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Unread 04-27-2008, 06:06 PM
 
9 posts, read 17,973 times
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Default Don't move to CO if you have Asthma!

I have Asthma, my husband has Asthma, and my Mother has Asthma. We all seemed to think CO would be OK for us. It'd get us out of the humidity of the East Coast (NY) which is just terrible for Asthmatics, especially the bronchiospasms that the humidity brings on. We came here a little over a month ago and are trying to find a new place to move out of here. It is dusty, windy (bad for allergies), and the altitude is terrible. I have a 20 month old and I can barely do things with him like the park, or a walk. We are all suffering here. I have been to the hospital 3 times already for breathing issues -- where I haven't had to be hospitalized since a child. This place is terrible for Asthmatics, hence why there are so many Asthma clinics like National Jewish here! My husbands grandfather has COPD and lives in Parker -- his life is at risk from the altitude and he and his wife are moving next month. My husbands sister didn't have Asthma but once she came here she has a hard time also breathing. You don't want to be here with any allergies, asthma, or heart issues. It is bad!
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Unread 05-30-2008, 04:06 AM
 
110 posts, read 243,912 times
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Default Common Sense

The fact that some people with asthma do much better in Colorado's high altitudes and dry climate and some do worse suggests that people need to understand the underlying cause of their asthma before they make a decision about moving to Colorado. If your asthma is triggered by mold, then Colorado's dry climate would probably be good. If your asthma is triggered by pollen, then you need to know which pollen and whether that type of pollen exists in Colorado. If your asthma is triggered by dust then you need to figure out whether the part of Colorado you want to move to is dusty. If you are allergic to pollens, it makes sense to me that you would be better off in area that is dry (fewer pollen carriers grow in dry areas) and has a winter (cold kills many pollen producing plants) than you would be in a hot, humid location that produces many pollen carriers. You can always use a humidifier to increase the humidity level--or even use a nebulizer--in a dry area. I'm sure the thin air at high altitudes is not good if you're having an asthma attack, but isn't the object preventing the asthma attack in the first place?
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Unread 05-30-2008, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Everywhere
1,921 posts, read 742,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TaraMoon View Post
The fact that some people with asthma do much better in Colorado's high altitudes and dry climate and some do worse suggests that people need to understand the underlying cause of their asthma before they make a decision about moving to Colorado. If your asthma is triggered by mold, then Colorado's dry climate would probably be good. If your asthma is triggered by pollen, then you need to know which pollen and whether that type of pollen exists in Colorado. If your asthma is triggered by dust then you need to figure out whether the part of Colorado you want to move to is dusty. If you are allergic to pollens, it makes sense to me that you would be better off in area that is dry (fewer pollen carriers grow in dry areas) and has a winter (cold kills many pollen producing plants) than you would be in a hot, humid location that produces many pollen carriers. You can always use a humidifier to increase the humidity level--or even use a nebulizer--in a dry area. I'm sure the thin air at high altitudes is not good if you're having an asthma attack, but isn't the object preventing the asthma attack in the first place?
You are right on the mark with everything you said.
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Unread 05-30-2008, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Everywhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilysorrow View Post
I have Asthma, my husband has Asthma, and my Mother has Asthma. We all seemed to think CO would be OK for us. It'd get us out of the humidity of the East Coast (NY) which is just terrible for Asthmatics, especially the bronchiospasms that the humidity brings on. We came here a little over a month ago and are trying to find a new place to move out of here. It is dusty, windy (bad for allergies), and the altitude is terrible. I have a 20 month old and I can barely do things with him like the park, or a walk. We are all suffering here. I have been to the hospital 3 times already for breathing issues -- where I haven't had to be hospitalized since a child. This place is terrible for Asthmatics, hence why there are so many Asthma clinics like National Jewish here! My husbands grandfather has COPD and lives in Parker -- his life is at risk from the altitude and he and his wife are moving next month. My husbands sister didn't have Asthma but once she came here she has a hard time also breathing. You don't want to be here with any allergies, asthma, or heart issues. It is bad!
I felt 80 percent better than anywhere else in the country when I moved to Colorado, as far as asthma goes. Unfortuately, I hated Colorado cold. I hated the cold, and the irony is that the cold kept my asthma in check.
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Unread 05-30-2008, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Road Warrior
2,016 posts, read 3,323,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TaraMoon View Post
The fact that some people with asthma do much better in Colorado's high altitudes and dry climate and some do worse suggests that people need to understand the underlying cause of their asthma before they make a decision about moving to Colorado. If your asthma is triggered by mold, then Colorado's dry climate would probably be good. If your asthma is triggered by pollen, then you need to know which pollen and whether that type of pollen exists in Colorado. If your asthma is triggered by dust then you need to figure out whether the part of Colorado you want to move to is dusty. If you are allergic to pollens, it makes sense to me that you would be better off in area that is dry (fewer pollen carriers grow in dry areas) and has a winter (cold kills many pollen producing plants) than you would be in a hot, humid location that produces many pollen carriers. You can always use a humidifier to increase the humidity level--or even use a nebulizer--in a dry area. I'm sure the thin air at high altitudes is not good if you're having an asthma attack, but isn't the object preventing the asthma attack in the first place?
RIGHT ON THE MONEY! But also something might help is keeping the indoor humidity level at 35%-45% as you know we use natural AC in colorado but it is essentially very dry here and windy at times and dust tends to kick around, we are also very pet friendly here and so does pet dandur, very bad for allergy sufferers. Cleaning up screens and hardwood floors will help as well.

Are Indoor Humidity Levels Affecting Your Health? (http://ezinearticles.com/?Are-Indoor-Humidity-Levels-Affecting-Your-Health?&id=297092 - broken link)
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Unread 06-02-2008, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Denver
1,084 posts, read 2,640,073 times
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Contributors: dust, grass and pollen allergies (it blows around all year instead of settling down in the rain), dry air can make mold allergies actually worse in the winter if you don't clean, and of course, the altitude puts a stress on the lungs.

Things that might be better: fewer types of plants and density of plants, no leaf mulch to speak of, more wind to blow away some pollutants. Age of housing new or old, good or bad.

Fewer active molds inside homes, which are all controllable with non-carpeted floors and good old fashioned bleach water. you will have better luck inside with double pane windows and tight doors as well.
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Unread 06-16-2008, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Colo. Springs
45 posts, read 192,518 times
Reputation: 28
It's interesting for me to see so many people complaining of sinus headaches & asthma problems due to the dry climate. I am completely the opposite, both my asthma & my sinuses are killing me today because it is so humid here (90% right now according to NOAA).

Normally here I will need to use my inhaler once every 4-8 weeks (allergy & exercise induced asthma). When I was in Montana a few weeks ago I was using my inhaler about 6 times a day & got very sick, it took me 3 weeks to get over that crud!
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Unread 06-16-2008, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Everywhere
1,921 posts, read 742,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JASMINE13 View Post
It's interesting for me to see so many people complaining of sinus headaches & asthma problems due to the dry climate. I am completely the opposite, both my asthma & my sinuses are killing me today because it is so humid here (90% right now according to NOAA).

Normally here I will need to use my inhaler once every 4-8 weeks (allergy & exercise induced asthma). When I was in Montana a few weeks ago I was using my inhaler about 6 times a day & got very sick, it took me 3 weeks to get over that crud!
in my short time in Colorado, my asthma was just about cured. In fact I never upacked my inhaler. I did gets sinus headaches however, really bad. We later found out we had a gas leak from our fireplace, so that might have had something to do with it.
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Unread 06-21-2008, 01:06 PM
Status: "Snow on the blooming daffodil!" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
65,031 posts, read 51,314,622 times
Reputation: 17735
I work in a dr's office and we prescribe a lot of inhalers. I'd unpack mine if i were you; you'll probably need it sometime. I never did office nursing anywhere else, so I don't have a handle on whether there is more or less ashtma here. I do know the oxygen level in your blood goes down at altitude, and that can't be good for someone with reactive airways. One reason National Jewish and other respiratory specialists are here is that it used to be thought that the cool dry air would cure tuberculosis. Lutheran Medical Center used to be a TB sanitarium. So did Mapleton Hospital in Boulder (now a branch of Boulder Community Hospital). In point of fact, people did get better here (sometimes) because they were removed from the overcrowded conditions where they were living, also the rest they received. TB is caused by a bacteria, but it is spread more easily in overcrowded housing.
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Unread 06-22-2008, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Everywhere
1,921 posts, read 742,997 times
Reputation: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I work in a dr's office and we prescribe a lot of inhalers. I'd unpack mine if i were you; you'll probably need it sometime. I never did office nursing anywhere else, so I don't have a handle on whether there is more or less ashtma here. I do know the oxygen level in your blood goes down at altitude, and that can't be good for someone with reactive airways. One reason National Jewish and other respiratory specialists are here is that it used to be thought that the cool dry air would cure tuberculosis. Lutheran Medical Center used to be a TB sanitarium. So did Mapleton Hospital in Boulder (now a branch of Boulder Community Hospital). In point of fact, people did get better here (sometimes) because they were removed from the overcrowded conditions where they were living, also the rest they received. TB is caused by a bacteria, but it is spread more easily in overcrowded housing.
you probably live in Denver where there is a lot of air polution, I lived in Loveland, next to Ft Collins, cleanest air around. It also has to do witht he fact that some asthma is allergie born, and some is mold. Not much grows in Colorado, and you cant find much mold. The Altitude has Nothing to do with asthma.
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