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Old 02-19-2013, 08:24 PM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,531,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thelionofmali View Post
Waneroo, one of my bigger worries is that awkward resume like you said. I don't really have a rebuttal for that. I am just worried that if I wait until I have a job secured, how long will I be waiting?

Thank you for the car registration info. $150 is a lot, but not $600 like jazz was saying.

This is a difficult decision and quite a process. I appreciate all the insight everyone has given. I am flying out there there first week of April and will try my luck at the job fair. If prospects look awful, maybe I will have to reconsider.

Do you stay somewhere because its easy financially and career wise? Even if you aren't happy/satisfied?

Or do you try to follow your dreams and take that risk, knowing it could be near-career suicide?

Idk, idk. I've never been one to follow my dreams and say screw the consequences. That's a part of the reason I am considering it so much.

Thanks again everyone.
I remember when I was ready to move on from Colorado and into the "dream" career I wanted, I was a bit antsy over it and someone close to me said not to fret about it. At the moment I had a great job, was making good money and when the right opportunities came I could take them. And I did. It took about 4 months from the time I decided to move on to when I found my first job in the business I am in now and then another 6 months before I left Colorado for good. I was ready to go, go, go, but I was patient and found the right opportunities, instead of choosing unemployment and a hope I would immediately land something.

Thing is these days, it's a very competitive job market. Colorado is a top tier state that people aspire to. Hence you have plenty of very qualified people seeking a limited pool of jobs in a declining economy. There are tons of MBA's and PhD's that are working at Applebee's right now in Colorado. A 23 year old with limited experience doesn't go far right now. Do you know the unemployment rate in the USA right now for people below the age of 25 is nearly 50%? If you have a job, I'd keep it until you find something else and I would be happy you have that job. Colorado will fall into place for you when it is supposed to.

I have mucho family and friends in Colorado. There is not a person I know in Colorado that is content with their income or work situation/job or where they want to be financially. That was not the case 10 years ago. Add in the fact it's not the cheapest state to live. It once was for a while in Colorado back in the late 80's to around 2005-2006, where I felt Colorado was a bargain in terms of income you could earn compared to living costs. But I think it has long since ceased being a value for the money state and the job opportunities are not there anymore I feel.

As I said, I went out there with not a lot of money, but also I had wisely lined up a job and a place to live. A bit of planning and taking your time to find a job is not a bad idea. Colorado is not going anywhere and I think "the mountains" are overrated anyways. You can't eat them and they don't feed you and there is only so much you can do with them(they don't like people anyways seeing how many people mountain rescue has to chase after to save). I lived in Vail, CO for over 7 years so I know. It's like a celebrity. You have big expectations for them and then meeting them in person you find they are shorter, fatter, uglier then you see on TV, in other words, just regular people(well Liz Hurley's boobs did meet my expectations but I digress), not the super amazing people you thought they were from the PR and what you saw in the movies. Colorado is much the same way. People get carried away by all the purdy pictures and what they saw as a tourist and miss the warts on it's back and the flabby thighs.
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Old 02-19-2013, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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In post #46 I wrote: BUT....that 10% sleight-of-hand is derived via government math and creative bookkeeping. The government number crunchers all have extensive training in voodoo economics. The real unemployment number probably approaches 20%. The current economic climate is alot closer to the depression era than most people are willing to acknowledge. The duct tape holding it together is better hidden than it was during the depression, and the media's job is to paint a rosy picture and never show us the duct tape.

That being said, I am still a believer in chasing your dream! If your thought process is clear, and you are chasing your dream with eagerness and a genuine belief that good sh*t happens to you all the time, then nothing that I wrote in #46 amounts to a hill of beans. With the right mindset, none of the poor economy bullsh*t matters. You'll always be in the right place at the right time, and doors will magically open for you. It happens all the time! Millions of Americans are THRIVING thru this whole mess. Maybe you'll become one of them.

Last edited by CosmicWizard; 02-19-2013 at 08:47 PM..
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Old 02-19-2013, 08:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thelionofmali View Post
Jazz, I value your insight on Colorado, but I really think you are being over dramatic about the state of the economy. I suppose that you do this for a living and know more than me, but our 10% unemployment does not really compare with the great depressions 25%.
If you actually dig into the depths of the numbers you'll find if you calculate current unemployment the way they did back then, it's about the same. The current U6 rate is around 15%, which is comparable to many periods in the depression.

They made the same mistakes from 2008 to present day as they did in the Great Depression. Increases in taxes and expenses on the individual and business that reduces economic activity and Keynesian government spending that jacks up the debt. Just like in the "Depression", it wasn't all dour, there were times it looked like everything would be fine and then it wasn't.

Also if you think this is normal, when I was your age, the u3 unemployment rate was around 4%. And for much of 1982-2007, the u3 unemployment rate was around 4-6% typically.
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Old 02-19-2013, 08:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
If you actually dig into the depths of the numbers you'll find if you calculate current unemployment the way they did back then, it's about the same. The current U6 rate is around 15%, which is comparable to many periods in the depression.

They made the same mistakes from 2008 to present day as they did in the Great Depression. Increases in taxes and expenses on the individual and business that reduces economic activity and Keynesian government spending that jacks up the debt. Just like in the "Depression", it wasn't all dour, there were times it looked like everything would be fine and then it wasn't.

Also if you think this is normal, when I was your age, the u3 unemployment rate was around 4%. And for much of 1982-2007, the u3 unemployment rate was around 4-6% typically.
Another factor to consider is this: During the Great Depression, it was still possible for one wage-earner to support a family. Few middle-class people can do that now, and the ones that do either have few or no children or live a very austere lifestyle.

I would counsel any young person who has a job to hold tight for at least the next 12-18 months. I think that the economic disaster that we are going to face will be coming into much more clear focus by then. A lot of very smart business people and investors that I know are quietly moving in to "capital preservation" mode in anticipation of a very bloody economic ride--a ride that bodes very ill for an economy like Colorado's that is still way too over-reliant on government employment, recreation, and services. Colorado is going to be like a restaurant with only fillet mignon on the menu trying to attract customers when people can't even afford to buy a hot dog.
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Old 02-19-2013, 09:01 PM
 
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Thanks for the really thoughtful posts idunn, waneroo, and cosmic. I'm glad I decided to come out of the shadows and share my thoughts/wishes/dreams with all of you.

I am also going on another road trip this summer and will be living in Steamboat with a friend for a month in July (he owns a house with spare rooms). I would LOVE to move with a job, and I certainly will apply to as many schools and jobs as possible.

The part that is difficult with teaching is the timing. I really appreciate the opportunity my school has given me and want to give them the proper time and respect if I do leave. BUT I also want to be secure as possible with a job, that I could potentially get during that month. That timing/security aspect of the decision is another part I struggle with.

Do I tell them my intentions and resign early ? (getting a solid letter of recommendation in the process) Or do I go on the road trip and try to find a job in Colorado, sort of behind my schools back (without a letter of recommendation and no contact to my current schoool) and screw them over if I get it? Keeping in mind, the second route would let me go back if I failed for a month and try again.

Advice welcome as always.
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Old 02-19-2013, 09:16 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,950 posts, read 20,207,715 times
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Default Silly question

Quote:
Originally Posted by thelionofmali View Post
another part I struggle with. ...
Do I tell them my intentions and resign early ?... Or do I go on the road trip and try to find a job in Colorado, sort of behind my schools back ...and screw them over if I get it?
You will find in life that your employer will drop you without notice and with almost no severance.
You owe your employer nothing.
Look out for yourself.
Advice from an old fart who is now 64 and worked in high-tech his entire life. Happily self-employed for the last 16 years.
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Old 02-19-2013, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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jazzlover wrote: Colorado is going to be like a restaurant with only fillet mignon on the menu trying to attract customers when people can't even afford to buy a hot dog.

In which state(s) are the affordable hot dogs being sold?
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Old 02-19-2013, 09:34 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,785,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
You will find in life that your employer will drop you without notice and with almost no severance.
You owe your employer nothing.
Look out for yourself.
I have been hiring and firing people for over 30 years, and I disagree. Having a good employment track record is ALWAYS important, and it is even more important if you are relocating someplace where you are not a "known quantity." That becomes even more critical in a state like Colorado where, despite all the growth, there is a very well-established "network" in most career fields where people know of and about one another all across the state. If you come here with anything like a poor recommendation from your home state, depending on where you apply and/or interview, that little piece of information could be spread across the state like wildfire--especially if you are applying in rural school districts. The network is tight and word gets around. Go to a less populated state like Wyoming and that is even more true. A few years ago, a Wyoming Governor described the state as "One big small town with a mighty long Main Street." A few pejorative words about you by some hiring people could "poison the well" for your job chances in the whole state. I've seen it happen. Colorado, especially away from the Front Range metro areas, is much the same.
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Old 02-19-2013, 09:34 PM
 
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Dave: the only thing wrong with that line of thought is that I don't work for a company. I work for my students. I don't really care how it effects the school as a business(?) but I do care how it effects my kids.
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Old 02-19-2013, 09:36 PM
 
24 posts, read 28,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I have been hiring and firing people for over 30 years, and I disagree. Having a good employment track record is ALWAYS important, and it is even more important if you are relocating someplace where you are not a "known quantity." That becomes even more critical in a state like Colorado where, despite all the growth, there is a very well-established "network" in most career fields where people know of and about one another all across the state. If you come here with anything like a poor recommendation from your home state, depending on where you apply and/or interview, that little piece of information could be spread across the state like wildfire--especially if you are applying in rural school districts. The network is tight and word gets around. Go to a less populated state like Wyoming and that is even more true. A few years ago, a Wyoming Governor described the state as "One big small town with a mighty long Main Street." A few pejorative words about you by some hiring people could "poison the well" for your job chances in the whole state. I've seen it happen. Colorado, especially away from the Front Range metro areas, is much the same.

Jazz, I definitely care about my reputation, but (in this scenario) I would only be screwing over the school IF I did get a job. Which then, my reputation with that school wouldn't matter as much I suppose, since I would already be employed.
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