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Old 07-22-2013, 11:31 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westcliffe View Post
The Four Corners area has turned into an overtaxed ozone trap. Cortez, Mancos, Durango, Bayfield - it's over. IF you believe in the climate change bull$__t then believe that the cool nights in this little hamlet are probably over as well. Who knows? Mancos looked good at one point, however upon further study the spells of warm summer nights and slacking air quality are not attractive at all.
Whatever.

The air quality is about the same as always out here. Someone should go blow up the Four Corners Power Plant, but they've actually been putting out less particulates in recent years after they were forced to clean up their act (kind of). It still certainly beats the Front Range.

The low tonight is forecast to be 57. Currently, it's 71 with a light breeze. I'm having a late night barbeque on my back porch. Olathe corn and steak. Yum! It's a very pleasant evening in Cortez., and my small garden is growing like gangbusters. Picked my first ripe tomato yesterday.

Tomorrow's high is supposed to be 91 while GJ is supposed to hit 100 and Denver 99. We're living the good life in Cortez this week.

 
Old 07-24-2013, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Western Colorado
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The latest water vapor imagery clearly shows moisture streaming into our area from the south. While this occurs today, a shortwave will pivot around the area of high pressure that has remained over our area. As the moisture and energy meets, widespread rainshowers and thunderstorms are expected to form from about noon onwards. Models indicating that the San Juans and Central Mountains are favored for the heaviest precipitation but in this regime, any slower moving cells could produce heavy rainfall. More convection is expected again tomorrow but with the moisture plume shifting eastward somewhat, activity should be a bit less.

Nice steady rain in Ridgway this morning, cool breeze. Really nice outside.
 
Old 07-24-2013, 05:21 PM
 
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^For much of the area, this forecast is looking like another bust. This summer's forecasts by the NWS have been some of the collectively most inaccurate that I have ever seen. In many areas, it has shown days upon days of high probability for heavy rain, little of which has materialized. I'm still hoping for some good rain in the next few days to hit southern Colorado and northern New Mexico, but what there has been lately has been very spotty, and frequently not where predicted. Oddly, some normally very dry areas are the ones that have gotten hammered, while the normally favored areas for good rain go without. Very weird.
 
Old 07-24-2013, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
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We had some nice rain and even some hail in and around Pueblo today. Plus it has been humid for us.
 
Old 07-26-2013, 08:36 PM
 
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Default Finally . . .

After a couple of weeks of "toying around," the Southwest Monsoon finally put down some decent rain in far southern Colorado and far northern New Mexico yesterday and last night. I happened to be in that region to see it. Still, though, the pattern was not normal for the Southwest Monsoon. First, what occurred was a phenomenon not seen often outside of the Great Plains. It's called "training"--where one thunderstorm moving in a direction destabilizes the atmosphere enough in its wake that a succession of thunderstorms form and follow the same path. That happened yesterday and made for some significant cumulative rainfall. Also unusual, these storms followed a similar pattern seen over the last few weeks, the storms forming in the mountains and then sliding south--vastly expanding and gathering strength, thence pounding normally dry, lower elevation areas with heavy rain and flash flooding. Thus, the mountain areas got some decent rainfall, but it was lower areas down toward Albuquerque that got absolutely pounded, a couple of places getting nearly half of their normal annual rainfall out of one night's storms.

Sadly, it appears that the weather pattern in the region is heading back to a dry one next week.
 
Old 07-26-2013, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Western Colorado
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Wet weekend forecast for western slope:


7-26-13: A wet weekend ahead! - YouTube
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:04 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
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^^^

I wish it had done that in MY part of far Southern Colorado. We got zilch. Today was extremely hot. I thought my clunky little room air conditioner was finally giving out, but I think it just couldn't handle the very high temps we had here. No rain is forecast in the region for the next 5 days.

The Cortez paper had a story on the pika's heading up to even higher elevations than where they're normally found (usually 10,000 feet or so). Apparently, they start dying when exposed to temps of 80 F or more. Pretty soon they're all going to be crowded together on the tops of Colorado's fourteeners if the warming trend continues. I don't know where they'll go from there unless they start migrating north into Canada. I'm considering moving to Rico, myself.
 
Old 07-27-2013, 08:43 AM
 
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^The Albuquerque National Weather Service office made note in their Forecast Discussion this morning (Sat.) that the Four Corners region has pretty much missed out on all of the precipitation this past 10 days or so, but that today might be the day that changes. We can hope. Unfortunately, after tomorrow, the forecast is for the whole area to go back into a dry pattern for at least the better part of a week. So, if the next two days don't bring precipitation, we could be back in increasing fire danger by next weekend.

To put all of this in perspective, hot and drier than normal summers and winters are nothing new to the southern Colorado/northern New Mexico region. Some of those periods, even in the last century, have lasted for years. Tree ring data shows similar periods that have lasted for a decade or more in centuries before the "Europeans" showed up in the Southwest. What has changed is that the human population of the Southwest is now far above what can be sustained if long-term severe drought (say, a decade of it) occurs. That reality was addressed clear back in the 1970's in the book Cadillac Desert, but nobody wanted (or wants) to listen. Point is--it ain't only gonna be the pikas that are forced to migrate. I suspect that they have their s**t together a whole lot better than we humans do in that regard.
 
Old 07-27-2013, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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jazzlover wrote: it ain't only gonna be the pikas that are forced to migrate

When all the people of Colorado migrate elsewhere, we will be a category with the hated Texans, and Californians.
 
Old 07-27-2013, 01:45 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,743 posts, read 4,374,478 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post

No rain is forecast in the region for the next 5 days.


Quote:
jim9251]Wet weekend forecast for western slope:


7-26-13: A wet weekend ahead! - YouTube
Heh! For once I have only myself to blame for an inaccurate Cortez forecast. I was pretty tired when I made my post here last night. I was thinking of the PAST 5 days, not the COMING 5 days. Whoops!

Even at that, the Accuweather forecast for here is "a couple of afternoon thunderstorms around" - not exactly a resounding endorsement. But it IS much cooler - a welcome relief. Sunday is supposed to be cool, as well. Then back to higher temps and 10% chance for precip next week.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover
^The Albuquerque National Weather Service office made note in their Forecast Discussion this morning (Sat.) that the Four Corners region has pretty much missed out on all of the precipitation this past 10 days or so, but that today might be the day that changes. We can hope. Unfortunately, after tomorrow, the forecast is for the whole area to go back into a dry pattern for at least the better part of a week. So, if the next two days don't bring precipitation, we could be back in increasing fire danger by next weekend.

To put all of this in perspective, hot and drier than normal summers and winters are nothing new to the southern Colorado/northern New Mexico region. Some of those periods, even in the last century, have lasted for years. Tree ring data shows similar periods that have lasted for a decade or more in centuries before the "Europeans" showed up in the Southwest. What has changed is that the human population of the Southwest is now far above what can be sustained if long-term severe drought (say, a decade of it) occurs. That reality was addressed clear back in the 1970's in the book Cadillac Desert, but nobody wanted (or wants) to listen. Point is--it ain't only gonna be the pikas that are forced to migrate. I suspect that they have their s**t together a whole lot better than we humans do in that regard.
I remember reading Cadillac Desert when it came out. I was a student at the University of Colorado at the time and the prof's in my biology and climatology classes were talking back then about water supplies in the arid mountain West and increasing population pressures.

I also read Powell's Report on the Lands of the Arid Regions of the United States and Wallace Stegnar's Beyond the 100th Meridian, among others. Powell realized back in the 1880's that the arid West was not suitable for agricultural development, except for about 2% of the lands that were near water sources. He was an advocate of conservation and low density. No one paid any attention to him, either.

@CosmicWizard: I can see it now - roving bands of Coloradans with their pikas carefully stashed under one arm in an Igloo cooler box, taking to the roads in search of a new home. Kind of like the Grapes of Wrath only in reverse.
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