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Old 09-26-2013, 01:30 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 19,087,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjcolorado View Post
My husband does/did research on altitude acclimitization and found that most people do the majority of acclimitization within the first two weeks of their arrival at "moderate altitude" which is where most Front Range cities reside. However, the remainder of the adjustment can take anywhere from 7-13 months. The most significant factor in determining how long that process took was if the person had been born at or previously lived at altitude. There is an 'altitude acclimitization' gene which may be turned on in some people and off in others, putting it plainly. Here is an abstract to one of the studies that addresses acclimatization: An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie

However, as others have noted, if you have underlying health issues (asthma, chronic pneumonia, COPD, etc.) you may have continued difficulty with living at altitude, no matter the status of your genes. Best wishes with your move!
Thanks, 'gasp', everyone tells me I should be fine soon. Now, where's my diamox...
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:10 PM
 
811 posts, read 1,224,017 times
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Having moved to COLO from a coastal city in the mid-90's, what caused me to hyperventilate was not the thin air but the realization I could eventually afford a house/family if I worked hard and kept out of trouble. Seventeen years later I never cease to be amazed by that simple fact. Not sure, but I'm pretty sure I adjusted to the altitude in a week or three.
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Old 09-29-2013, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,111 posts, read 4,883,135 times
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I was at the Broncos-Eagles game today and I saw several examples of Eagles fans who made the trip out here fall victim to the altitude.

Those who had to walk up the stadium stairs to their seats got winded quite easily, and those who needed to drown their sorrows ended up drinking too much because no one told them they couldn't drink as much here as they do down there. (If I lived in Philly, I would drink a lot too)
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Old 09-29-2013, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,506 posts, read 5,469,540 times
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I used to ID outside of a few clubs in Denver. When someone showed a low altitude state ID I would warn them about the reduced alcohol tolerance...the ones who resisted and claimed they were able to handle their alcohol were usually getting carried out in relatively short time. ...It makes a BIG difference.
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Old 09-30-2013, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
3,768 posts, read 4,620,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
I was at the Broncos-Eagles game today and I saw several examples of Eagles fans who made the trip out here fall victim to the altitude.

Those who had to walk up the stadium stairs to their seats got winded quite easily, and those who needed to drown their sorrows ended up drinking too much because no one told them they couldn't drink as much here as they do down there. (If I lived in Philly, I would drink a lot too)
Funny I heard the head coach of the Eagles insisted on flying in normally the day before the game due to altitude problems being overrated, wonder if he still feels the same way.

Altitude affects people in different ways, and they all adjust differently. If your problems do not begin to get better within a couple of weeks then you will likely never adjust, I have had former coworkers that could never adjust, I have also worked with people who had no problem at all when moving from coastal areas. The best idea is for someone to visit the area for a week and see what happens to your body, and if you feel better towards the end of the week then you do when you first get here.

Also for a previous poster, I doubt that changing 1000 feet in altitude will have much of an affect on your health, it might be slightly worse, but it is nothing like changing 5000 feet.
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:04 AM
 
Location: OKLAHOMA
1,783 posts, read 3,604,607 times
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I just got back from a 2 week vacation in Chama, NM (8200) with no problem. We even hiked at the pass which is 10000 feet with no problem. I do take it easy for a day or two in hiking around the cabin and on occassion have had a slight bloody nose but no headaches is what I get here at 800 feet. I am lucky with feeling better at higher alitudes and my husband is fine at both high and low.

I guess it affects people differently but this is what I do. Drink tons of water and no spirits for a few days.
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Old 10-03-2013, 11:43 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
302 posts, read 773,351 times
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Depending....it can be an adjustment.

We moved to Colorado from California and my daughter fainted from dehydration the first year. The Dr. said it would take the body about a year to adjust it's hemoglobin (O2 carrying capacity) from there to here.
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Old 10-04-2013, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,838,766 times
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Screw Sacramento wrote: We moved to Colorado from California and my daughter fainted from dehydration the first year

Fortunately, dehydration can be easily avoided by consciously drinking water at frequent intervals throughout the day. This habit can be easily cultivated.
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Old 10-04-2013, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
302 posts, read 773,351 times
Reputation: 156
No ****, really?

Yes, we are now aware of that. Unfortunately, pushing water on people even if they are not thirsty is not always intuitive. My daughter does need to keep up with her water (and her salt) intake. The point is--moving from a more humid place to a more dry place (Colorado) comes with a few inherent risks such as waiting for your blood Hemoglobin to adjust. I wouldn't recommend any brand new Colorado citizen undertake a hike up Pikes Peak right way, know what I mean?
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Old 10-05-2013, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Monument,CO
352 posts, read 289,156 times
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My experience is purely anecdotal, but we moved out to CO from Northern VA 1.5 years ago, and no one in my family felt the difference. I'm 6'3, 168 lbs and in pretty good shape for someone in his late 40s. I didn't take it easy here, and I didn't feel any effects of living at altitude. I don't drink any more water, I've never felt dizzy, etc. It's dry here in winter, and I had a bloody nose for 4 months last year, but that's it. My wife and 6 year old daughter have been the same. My conclusion is that it's all hype. We didn't prepare for the move, do anything to adjust, or take any time to acclimate. If average middle aged people and a youngster are fine, then you will be too.
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