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Old 07-27-2013, 11:58 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,022,369 times
Reputation: 2622

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'Stan Vanderwerf, executive director of UAS Colorado, knows that the word "drone" carries sinister connotations. But, drone-like technology has been used in Colorado for years, he said. Eight colleges or universities in the state use the technology for real-time weather data.

"There are great capabilities in Colorado," Vanderwerf said on Friday. Those include possibly fighting wildland fires, but the technology already is being applied to search and rescue efforts, monitoring livestock as well as environmental studies.'
[1]




There is no doubt that drones can prove a useful tool in many situations. Yet the question remains in what proper application.

This article was initially a reference in the 2013 Colorado Fire Season thread, by another. And as aptly illustrated within, drones could prove a useful tool in the prevention and fighting of wildfires. Granted.

They would also, as also mentioned, have other useful applications as well. BUT also those that will in no way benefit mankind or what remains of democracy in this nation. And lest it need to mentioned, in many nefarious ways in the hands of such as the NSA, who have shown themselves to have no regard for the privacy of anyone, civil norms, or the constitution of this nation. So the question remaining of what their best applications are—AND within what measure of limits.

One consideration in this could be in no more than cumulative exposure. Most anyone will have experienced mosquitoes. Where one or two can be a minor nuisance, swarms of them can cause one to reconsider or cancel their plans. To at times move from an area and quickly, or flee inside. If then imagined as such aircraft—and drones are quickly being miniaturized—then no less as insects.

In what measure would one welcome them, no matter their uses?

Aircraft of all types even now impose a daily burden on civilization. If obviously useful, they nevertheless inflict noise over a broad swath of this country, with few places immune. Near airports there can be major contention between the interests of aviation and nearby homeowners. But if not as severe, this noise still pollutes areas otherwise wilderness.

Rocky Mountain National Park is one such place. One would think that at least here an American could visit and remain in harmony with nature. But only until the next highflying jet or low level private plane passes overhead. In this American jewel and natural sanctuary supposedly "untrammeled" by mankind, even here there is no respite, and this overflight allowed.*

That is the measure of what one is up against. If as well possibly few humans even aware of what true silence is. Although they may soon become quite conversant with that—soon, and ruefully so. The advent of drones could insure it. By design, they will be virtually everywhere.

This would be a fine time, and no less than too late, to consider this question closely and decide. What at last should be the proper place and uses of drones—and that, even if technically possible, that should never be?

* See Gordon Hempton and his "one square inch" initiative in Olympic National Park.
1) 'Drones: The next firefighting tool,' The Gazette
Drones: The next firefighting tool
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Old 07-28-2013, 10:07 AM
 
157 posts, read 177,637 times
Reputation: 351
That's great, but my question and wonder are: what kind of gun do you need to shoot it down?
I understand most of those drones fly at around 5000 feet from the ground. So again, what kind of gun?
I know only one available to civilians that could do that, it's a .50 caliber bolt action rifle. And still, you'll have to know what to do.
Forget your shotgun or 30-06, that won't fly high enough.
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Old 07-28-2013, 06:33 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,697 posts, read 4,336,053 times
Reputation: 10278
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
'Stan Vanderwerf, executive director of UAS Colorado, knows that the word "drone" carries sinister connotations. But, drone-like technology has been used in Colorado for years, he said. Eight colleges or universities in the state use the technology for real-time weather data.

"There are great capabilities in Colorado," Vanderwerf said on Friday. Those include possibly fighting wildland fires, but the technology already is being applied to search and rescue efforts, monitoring livestock as well as environmental studies.'
[1]




There is no doubt that drones can prove a useful tool in many situations. Yet the question remains in what proper application.

This article was initially a reference in the 2013 Colorado Fire Season thread, by another. And as aptly illustrated within, drones could prove a useful tool in the prevention and fighting of wildfires. Granted.

They would also, as also mentioned, have other useful applications as well. BUT also those that will in no way benefit mankind or what remains of democracy in this nation. And lest it need to mentioned, in many nefarious ways in the hands of such as the NSA, who have shown themselves to have no regard for the privacy of anyone, civil norms, or the constitution of this nation. So the question remaining of what their best applications are—AND within what measure of limits.

One consideration in this could be in no more than cumulative exposure. Most anyone will have experienced mosquitoes. Where one or two can be a minor nuisance, swarms of them can cause one to reconsider or cancel their plans. To at times move from an area and quickly, or flee inside. If then imagined as such aircraft—and drones are quickly being miniaturized—then no less as insects.

In what measure would one welcome them, no matter their uses?

Aircraft of all types even now impose a daily burden on civilization. If obviously useful, they nevertheless inflict noise over a broad swath of this country, with few places immune. Near airports there can be major contention between the interests of aviation and nearby homeowners. But if not as severe, this noise still pollutes areas otherwise wilderness.

Rocky Mountain National Park is one such place. One would think that at least here an American could visit and remain in harmony with nature. But only until the next highflying jet or low level private plane passes overhead. In this American jewel and natural sanctuary supposedly "untrammeled" by mankind, even here there is no respite, and this overflight allowed.*

That is the measure of what one is up against. If as well possibly few humans even aware of what true silence is. Although they may soon become quite conversant with that—soon, and ruefully so. The advent of drones could insure it. By design, they will be virtually everywhere.

This would be a fine time, and no less than too late, to consider this question closely and decide. What at last should be the proper place and uses of drones—and that, even if technically possible, that should never be?

* See Gordon Hempton and his "one square inch" initiative in Olympic National Park.
1) 'Drones: The next firefighting tool,' The Gazette
Drones: The next firefighting tool
As long as the Patriot Act remains in effect and the United States continues to engage in the nebulous "War on Terror," the US Government can conduct surveillance on anyone it please and do whatever it feels like to anybody it wants. The potential for the use of drones against citizens is but a symptom of the greater malady in the body politic of the United States today.

Once upon a time, countries used to declare war against other countries not concepts like terrorism. Any individual from a little old lady in San Miguel county with a 12 guage to a couple of fanatics in Boston with a pressure cooker to a nutcase wearing "exploding" underwear on a plane can be a terrorist. Any group can potentially carry out terrorist acts, just as any country from tiny Switzerland to communist China with its exploding population can potentially decide to carry out a terrorist attack. A war on "terrorism" amounts to a war on the entire world, domestic "terrorists" included. The Patriot Act allows the US to ignore inconvenient laws from the Bill of Rights to the Geneva Convention.

A while back I had pulled off the road near a natural gas well in an area that was dotted all over with them. I hardly paid the gas well any attention except that its location near the main road afforded me a safe place to pull over and study my road map. When I looked up from my map, I saw to my surprise that two members of the Colorado State Highway Patrol had pulled their vehicle up behind mine and gotten out and were approaching my car. They asked me all sorts of questions about why I had stopped there, what was my destination, etc. After viewing my papers and calling in to make sure I had no outstanding warrents, they let me go with the admonition, "That you never can tell these days," and warned me to stay away from gas pipelines and pumping stations in the future.

Excuse me? They should just shut down that entire stretch of PUBLIC highway that I'd been driving on, there was so much drilling activity in the region. And they were worried about a middle aged lady squinting thru her reading glasses at a state highway map? Who needs drones?
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Old 07-29-2013, 02:02 AM
 
1,163 posts, read 1,198,892 times
Reputation: 929
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phorlan View Post
That's great, but my question and wonder are: what kind of gun do you need to shoot it down?
I understand most of those drones fly at around 5000 feet from the ground. So again, what kind of gun?
I know only one available to civilians that could do that, it's a .50 caliber bolt action rifle. And still, you'll have to know what to do.
Forget your shotgun or 30-06, that won't fly high enough.
5000 ft won't put you out of 30-06 range!
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Old 07-29-2013, 03:23 PM
 
8,947 posts, read 8,050,066 times
Reputation: 19434
We have had manned small aircraft doing for decades now, the things that drones are taking their place to do. Remember, a drone has to have someone manning the controls it does not fly itself. A drone is a manned aircraft in that sense.

The similarity between using a drone, and a manned aircraft is that they are both flown by a pilot. Both can do the same surveillance, and both can gather the same data.

The big difference, is it is cheaper to build a drone as no accommodations need made for a pilot on board and they can bed smaller.

It is safer, as a piloted aircraft always has a certain amount of danger to the pilot.

People are always afraid of new things, they do not understand.
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Old 07-29-2013, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,111 posts, read 4,885,030 times
Reputation: 5429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phorlan View Post
That's great, but my question and wonder are: what kind of gun do you need to shoot it down?
I understand most of those drones fly at around 5000 feet from the ground. So again, what kind of gun?
I know only one available to civilians that could do that, it's a .50 caliber bolt action rifle. And still, you'll have to know what to do.
Forget your shotgun or 30-06, that won't fly high enough.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seeker5in1 View Post
5000 ft won't put you out of 30-06 range!
I know guns shoot long distances, but when firing straight up or nearly straight up in the air won't gravity play a huge part?

The bullet's velocity is somewhere around 900 m/s, but it is being pulled back to the earth at an acceleration of 9.8 m/s2. Just how far into the air can a .30-06 fly?

Also remember that what goes up must come down. Shooting into the air is a recipe for disaster.
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Old 08-06-2013, 06:18 AM
 
157 posts, read 177,637 times
Reputation: 351
Yes it will, vertically. Remember we're talking about 5000 feet vertical against gravity. Not getting a deer at 5000 feet down the valley.
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Old 08-14-2013, 12:15 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,022,369 times
Reputation: 2622
Wink RoboBees

"INSPIRED by the biology of a bee and the insect’s hive behavior ... we aim to push advances in miniature robotics and the design of compact high-energy power sources; spur innovations in ultra-low-power computing and electronic “smart” sensors; and refine coordination algorithms to manage multiple, independent machines." [1]


As I previously mentioned the miniaturization of surveillance aircraft to the size of insects, will expand on that briefly here.

Among others, Harvard University is diligently working towards the implementation of what they term RoboBees. Among the uses they foresee for such "agile robotic insects" would be:

• autonomously pollinating a field of crops;
• search and rescue (e.g., in the aftermath of a natural disaster);
• hazardous environment exploration;
• military surveillance;
• high resolution weather and climate mapping; and
• traffic monitoring.


Personally, the only bees I want in my garden are nature's own. Naturalists will as well inform that anyone wishing to help correct the current plight of bees should consider making their home more bee-friendly. That would include the planting of flowers they like, or also trees such as hazel and alder whose catkins provide a vital source of pollen in the spring, when the protein needed.

As for RoboBees and other robotic insects, in whole they represent one of mankind's worst nightmares to come. For all their useful applications, it should escape no one that such things are not only ideal for nefarious surveillance but also military applications. Imagine the current move of so-called African killer bees north (due our changing climate), and then expand on that by having their aggressive swarming behavior directly controlled by the CIA with similar robotic insects. The algorithm controlling that can be used with flying robots of various sizes to take out any individual, vehicles as large as aircraft carriers, or entire nation states.

Simply put, mankind's expertise in technology has exceeded our collective wisdom. And how best to live with our fellow man—as well in harmony within this marvelous world with all other species.

1) 'RoboBees,' Harvard University
https://robobees.seas.harvard.edu
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Old 08-14-2013, 09:23 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,697 posts, read 4,336,053 times
Reputation: 10278
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
"INSPIRED by the biology of a bee and the insect’s hive behavior ... we aim to push advances in miniature robotics and the design of compact high-energy power sources; spur innovations in ultra-low-power computing and electronic “smart” sensors; and refine coordination algorithms to manage multiple, independent machines." [1]


As I previously mentioned the miniaturization of surveillance aircraft to the size of insects, will expand on that briefly here.

Among others, Harvard University is diligently working towards the implementation of what they term RoboBees. Among the uses they foresee for such "agile robotic insects" would be:

• autonomously pollinating a field of crops;
• search and rescue (e.g., in the aftermath of a natural disaster);
• hazardous environment exploration;
• military surveillance;
• high resolution weather and climate mapping; and
• traffic monitoring.


Personally, the only bees I want in my garden are nature's own. Naturalists will as well inform that anyone wishing to help correct the current plight of bees should consider making their home more bee-friendly. That would include the planting of flowers they like, or also trees such as hazel and alder whose catkins provide a vital source of pollen in the spring, when the protein needed.

As for RoboBees and other robotic insects, in whole they represent one of mankind's worst nightmares to come. For all their useful applications, it should escape no one that such things are not only ideal for nefarious surveillance but also military applications. Imagine the current move of so-called African killer bees north (due our changing climate), and then expand on that by having their aggressive swarming behavior directly controlled by the CIA with similar robotic insects. The algorithm controlling that can be used with flying robots of various sizes to take out any individual, vehicles as large as aircraft carriers, or entire nation states.

Simply put, mankind's expertise in technology has exceeded our collective wisdom. And how best to live with our fellow man—as well in harmony within this marvelous world with all other species.

1) 'RoboBees,' Harvard University
https://robobees.seas.harvard.edu
Great post, Idunn! We are losing our most fundamental freedoms in the name of the "war on terror." The truth is that the US government is slying becoming the actual terror. The Patriot Act, the NSA, hidden cameras at every intersection and around every corner - even in a small rural town like Cortez.

Bah!

You are right - we should be putting our resources into saving the REAL bees along with the rest of our environment. What good will an electronic bee do when we lose all our croplands and forests to climate warming and drought in the West, torrential rains in places like Kentucky where entire mountainsides slump into ravines and valleys?

This is what happens when Halliburten is granted the rights of a citizen. Soon there will be no democracy left to defend.

*gets off soap box*

I'd better go make some more humming bird food for tomorrow. The little guys have been at my feeder and my flowers in droves, getting ready for lift off. They'll be gone before we know it.

At least I THINK they're hummingbirds. Hmmm...
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Old 08-18-2013, 02:12 PM
 
20,847 posts, read 39,070,515 times
Reputation: 19085
Default Fly Your Own Drone for ~$300

Get your very own drone for $300 and up; there's even a Drone User Group in the DC area....uses are endless.... like the guy who delivered wedding rings to the altar via a drone flown by his brother at the back of the group.... I've even seen some railroad fan videos that were shot by drone.
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