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Old 08-30-2013, 12:13 PM
 
1,059 posts, read 1,636,221 times
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Been living here at 6,500' for two months now. I still sometimes find myself gasping for air but since I continue to hike & climb, my stamina continues to improve. I've heard that it can take as long as 6 months for your body to acclimate.

No worries, all part of the natural process.
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Old 08-30-2013, 12:34 PM
 
Location: OKLAHOMA
1,783 posts, read 3,607,325 times
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We spend a few days at the 6500 (Santa Fe, Trinidad or Taos) and then go to Chama area at 8000 feet all the time. I feel healtier there than here at 0 feet. I get a lot of headaches here in Eastern OK but the minute I up there, no headaches. My husband seems fine too although once he had a nosebleed that lasted a few days . Didn't know Durango was only 6500. Usually I'll head on up to Pagosa but drive back down to Chama where we love.
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, FL
146 posts, read 226,154 times
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Thank you ALL responders!

But does everybody adjust even if it takes over 6 months?

I am worried about making a huge mistake. I might not be able to make another move. And I don't know how to be sure unless I say give it a go, and see what happens after half a year.

The notion of being even more limited and more fatigued is not something I take lightly for sure.
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Pluto's Home Town
9,995 posts, read 11,648,693 times
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I tend to adjust fairly quickly.

Though I was chuckling at how dumb I was when in Boulder recently. You know, standing with an arm pushing on a door that says PULL in large letters,etc. Alas, it was for a job interview.

I was brilliant, I tell you, as soon as I got back home....
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Old 08-30-2013, 02:16 PM
CTC
 
Location: Pagosa Springs, CO/North Port,FL
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I moved from the SF Bay Area to Leadville( lived there for 4 years in 2004), sea level to 10120 feet. It took me a couple of months to adjust, and after that sometimes the altitude would just hit you- like running up stairs etc. The cool thing is when you go down to sea level you feel like a super hero. Man I was in good shape when I lived in Leadville-I could summit Mt Sherman in 45 minutes!

Interestinglyenough your body compensates for lower oxygen levels by making more red blood cells-I had my blood taken for a job health screening, the phebodomist said it was like taking paste.
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Old 08-30-2013, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, FL
146 posts, read 226,154 times
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Cool that my thread got merged.

This was a happy happy link
Altitude Fast Facts


About the extra red blood cells, looks like it would be best to be on a McDougall or Ornish diet to start. Lowest in fat, less sloggy blood. As a theory what do you think? Might help me? I didn't do that when I visited ABQ.
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Old 08-30-2013, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,712 posts, read 3,040,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CABQ View Post
Thank you ALL responders!

But does everybody adjust even if it takes over 6 months?
No, unfortunately, not everyone adjusts. There are lots of people that just can't handle the altitude. They get headaches, migraines, and other symptoms. But those are very few and far between.
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Old 08-30-2013, 11:24 PM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,539,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CABQ View Post
Thank you ALL responders!

But does everybody adjust even if it takes over 6 months?

I am worried about making a huge mistake. I might not be able to make another move. And I don't know how to be sure unless I say give it a go, and see what happens after half a year.

The notion of being even more limited and more fatigued is not something I take lightly for sure.
If you already have health or fitness problems, Colorado and high elevation may make them worse. There is no guarantee. In addition as you age, it becomes more difficult. All of my high elevation relatives that lived above 7500 ft, by the time they got into their 70's it was time to come to a lower elevation.

For starters, if you have never been then you need to visit first. A lot of people visit for a week or two and realize it's not for them.

Second if you have done that, rent for 6 months or a year and see how it goes.

Living in Vail, I witnessed quite a few people that had to immediately be sent down to Denver and some ended up in the hospital thanks to problems with the elevation.

If anyone tells you everybody adjusts, then I say they are lying, especially if they are real estate agents.
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Old 08-30-2013, 11:43 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,506 posts, read 5,473,474 times
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Most people just *POP* once they get there, it's a well kept secret!

That's why so many people seem to move to Colorado and never leave...it's not the climate or scenery or anything like that...
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Old 08-31-2013, 04:19 AM
 
Location: high plains
493 posts, read 702,415 times
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just returned to sea level 100deg heat/60%humidity after driving up from the south, passing through 7000 ft and spending a week at 5000-7000. felt invigorated all the way upslope and gradually worse all the way downslope. my copd is bad at sea level, better with thinner/dryer air. that visit told me all i needed to know to make a permanent move for my health (not to mention cultural peace of mind). thank you, colorado!
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