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Old 07-28-2013, 11:16 AM
 
14 posts, read 18,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwiley View Post
I think people either missed what having an autistic child means to a family or are ignoring the fact that you have an autistic son. That can be a problem moving to Colorado, depending on the severity.

Some things you need to know, the waivers for autistic kids and disabled children have wait lists of 5-7 years. Many insurance companies do not cover the therapies in Colorado, meaning you should be ready to pay for any therapies you want for your child out of your pocket for at least the 1st 7 years. Remember California is usually ranked in the top 5 for treatments and funding available for special needs kids, while Colorado is more middle of the pack and I have seen them ranked in the bottom 5 in some studies. The services you have available now, may not even be available anywhere in the state of Colorado.

Visit the schools, all of them will say they have programs for autistic children, but not all programs are created the same. they will say they will provide all the programs in your IEP as they are forced to by the federal government, but considering your son's age his IEP is probably not done as of yet, and they get a say in writing it.

Also find parents of autistic kids in the area, ask them how they feel about the schools and their experiences. My wife and I had both good and bad experiences in a couple of the school districts before moving to Fort Collins, where we found a great autism only program, at the time it was 1 of only 3 in the state, that has dramatically improved where there are more schools offering the programs but it is far from every school district that offers those programs, in fact I would put it as less than half of the schools along the front range.

Avoid the small towns like Conifer, even though the town itself is great, they just do not have the resources in the school district that your child will need, which means he will usually not get the resources he needs or will have to be bussed to another area, and can spend well over an hour on the bus each way. To get him bussed to another school district, expect a huge fight, as there was a case in Loveland CO a few years ago that ended up going to court for a long drawn out battle.

Remember the road to hell is paved with good intentions, many people will provide advice and tell you they have heard good things but really have no idea what is going on in their schools or area for special needs children, find people that actually know through their own experiences and speak to them. You will find out the good and the bad, and there is good and bad in every situation.

If you would like specific information on the schools we tried I would be happy to provide it, the most important thing I learned though is that you have to be careful and research heavily for the right school districts, as your child's future depends on it.
Thank you for your post.

Any place we move we have to consider our Son and his education and treatment. California may be known for Autistic services, but where we currently live, it's all about dollars and it seems that the school district is more concerned with the bottom line over my son. I finally got him enrolled after months and months of jumping through hoops, and then they denied him for the summer education program, I am completely fed up with this area and don't think very highly of their program. The teacher doesn't even talk to me to give me an assessment of how he's doing, improvements etc. . .I come to pick him up and she acts like she's too busy to even give me the time of day, it's very frusturating.

With that said, we're not moving to Co because of their Autism program, we're moving to CO because it's where we've decided to spend the rest of our lives, and with that decision, we will look for the place most appropriate for our needs, with our son as a main consideration.

I've read a little on the Fort Collins program and it's definitely a option that will be looked at hard. Is there a school in particular that is considered better than the rest, and is there a zone I must live in to qualify for enrollment?

On another note, is most of Fort Collins planned community housing tracks, or are there areas with more of a "country feel"? I haven't spent a ton of time researching Fort Collins, but saw that it's commonly on the cnn money's best places list, and most of the houses for sale look to be newer track homes. I don't have a problem with track homes, but they may not have some of the features I am looking for. . .preferably, more of the nature feel, is what we desire.
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Old 07-28-2013, 11:21 AM
 
14 posts, read 18,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwiley View Post
I am actually a loan officer and small business tax accountant, and can at least give you an idea, the down payment will help, also you may qualify for a loan easily depending on how you tax returns look the last couple of years.

You get to average your income for the last 2 years using your tax returns, and some lenders also let you use a year to date P & L. So it really depends on how your taxes look the last 2 years. On top of that you will have to prove that your location is not a large part of that income, meaning if you have an internet based company where you do either mail order or online consulting then you will not have a problem. However if you are a wholesaler providing goods and/ or services to companies in your current area, than you may have a problem. Loans have gotten much tougher then they were in the past, but if you have cash reserves, a large down payment, and an ongoing business showing a nice profit that is improving every year then you should not have many problems.
My taxes the last two years only showed minimal profit from my online business. The majority of income was from my day job which I no longer am employed with. This year I will take a bigger hit obviously since my income situation has changed substantially.

The business is not dependent at all on location, as I sell entirely online.

Would I be more likely to find a lender through a developer with the amount of money I am able to put down?
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Old 07-28-2013, 11:22 AM
 
14 posts, read 18,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alliern View Post
I sent you back a DM with mortgage lender options.
got it, thank you. Apparantely I can not respond to your DM as I'm only allowed one per 24 hours.
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Old 07-28-2013, 12:23 PM
 
14 posts, read 18,101 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danyy View Post
i would like to now how u get all that money for big house working only at home,ehheheh. One thing for sure don't come in Ocean City MD not even for summer that s my advise

A lot of hard work for sure, 16 hour days, and no life for the past few years while building the home business while working full time. Getting connections, overseas manufacturers, importers etc. . .it was a slow process but once I started seeing the potential my obsessiveness took over and it was all I could think about. It's been a sacrifice for sure, our 1900 sq ft home filled with boxes and inventory, my garage stacked high to the ceiling with boxes, my bedroom a disaster. . .you get the idea.
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Old 07-28-2013, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,111 posts, read 4,882,341 times
Reputation: 5429
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwiley View Post
Avoid the small towns like Conifer, even though the town itself is great, they just do not have the resources in the school district that your child will need, which means he will usually not get the resources he needs or will have to be bussed to another area, and can spend well over an hour on the bus each way. To get him bussed to another school district, expect a huge fight, as there was a case in Loveland CO a few years ago that ended up going to court for a long drawn out battle.

Remember the road to hell is paved with good intentions, many people will provide advice and tell you they have heard good things but really have no idea what is going on in their schools or area for special needs children, find people that actually know through their own experiences and speak to them. You will find out the good and the bad, and there is good and bad in every situation.

If you would like specific information on the schools we tried I would be happy to provide it, the most important thing I learned though is that you have to be careful and research heavily for the right school districts, as your child's future depends on it.
I will respond only to this part of your post.

School districts are different everywhere you go across the state. In JWiley's case, counties in the northern part of the state are broken into several school districts which may or may not have programs. Thus, the fight in Loveland.

Evergreen and Conifer are in Jefferson County Schools. It is the largest school district in the state (by population) and encompasses the entire county. Because of this, if a student were to need to attend a neighboring school for a program, it is much easier to do so as all the schools are in the same district.

As for autism programs in Jefferson County, I found this article (about 3 years old). I do not know if the program still exists, but in all likelihood it does. Here is link to the Special Education Services page for Jeffco schools.

Mortensen Elementary is 1 block west of Kipling Parkway and Chatfield Avenue in South Jefferson County. It is adjacent to the Ken Caryl area which is a master-planned community built in the early 1980s. This area is adjacent to the foothills, and offers easy access to C-470.

The feeder area into Mortensen is has more modest homes (most homes and condos are in the $200k - $275k price range), but there is a new subdivision being built that has upper end homes. Here is a real estate search for Mortensen's feeder area. The area south of Chatfield and east of Garrison has the nicest homes. Here is home for sale that might fit your needs.

It is possible to choice into a school if you live outside the attendance boundaries, but you are not guaranteed a spot in the school, so living within the attendance boundaries is the best bet.
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Old 07-31-2013, 09:08 AM
 
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I would recommend Ft. Collins if you want good pricing and a wide array of good folks. CSU is a very respectable university, so easy access when your kids grow up, but still a small town feel. The downtown area is very cool. It has a true downtown strip that has restaurants, cute shops and interesting fare. It is much more than your typical college town. I don't live there, but have many friends who do and they love it. It has been rated one of the best cities for families in the U.S.

Colorado Springs is very conservative. All of these people recommending Colorado Springs should put an asterisk by it. If you are a conservative Christian, Focus on the Family is there. You would love it. If you are a moderate or liberal, it is more difficult to find the right neighborhood to feel comfortable. Those will be the people teaching your child, and influencing the community. Again....if it is your cup of tea, it is perfect. Littleton and south is rather white bred and conservative. I know....I lived in Littleton. Remember, that is where Columbine is and they are still trying to deal with student issues. I like a more diverse population and you don't get that in Littleton or Highlands Ranch. If you are white and want people who look just like you, either of these three areas would feel comfortable.

Denver is a great city, but expensive. You couldn't afford much more than a 1400 sq. ft. bungalow unless you get in more of the outskirts. Aravada, Wheat Ridge, Broomfield, Westminster and Lakewood are all commutable to Denver, but with that not being a factor, they are all nice towns if you just want to be in a suburb of the city. Those towns give your child access to a lot of programs and opportunities. All have good schools. The further from the city center the better the home deals. Broomfield, Westminster and parts of Arvada are closest to Boulder of these suburbs. You couldn't touch Boulder with a 10 ft. pole in terms of price, but it is a widely liberal town with lots happening at the University of Colorado. Lafayette and Louisville are bedroom communities of Boulder and part of Boulder county, which have great schools. You could find a nice home there if you wanted more of a country feel with Boulder nearby. Boulder has the most amazing downtown of any city in Colorado.

Durango is beautiful. It is a bit remote and south in the state, but it is a true cowboy kind of area. On the flip side you can also see amazing opera. It is a fun place. It is one of my favorite places to vacation in the state. It has a great old cowboy town feel and it is intentional. You can take a narrow gauge train to very remote parts of the state. I know nothing of the schools, but I think there is a good solid community of folks who are quite close knit. One of my friends worked for CDOT there and totally loved their life. It is a "live and let live" kind of place.

There are many beautiful areas of Colorado. We have succumbed to fracking. Oil fracking is a drain on water and can cause seepage into water systems. Some have also been contaminated with natural gas and their water is ignitable. Not to make you afraid, but be sure that you know those boundaries before you buy. I would read articles about "fracking in Colorado," to see where it is problematic. Locals won't buy your home if you live in one of those areas should you decide to resell.

I have attempted to give you a fair, but honest review. I hope it helps.
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Old 07-31-2013, 09:19 AM
 
4 posts, read 4,243 times
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(more info) By the way, Ken Caryl is one of those "white bred" areas I talked about. Evergreen and Conifer are beautiful and the snow is bountiful. Most of the mountain communities are cool, but can be dicey in the winter. Rocky Mountain Autism Center is in Lone Tree, which is south. However, you could live in Englewood which would be close to Denver and give you easy access to the Center. The Joshua School is in Englewood, and I have heard good things about them.
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Old 07-31-2013, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,837,299 times
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MartiJ7 wrote: Denver is a great city, but expensive.

Just saw a news blurb yesterday that real estate prices in Denver are at an all time high.
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Old 07-31-2013, 04:17 PM
 
14 posts, read 18,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MartiJ7 View Post
(more info) By the way, Ken Caryl is one of those "white bred" areas I talked about. Evergreen and Conifer are beautiful and the snow is bountiful. Most of the mountain communities are cool, but can be dicey in the winter. Rocky Mountain Autism Center is in Lone Tree, which is south. However, you could live in Englewood which would be close to Denver and give you easy access to the Center. The Joshua School is in Englewood, and I have heard good things about them.

Thanks for taking the time to write that.

I've been looking into Conifer/Evergreen, as those locations have the feel and the types of home we desire. I'm pretty desperate to get out of the city, cookie cutter housing tracks etc. . .nothing wrong with it, I'm not trying to offend anyone, it's just not what I am looking for after spending my entire life in crowded So Cal.

I'm currently in process of checking out the programs and if it would work for my Son, but I really appreciate all of your help in giving us a little guidance and a few locations to look at.

God bless you all, and I look forward to living amoungst any of you if I happen to end up in one of your communities.
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Old 07-31-2013, 06:50 PM
 
2,514 posts, read 3,487,165 times
Reputation: 5069
Some thoughts:

Check the internet speed available for any property your looking at. Here is a company that might be able to help you.
EvCo Services
"
The answer is "it depends on where you are". In some locations 1.28 Mbps is the highest download speed available. In other areas faster download speeds are available through the Qwest Network. Lower speeds may be available to fit just about any budget.

Other factors that influence speed
As a general rule, the DSLAM's are located right next to Qwest telephone cabinets. DSL speeds will degrade if the length of the phone wire exceeds 3.4 miles, but most homes and businesses are within those limits.

DSL travels within your telephone line*. Sometimes telephone lines are overhead and are laid out in relatively straight lines, and sometimes the telephone lines are buried and only appear on the surface of the ground in those green colored pedestals. The DSL signal will degrade to a point that it won't work when the location of the modem in your home or business is 3 miles or more from the DSLAM."

Do you need network redundancy? At my house I could have both DSL through Century Link and connectivity through Comcast. If I depended on the internet connection for a living I would consider subscribing to both just in case there was a problem.

Check the shipping options and delays to make sure they fit the business model you have. Do people have time sensitive orders? Will the shipping costs for your customers go up based on where you live?

Will your livelihood be OK if your locked out for days or weeks due to fire evacuations. Will your business insurance carry you if your house and inventory burns down? Will your customers come back when you are back on-line?

What will happen if you want to move but it takes 2 or 3 yrs to sell your house? Do you have the funds to carry two homes?

Consider renting at first. You don't know if you will like living so far out and how everyone will adapt to the altitude. I have a friend who moved to Boulder from NJ. She had to move back to sea level because her daughter didn't adapt.

Keep an open mind about the front range. There are many options that are not cookie cutter, housing tracts or in a city environment.
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