seeking his advice to develop a new, more effective drug policy.'

'Perhaps there will a day when Nov. 6, 2012 will be considered the beginning of the end of the marijuana prohibition. At any rate, what happened on that day has opened up the first holes in the system.'
[1]



An interesting article on various aspects of drug use and prohibitions against it. From this one might gain a fuller understanding of the many forces at play, as well as constituents with vested interests.

There have been international prohibitions against drugs for the last 100 years. The United Nations has had an interest since at least 1961, with its Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. This all ramped up in 1971 with then President Nixon's new "war on drugs." What began as a $100 million initiative funded by the American taxpayer has morphed into $15 billion today.

In 2011 alone, 750,000 people were arrested for marijuana offenses in the United States, most merely for possession. Many over time have ended up in prison as a consequence.

There are many factors involved, not least of them perception. 'It is an intrinsic part of our morality and culture, and there is hardly a greater taboo than to legalize drugs. Nadelmann calls this feeling "the fear of the unknown." [1]

Yet as the recent elections in Colorado and Washington towards the legalization of recreational marijuana use have demonstrated, positions and attitudes are changing. Theoretically at least, due continuing Federal prohibition, but likely in practice, citizens in these two states will by state mandate be able to legally possess roughly 30 grams of marijuana, and purchase it from licensed outlets. As well, in Colorado, legally grow a few marijuana plants at home towards personal use.

Although one should be aware that if the impetus for such change is purely libertarian by some, other parties have other agendas. In many quarters an easing of restrictions is merely perceived as a perhaps better solution towards the eventual decline in all use (save of course that unrelated in all the many prescription drugs, which are pushed upon the populace). Legalization of all currently restricted narcotics would largely end the huge sums of money made in the black market. Yet criminal cartels would continue to exist, as often drugs only make up about half their business, being also involved in such as prostitution, Internet crime, and weapons smuggling.

"Mafia-like cartels would no longer control drugs. Their business model, a gigantic profit margin made possible by prohibition, would be destroyed, and so would their power … And, instead of criminals, licensed providers would be selling the narcotics. In the future, all the billions that were being spent on the drug war -- for soldiers, prisons and criminal prosecution -- would go into health education. This would include drug prevention and addiction treatment, as well as the targeted fight against a black market for drugs that will form despite legalization." [1]

Which raises the specter of abuse in other quarters. State governments stand to make a handsome profit on the sale of marijuana alone. That can provide welcome revenue to over-burdened budgets, allocated to schools and such. It can also lead to temptation. In part perhaps welcome through the example to other states, and thus the wider spread of legal marijuana use. But as humans are often imperfect, also to greater fraud and abuse among politicians and within these states—unless a careful eye kept upon them. Which in part suggests that all taxes and thus revenues gained should be appropriate, similar to alcohol perhaps, and certainly not much higher.

Then also, that this is but the beginning. A small inroad into a dark mindset perpetuated for many decades, as well a vast bureaucracy of many vested interests who would see the continuation of the existing war. One not only having killed some 70,000 in Mexico in the last few years, but also having ruined the lives of many Americans through unwarranted incarceration, etc. Indeed in the huge increase in the American prison population, and the rise of private prisons and their need for a continual (and preferably increasing) supply of new bodies. Also of an American government which has become massively corrupted, depending on a continual "war on drugs" as reason and in part funding towards its now perpetual "war on terrorism," and increasingly not only a traitorous shredding of our Constitution, but an undeclared war on the civil liberties of the American people. Many will not let this go easily.

Or that there is far more at stake than one might realize. And within Colorado the first small steps towards rationality and liberty have been taken.

As noted by Dr. James McHenry, one of the Maryland delegates to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, a lady asked Benjamin Franklin, as he left Independence Hall, "Well, Doctor, what have we got—a Republic or a Monarchy?"

His reply: "A Republic, if you can keep it."

1) 'Our Right to Poison: Lessons from the Failed War on Drugs,' Der Spiegel
Global Support Grows for Legalizing Drugs - SPIEGEL ONLINE
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2013, 07:37 PM
 
25 posts, read 149,313 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwiley View Post
I apologize, actually I was thinking of a different OP when I posted in this thread.

I understand the rules in other states, truth is Colorado was not that much different only a few years ago. Personally as I have said numerous times I do not smoke (although many people seem to think I do as I am offered it almost daily), and I have long held professional positions in companies, I have seen people smoke that would shock many others who have this vision of the pot head hiding in his mothers basement all day long.
Thanks, and apology accepted.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2013, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Western Colorado
11,049 posts, read 12,398,038 times
Reputation: 25945
I have several friends in other states and every single one of them have asked me if I can buy pot at Walmart or the gas station now, and if everyone is walking around smoking it. There's really a misconception out there about this new law. Anyway to the OP, good luck to you in whatever you decide.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2013, 06:42 PM
 
25 posts, read 149,313 times
Reputation: 63
I'm actually finding lots of jobs, but having a hard time getting them to interview/hire someone from out of state. I have never applied for jobs before in a different state so I'm not sure if this is a Colorado thing, or just part of looking for jobs in another state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2013, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Corona
10,058 posts, read 13,945,641 times
Reputation: 8887
I wouldn't rush to CO for work. I have been looking hard for a job in high tech sales, where I am a proven success, and it's not much better than my friends from So Cal, where I grew up, even though there unemployment rate is much higher? I was laid off last June.

Some of my friends have medical MJ cards, they are pretty easy to get.

But don't think you can walk into a liquor store and buy weed don't think so. From what I have seen it's only those with MMJ cards can even go into a dispensary.

The local news said it will take until 2014 for retail pot shops to have a chance. The feds are in takes with state officials.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2013, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,835,798 times
Reputation: 9316
MR516 wrote: I'm actually finding lots of jobs, but having a hard time getting them to interview/hire someone from out of state. I have never applied for jobs before in a different state so I'm not sure if this is a Colorado thing, or just part of looking for jobs in another state.

Based on my own experience, I would say that it's an everywhere thing, more pronounced during tight economic times and less so when the economy is booming.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:21 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top