U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-22-2013, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Pluto's Home Town
9,995 posts, read 11,670,449 times
Reputation: 5580

Advertisements

I know that some areas, like Boulder, tend to attract a young, exercise-crazy demographic, but overall, the state of Colorado seems to be thinner than most other states.


Mississippi is the fattest state for 6th straight year, Colorado still leanest, Rhode Island getting fatter, Alaska slimmer

Why do you think that might be?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-22-2013, 12:48 PM
 
20,896 posts, read 39,162,901 times
Reputation: 19172
IMO it's a reflection of the education and income levels.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2013, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,552 posts, read 10,257,939 times
Reputation: 9796
Tapeworms.

It actually has a lot to do with the climate as well. Even during the dead of summer you can spend decent amounts of time outside without feeling miserable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2013, 01:18 PM
 
11 posts, read 28,691 times
Reputation: 51
Based on personal experience, I would say that it has a lot to do with the weather. All this sunshine makes people want to go outdoors. It is also related to the fact that there is just so much available to do here, almost all of it in the great outdoors. And being outside, you also get to enjoy the endless beauty of our natural landscape. Win-win-win!

Most of the people at the gym I work out at have a lot of outdoor activities that supplement their gym regimens. Biking, hiking, running, skiing, kayaking, etc. And in my case, polo on horseback. All very athletic endeavors. Even those who feel that they are past the age for the extremeness of mountain biking or skiing, at least walk every day. Anyplace good in Colorado is most likely uphill! LOL This adds to the burning of excess calories. A shining example is last weekends "Pikes Peak Ascent (and Marathon). 13 miles UP HILL! Over 6,000 feet UP HILL! "... and if you're on the deluxe tour, you get to turn around and run back down..." The event fills up so fast, that a lot of people who want to do this, have already been beaten to the signup! I believe it sold out in under 3 days this year! "Hey, let's all run up that 14,000 foot mountain!" "Great idea! I'll race ya!" LOL

People here also seem to be slightly more in tune with "what" they put in their bodies as well. Most of my associates tend to eat more nutritiously than in other parts of the country that I have lived. I haven't met a lot of vegans, and only a few vegetarians, as most people tend to eat meals that are in balance. Even, not too large, portions of protiens, carbs and fiber-rich foods that can be quickly assimilated, burned off and digested.

In addition, due to the inherently, and sometimes excessively, dry climate, we drink A LOT of water! This also helps to flush excess fats and retained toxins from our bodies and keeps us effectively hydrated which also helps to keep everything in balance as well as filling us up with zero-calorie fluid.

I don't really believe that everyone in Colorado is necessarily focused on being "the fittest" or "the skinniest" state, we just love to be outside, doing fun things, and don't over eat because we filled up on water! IMO, of course!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2013, 02:51 PM
 
Location: right here
4,131 posts, read 4,775,741 times
Reputation: 4868
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Tapeworms.

It actually has a lot to do with the climate as well. Even during the dead of summer you can spend decent amounts of time outside without feeling miserable.

I agree...well not the Tapeworm part...

I know this sounds strange but I also believe it's because people feel safe and go outside-plus it's the vibe to take care of yourself -in other parts of the country-it's not the vibe.

As soon as I move back I'll be trying to lose the 10 pounds I found in Florida.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2013, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,869,863 times
Reputation: 9317
In most states, an 8.5 mile hike with an elevation gain of 2500 ft would deter all but the seriously diehard hikers, but not in Colorado where testing ourselves in the great outdoors is our un-official statewide religion. Even the out-of-state visitors get caught up in it. In Colorado, an 8.5 mile hike, from 8700 to 11,200 ft elevation is something that some foolhardy beginners attempt to do in bare feet. I bet the idiots won't try that again! Must be something in the thin Rocky Mountain air that causes people from the lowland states to simply ignore common sense.

In a conundrum over popular Colorado backcountry hot springs

We're almost too fit for our own good. It'll be interesting to see how this plays out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2013, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
2,394 posts, read 4,312,355 times
Reputation: 7536
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
In most states, an 8.5 mile hike with an elevation gain of 2500 ft would deter all but the seriously diehard hikers, but not in Colorado where testing ourselves in the great outdoors is our un-official statewide religion. Even the out-of-state visitors get caught up in it. In Colorado, an 8.5 mile hike, from 8700 to 11,200 ft elevation is something that some foolhardy beginners attempt to do in bare feet. I bet the idiots won't try that again! Must be something in the thin Rocky Mountain air that causes people from the lowland states to simply ignore common sense.

In a conundrum over popular Colorado backcountry hot springs

We're almost too fit for our own good. It'll be interesting to see how this plays out.
Saw many people with 1 Aquafina and hiking in all cotton and jeans just starting Mt Bierstadt at 1PM when the storms were rolling in. I'm amazed there aren't more hypothermia, dehydration, etc.. deaths. Maybe there are they just aren't broadcast on the news
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2013, 04:28 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,014 posts, read 20,323,805 times
Reputation: 22724
Default No

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Tapeworms.
You are so wrong.
Giardia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia is the correct answer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2013, 04:42 PM
 
1,579 posts, read 2,199,114 times
Reputation: 2751
Love for and proximity to the mountains for skiiing, mountain biking/racing, and other sports. Colorado has the best snow for skiiing, even over Europe, according to my brother. Also the presence of the military and job opportunities related to that. My brother has been a long-time, on-and-off resident of Colorado, now a retired naval commander/pilot, working currently as a defense contractor. He's a permanent fixture in Colorado/Utah since military retirement.

Last edited by smpliving; 08-22-2013 at 04:54 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2013, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Betwixt and Between
463 posts, read 982,217 times
Reputation: 421
There is a lot of info on the net about the correlation between weight loss and altitude.
Eg Obese People Lose Weight at High Altitudes | LiveScience

The higher up you go, the easier it is to lose weight. Since Colorado is one of the higher states, the altitude does affect the metabolic rates of the residents. Of course, an active lifestyle contributes to our health as well. I've spent a lot of time in the Andes and the Himalayas. When I got high enough, it just didn't matter what I ate; beer, bistek montados, ice cream, etc. still lost a lot of weight and I didn't have much fat to start with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top