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Old 03-08-2013, 02:31 AM
 
6 posts, read 40,830 times
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Hello, first post here, everyone seems very helpful

My fiancee and I are planning to move away from Seattle to another area of the US. We have been looking for months and have decided Colorado to be one of the possible places. We own our own online business and only need a good internet and mail post to send products out. Our combined income is anywhere from 5000 - 7000 a month depending on the month. We are however wanting to possibly buy a house in the next couple of years and want to save as much as possible.

Reasons why we are leaving Seattle:

It never stops raining... like ever. If it does not rain it is cloudy.
Prices are extremely high here and we are paying over $1300 for a ****ty 2 bedroom apartment.
That's about it really.

What we are looking for:

Good weather. For us that means; summers around 70-90 degrees would be awesome, snowy winters are fine, but less rain and clouds would be nice.

We don't need to commute anywhere and we like our peace. We like suburbs and outskirts.

We are willing to spend a little more for a nice house to rent and do not want to live in an apartment complex.

We are outdoor people. If we can spend 80% of the day outside we would. Our work does not take much time so we are free for most of the day to explore.

We are 24, very into yoga, health, and festivals, so an area that may have like minded people.


What do you all think? Any advise on an area in Colorado or even another state would be very much appreciated.

Thanks!!!!!
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Old 03-08-2013, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Evergreen
397 posts, read 588,461 times
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If you're looking at Colorado and from what you are describing, Evergreen or Conifer would be a possible location. These towns are located 30-45 minutes west of metro Denver. There are plenty of like-minded people into yoga, health, and a great outdoor lifestyle. It's a great platform to explore the mountain/ski towns from as well as the city.
Summer weather temperature is exactly as you described. Most homes don't have air conditioning because you don't need it. I moved from hot, humid NY and have missed having air conditioning on maybe 5 days in 4.5 years. Great sleeping weather with the windows open at night.
There are a number of festivals throughout the summer at Evergreen Lake. A summer concert series every other week, chili cook-off, and skate the lake are some that come to mind. A farmers market every Tuesday for about 4 months in the summer. There's also a ton of open space parks and hiking trails. Good Luck with your search. I've been to Seattle and I agree that the rain would get really old, really fast!
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Old 03-08-2013, 08:07 AM
 
2,514 posts, read 3,486,397 times
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I think your limiting factor will be budget. At $60K per year income the housing here is going to look a bit expensive. A nice area I recommend for people on a budget is Thornton. By renting there you can explore the area and give the weather a test drive. Unfortunately you will be moving from one extreme to the other. I've known people who move here looking for more sun. What they don't anticipate is that the sun here is intense, extreme and often oppressive. Those coming from a more middle ground area seem to tolerate it better. Those from the Seattle area, that I've known, after a year or two run back into the hazy mist and are happy to do so. I'm not trying to discourage you as you sound like an excellent fit for pretty much the entire metro area. However it does pay to explore the idea that when you say you want more sun you may not want as much as we have. Sun here means broad brim hats, long sleeve shirts in 100 degree weather, sunglasses, near constant sun block, washed out weak colors, no greenery, dry, dusty, brown landscape, rocky hikes and lots of bare dirt.
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Old 03-08-2013, 08:15 AM
 
129 posts, read 216,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allensig3654 View Post
Prices are extremely high here and we are paying over $1300 for a ****ty 2 bedroom apartment.
You won't find things any cheaper here for housing.

I think, working from home, you should look anywhere BUT the Front Range.

The big question is, do you like access to people?
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Old 03-08-2013, 01:16 PM
 
6 posts, read 40,830 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mic111 View Post
I think your limiting factor will be budget. At $60K per year income the housing here is going to look a bit expensive. A nice area I recommend for people on a budget is Thornton. By renting there you can explore the area and give the weather a test drive. Unfortunately you will be moving from one extreme to the other. I've known people who move here looking for more sun. What they don't anticipate is that the sun here is intense, extreme and often oppressive. Those coming from a more middle ground area seem to tolerate it better. Those from the Seattle area, that I've known, after a year or two run back into the hazy mist and are happy to do so. I'm not trying to discourage you as you sound like an excellent fit for pretty much the entire metro area. However it does pay to explore the idea that when you say you want more sun you may not want as much as we have. Sun here means broad brim hats, long sleeve shirts in 100 degree weather, sunglasses, near constant sun block, washed out weak colors, no greenery, dry, dusty, brown landscape, rocky hikes and lots of bare dirt.
Our yearly income averages out to be - 70k - 90k but we do indeed want to save. I am seeing houses on craigslist for ~ $1500 - $1700 a month which is very in our price range.

Also, is the weather like this all throughout Colorado? Are the areas near the mountains possibly a little cooler weather. We really do love the sun


Quote:
Originally Posted by lovethehighcountry View Post
You won't find things any cheaper here for housing.

I think, working from home, you should look anywhere BUT the Front Range.

The big question is, do you like access to people?

Access to people is not really important to us at all. We usually keep to ourselves anyway.



I would take any advice on other areas in the US you think might be better if not for Colorado. We are looking for cheap states as well as one of our main concerns is to save some money to buy a house and currently have ~30k saved up for one now.
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Old 03-08-2013, 05:01 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,019,284 times
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Wink In priority

You might consider New Mexico. It will generally prove less expensive than Colorado (assuming a non-local income). Colorado does not provide the lowest cost of living, if that is your primary concern. Albeit less expensive than the coasts, and certainly Seattle.

In Colorado, that you've mentioned probably places you somewhere on the Front Range. With weather for one, as mountain locations will usually not see temperatures of 70º - 90º, they are cooler than on the Western Slope or plains, with more cloud cover. Also not really qualifying in the suburb category. Most communities in the mountains are small towns. A place like Evergreen is somewhat a suburb, but well separated from Denver and the greater metro area, and as well in feel or density not the same as any Denver suburban community.

With your income you could live anywhere in Colorado, if most inexpensively along the Front Range (save out in the middle of nowhere on the plains or in the mountains). You'll have plenty of sun, if also the summer thunderstorms the Pacific Northwest is unaccustomed to. You'll get more for your money, but expect to pay about the same in rent—only in receiving something you'll enjoy more.

Yoga, health and festivals all can be found in communities like Boulder. Due its greater expense, you'll have to spend longer saving for a down payment. But otherwise it might be worth it. Maybe Durango as well, in the far southwest corner of the state. In priorities, you've some decisions to make.
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:16 PM
 
6 posts, read 40,830 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
You might consider New Mexico. It will generally prove less expensive than Colorado (assuming a non-local income). Colorado does not provide the lowest cost of living, if that is your primary concern. Albeit less expensive than the coasts, and certainly Seattle.

In Colorado, that you've mentioned probably places you somewhere on the Front Range. With weather for one, as mountain locations will usually not see temperatures of 70º - 90º, they are cooler than on the Western Slope or plains, with more cloud cover. Also not really qualifying in the suburb category. Most communities in the mountains are small towns. A place like Evergreen is somewhat a suburb, but well separated from Denver and the greater metro area, and as well in feel or density not the same as any Denver suburban community.

With your income you could live anywhere in Colorado, if most inexpensively along the Front Range (save out in the middle of nowhere on the plains or in the mountains). You'll have plenty of sun, if also the summer thunderstorms the Pacific Northwest is unaccustomed to. You'll get more for your money, but expect to pay about the same in rent—only in receiving something you'll enjoy more.

Yoga, health and festivals all can be found in communities like Boulder. Due its greater expense, you'll have to spend longer saving for a down payment. But otherwise it might be worth it. Maybe Durango as well, in the far southwest corner of the state. In priorities, you've some decisions to make.
I will look into New Mexico, thanks
As far as suburbs go, I actually prefer a nice small town/village. I have heard a lot of good about Boulder and will look into it. I love thunderstorms so that is a bonus for me.
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Old 03-08-2013, 08:30 PM
 
825 posts, read 1,604,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allensig3654 View Post
I will look into New Mexico, thanks
As far as suburbs go, I actually prefer a nice small town/village. I have heard a lot of good about Boulder and will look into it. I love thunderstorms so that is a bonus for me.
Boulder does sound like a possible fit. Consider also Ft. Collins, Longmont, Woodland Park, Monument/Palmer Lake, and at the other end of the state - Durango. If you really like the mountains you might consider Idaho Springs or even (and I suggest this with great hesitation) Leadville. I realize that this advise is a bit unfocused, but at this point your search is a bit unfocused as well.

I also am going to disagree somewhat with the premise that New Mexico is less expensive. It may be, or it may not be. Most of the areas with the climate you seem to want will be as expensive as anywhere in Colorado - Aspen/Vail/etc. excepted. On the other hand, Taos is probably no more expensive than Boulder, and they are culturally different enough that you are bound to prefer one over the other.
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Old 03-08-2013, 08:39 PM
 
51 posts, read 126,434 times
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Most of Denver's newer suburbs are lifeless and sterile. It's like people are playing sim city with real homes. However, those tract homes are extremely cheap.

Boulder is super nice but it's a college town. If you're not 18-25 you'll probably be annoyed with the constant partying. It's not what you would call a quiet place. If you're older it will probably be difficult meeting people your own age as well. Boulder is very transient; people move on after they graduate because there aren't a ton of jobs there.

Denver/Boulder is super hot in the summer btw. It's like you don't want to go outside in the middle of the day; unless your in the mountains of course.

The winters are really nice. Very mild, with occasional snow. The skiing is unreal.

Evergreen is a good option. Some of the older suburbs in Denver aren't bad. Downtown is a cool place.

If I were you I would avoid all resort towns. The people up there are really dysfunctional for the most part. Expensive as hell too and you have to deal with rude tourists constantly. A lot of substance abuse going on up there. Also, it is so transient. You'll make friends and they'll be gone at the end of the winter/summer. In regard to locals, you'll be the only person with any kind of money and people will constantly be trying to mooch off you.

Keep in mind that Colorado is changing a lot these days. In the last 10 years its become more liberal, developed, and crowded. There are a lot of East Coast and CA people escaping the insanity on the coasts only to bring their crap to CO. In my opinion, Colorado was the place to be yesterday; it's becoming more and more like CA.

Last edited by Ratherbefishing; 03-08-2013 at 08:58 PM..
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Old 03-08-2013, 09:25 PM
 
529 posts, read 1,249,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allensig3654 View Post
I will look into New Mexico, thanks
As far as suburbs go, I actually prefer a nice small town/village. I have heard a lot of good about Boulder and will look into it. I love thunderstorms so that is a bonus for me.
Boulder is very expensive! Apartments and homes in Boulder are somewhat higher than Denver. Boulder is also full of college people who think they own the world! Boulder is in a beautiful location however.

I would reccomend visiting the front range area (Ft. Collins to Pueblo), as well as towns on the western slope such as Montrose, and Grand Junction.

As far as rain, you won't get much in Colorado (good and bad). The sunny climate of Denver and the front range is very nice as well. Denver, etc. get's about 3,200 hours of sunshine a year this equalls around 285 days!

Cities such as Colorado Springs have much cheaper home prices than Denver and Boulder, and Colorado Springs is in a beautiful location at the foot of Pikes Peak. It is a very conservative town though, just like Boulder is very Liberal.

Montrose is a very nice little up and coming small city with everything you need to be happy. It's just under an hour or so from the beautiful San Juan Mountains (Ouray, Telluride, Beautiful waterfalls, etc.)! Weather on the western slope however is less mild than the front range.

As mentioned check out New Mexico, Utah, and Arizona (if you don't mind the 120 degree Summers) as well!
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