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Old 04-01-2013, 03:38 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,697 posts, read 4,333,575 times
Reputation: 10278

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Quote:
Originally Posted by delta07 View Post
I love the look of indoor landscaping, and when added to the right establishment, I do believe it can really enhance it. However, I'm thinking that one of the main reasons you don't see this in the ski resort areas of Colorado is because they are just that. To me, walking into a ski resort town should feel like such. I think warm, cozy lodges and big fireplaces. I don't think tropical plants. They would seem out of place. Now, if you could somehow create the lodge feeling with your indoor landscaping, then I think you might have a niche market. I'm thinking evergreen trees and plants. Ones you would find in the natural landscapes outside, buried in the snow. It might be more of a challenge, but it might be what you need to think about.
You bring up some good points, but bear in mind that Colorado resorts are open year 'round - not just during the ski season. Plus, it's really not all that hard to come up with plants that appear they belong here even though they'd be dead in about ten seconds if left on a Colorado mountainside somewhere.
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Desperately seeking work in the Four Corners!-xmaslooking.jpg  
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Old 04-01-2013, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Bend, OR
3,296 posts, read 8,423,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
You bring up some good points, but bear in mind that Colorado resorts are open year 'round - not just during the ski season. Plus, it's really not all that hard to come up with plants that appear they belong here even though they'd be dead in about ten seconds if left on a Colorado mountainside somewhere.
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Oh yes, I know that they are open year round. I was just thinking that any tropical vegetation would seem out of place in Colorado ski resort, no matter the season. It does seem like you've thought this through though, and have come up with some creative ideas. Hopefully you can make a go of it. Best of luck!
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:29 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,697 posts, read 4,333,575 times
Reputation: 10278
More depressing news from my part of Colorado. The local paper, The Cortez Journal, is cutting back publication from 3 times a week to only twice. The publisher, Ballentine, will be laying off a number of workers.

Meanwhile the local Housing Authority has reduced the "fair market value" it will allow for those who must depend on Section 8 rental vouchers in Dolores, Montezuma, and La Plata Counties. Fair Market in La Plata (including Durango) is now $749.00/month for a single person/one bedroom unit. This sum includes utilities. So anyone who wishes to move to Durango where there are jobs, must find a rental for around $650.00/month, assuming they can sqeak by paying only $100/month for gas and electricity combined. You might be able to get a storage unit in Durango for that amount, but that's about it. And the rules will not allow someone with a voucher to share a rental with another person not a family member in order to save on housing costs. How foolish is that?

Fair Market in Cortez is now $500/month which means keeping your utilities bill to under $70/month, so you can rent a place for the extravagant sum of $430/month or so. I've heard that the cuts are due to the sequester, but don't know if that's true or not.

What I do know is that these policies make it extremely difficult to leave a distressed county to move to one with a better economy and chance for employment. If I could find a job that paid me even $1,000/month, I wouldn't need a voucher and I'd gladly get off the program I'm sure that there are others in the same position as me - wanting a job, not a handout, but stuck in a place where there has yet to be a recovery from the recession and jobs practically non-existent.

I'm trying really hard to maintain a positive outlook, but some days I can't help but feel pretty discouraged.
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Old 04-04-2013, 06:57 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,783,192 times
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What a lot of relatively affluent retirees on the forum can't get their arms around is that the Colorado scenery, as pretty as it is, means little for many folks whose attempts to make a living here crash into the reality of a fundamentally unbalanced rural/resort economy away from the metro areas that makes it extremely difficult for people who financially need to work to be able to do so.

My advice to people in that situation--and I'm giving it as one who has done it both ways, staying in the area to weather an economic storm or getting out to make a decent living elsewhere--is this: Unless you are very close to retirement age and have an adequate living income independent of the local economy, and/or have very compelling family reasons to stay in rural Colorado, get out and move to an area that has some semblance of a functioning economy with decent jobs, livable typical incomes, and reasonable living costs for working age people. Bluntly, most of rural Colorado now has none of those, and--given what the future likely holds for most of rural Colorado--probably won't have in the foreseeable future.
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Old 04-04-2013, 09:40 PM
 
16,507 posts, read 20,906,955 times
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Jazzlover is right, particularly in this corner of the state. I'm familiar with what's happening there, which is very little. I've stayed the night in Cortez several times, know one of the business owners by Wendy's (Rocky Mountain One Stop) who sells used cd's, guitars, picks, etc., etc. On the surface, downtown looks somewhat busy but I've talked to a few store owners and things are very slow. A few store owners are in ok shape only because they own their buildings and have for years. if they paid rent for retail space they'd be gone. I haven't been south on 491 out to Shiprock in a while, a couple years ago I noticed the truck stop was empty. Empty! Sad. If memory serves ya got a Port Of Entry there. Didn't see it.

How this sequestration business shakes out with Cortez's primary tourism destination (Mesa Verde National Park) is on the minds of those store owners, you bet it is. The hotel chains seem to be ok the last time I went through. Generally where i stay is Budget Host which is across the street from the Holiday Inn. The mom and pop motels on 491 south are not busy though IMO. The small towns north of Cortez like Cahone, Pleasant View, and Lewis-nothing happening there. The only mystery is Dove Creek. The Lunch Box restaurant was packed the last time I was in there. Good breakfasts might be a part of the reasons though! Maybe someone hit the lotto and they're celebrating at the Lonesome Dove Bar (yes there was such a place there some time back.)

CR, I wish I could come up with an answer for ya, I wish I could!

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 04-05-2013 at 07:39 AM..
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Old 04-08-2013, 12:23 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,697 posts, read 4,333,575 times
Reputation: 10278
Many thanks, Jazzlover and DOUBLE H ! I am all too aware that the Cortez region is a dead end unless you bring money here that you made elsewhere or have some specialized skill there just so happens to be a need for. However, I am staying on here for a while longer until I get a better understanding of my possible options. Only time will tell, and I see no point in taking a premature action which will be the equivalent of jumping out of the skillet and into the fire. One of my friends has decided to quit his job in Cortez in order to try his fortune in Parachute. I've told him that he's crazy to quit a secure job here to go move to a place where he has neither another job or housing lined up, but his impulsive departure may be my golden opportunity. I am well qualified to fill the job he's quitting, and I think I would get serious consideration if I applied. I also am waiting to hear if I will be accepted to a federal program that I've applied to. Don't know what the budget cuts will do to its funding, but there's the potential that I could get some real assistance to obtain work if they accept me.

Meanwhile, I'm just observing the difficulties that the people of this part of rural Colorado are going through. I hope better days are ahead for us all, but it's hard to feel optimistic at the moment. I'll update this thread from time to time, since SOMEBODY should let the rest of the world know what's going on in this remote and hard pressed corner of Colorado.
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Old 04-10-2013, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Corona
10,063 posts, read 13,951,849 times
Reputation: 8887
Cortez! Everyone I know in Pagosa and Durango if they are lucky work three jobs to survive. Teachers working as waitresses at night. The whole area has a high unemployment rate and those that are employed, most are underemployed. And as mentioned this isn't going to change.
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Old 04-10-2013, 07:54 PM
 
Location: mancos
7,170 posts, read 6,447,346 times
Reputation: 4943
Hey CR check out the town 15 miles east hireing a librarian on craigs list.only 20 hrs a week with benies. 15 minute drive for you. hope it's still open heard it from a neighbor.
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Old 04-10-2013, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,838,766 times
Reputation: 9316
Colorado Rambler wrote: I hope better days are ahead for us all, but it's hard to feel optimistic at the moment.

That is the unfortunate reality of the moment. The challenge is to simply acknowledge it, without dwelling on it, which is guaranteed to bring more of the same. NOW is the time to use your imagination advantageously and IMAGINE a better future.

“Reality leaves a lot to the imagination.” ~ John Lennon

“Imagination is everything. It is the preview of life's coming attractions.” ~ Albert Einstein

“Imagination is intelligence with an erection.” ~ Victor Hugo
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