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Old 08-25-2013, 09:08 AM
 
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I'm not sure how much they would like to "live off the land". I know my mom has a little veggie garden, and my dad and brother hunt - and they eat what they kill.
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Old 08-25-2013, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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wanneroo wrote: I have tons of fresh water, deer and other animals on the property, I could fish the trout out of the pond behind the house, I have tons of wild blackberry and raspberry bushes, a garden with plenty of veg that could be expanded quite a bit, blueberry bushes, over 20 apple and pear trees that produce thousands of fruit every year and even 5 acres of corn planted right now.

A little slice of heaven!
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Old 08-25-2013, 04:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhafer View Post
They love winter. My mom keeps her house between 60-65 year round and lives in Texas. My parents are somewhat survivalists, and would live to live off the land as much as possible. High altitude doesn't bother them at all.
My experience with most Texans--and I have relatives in Texas--is that they don't have a clue about what living in a rigorous montane climate is all about. The don't last long as year-round residents in a place like Pagosa. They may try if for a year, then they're scurrying off to someplace warm--either seasonally or permanently. In the southern Colorado/northern New Mexico area, a lot of recently transplanted "Tejanos" (that's the pejorative term given them by many of the local long-time residents) have been lulled into complacency by several very dry and warm winters compared to the norm. That region is known for having cycles of such winters, broken by extremely severe winters, with copious snow and frigid temperatures. The area is way overdue for one (and desperately in need of one to restore streamflows and water supplies).

And, unless "living off the land" means raising cattle on a big ranch (i.e., with a comma or two in the acreage enumeration), it's really not possible in the high altitude areas of Colorado--where growing seasons between freezing frosts are measured in days or weeks, not months. Also, living out in the boonies away from town seems romantic until one has to drive 50 or more miles roundtrip for just about everything--in a 15 mpg pickup or SUV slurping up $3.50-$4.00 or more per gallon fuel to do it. That "novelty" wears off pretty fast.
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Old 08-26-2013, 07:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
My experience with most Texans--and I have relatives in Texas--is that they don't have a clue about what living in a rigorous montane climate is all about. The don't last long as year-round residents in a place like Pagosa. They may try if for a year, then they're scurrying off to someplace warm--either seasonally or permanently. In the southern Colorado/northern New Mexico area, a lot of recently transplanted "Tejanos" (that's the pejorative term given them by many of the local long-time residents) have been lulled into complacency by several very dry and warm winters compared to the norm. That region is known for having cycles of such winters, broken by extremely severe winters, with copious snow and frigid temperatures. The area is way overdue for one (and desperately in need of one to restore streamflows and water supplies).

And, unless "living off the land" means raising cattle on a big ranch (i.e., with a comma or two in the acreage enumeration), it's really not possible in the high altitude areas of Colorado--where growing seasons between freezing frosts are measured in days or weeks, not months. Also, living out in the boonies away from town seems romantic until one has to drive 50 or more miles roundtrip for just about everything--in a 15 mpg pickup or SUV slurping up $3.50-$4.00 or more per gallon fuel to do it. That "novelty" wears off pretty fast.
Good points. I just know they like cold weather, and would prefer the cold climate. And my family (i.e. my mom and her siblings, and myself) grew up and lived on a 500 acre ranch (long story - but this property now belongs to my aunt, and not the family anymore). The nearest tiny town (much smaller than Pagosa Springs) was 10 miles away one way, and the closest big city was 40 miles away - one way. So they understand and know about "living in the boonies".

I'm sure they would do better living off the land in the more eastern states with mountains, but they have no desire to live there.
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Old 08-26-2013, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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jazzlover wrote: My experience with most Texans--and I have relatives in Texas--is that they don't have a clue about what living in a rigorous montane climate is all about.

You apparently have a belief that the only people who can handle living in rural Colorado are long time Colorado natives over the age of 60. Holding such a belief, it is par for the course that everyone you meet outside of that category, will PROVE you right. That's just the way the mind works. What you observe has little to do with Texans, and just about everything to do with your long held, deeply en grained belief.

Last edited by CosmicWizard; 08-26-2013 at 09:53 AM..
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Old 10-03-2013, 05:31 PM
 
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It is really a money issue, after all. If your folks are well to do, they won't have a big problem surviving around here. There are LOTS of locals who are willing to work.
As for buying and building... I think it is still a better proposition to buy a home, no matter where, than to build. Prices have come back a bit, but they are still nowhere near what they reached back in '07.
I think there is lots of good advice in this thread as well as some negativity. I do believe the best idea offered is to move up here and rent for a while.
Be advised; the further south you go from Pagosa Springs, the further you are from the super market, the hospital, the drug store, the gas stations, hardware stores, etc. I don't mean to say that Pagosa is a shoppers mecca, but you can find the basics... and Walmart is coming... or so they say.
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Old 10-03-2013, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Corona
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pagosan View Post
the hospital
You mean the clinic? The hospital is an hour away in Durango.
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Old 10-06-2013, 07:40 PM
 
Location: OKLAHOMA
1,783 posts, read 3,604,013 times
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Haven't they been working on the super Walmart for a few years? I also thought the clinic was a hospital too? Am I wrong? Pagosa, Chama NM and Trinidad are on my list for retiring if my ranch ever sells.
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Old 10-17-2013, 10:11 PM
 
31 posts, read 66,118 times
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Default nope

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado xxxxx View Post
You mean the clinic? The hospital is an hour away in Durango.
We now have a hospital with an emergency room. Wouldn't go there though.... expensive!
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Old 10-17-2013, 10:17 PM
 
31 posts, read 66,118 times
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Default well...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
My experience with most Texans--and I have relatives in Texas--is that they don't have a clue about what living in a rigorous montane climate is all about. The don't last long as year-round residents in a place like Pagosa. They may try if for a year, then they're scurrying off to someplace warm--either seasonally or permanently. In the southern Colorado/northern New Mexico area, a lot of recently transplanted "Tejanos" (that's the pejorative term given them by many of the local long-time residents) have been lulled into complacency by several very dry and warm winters compared to the norm. That region is known for having cycles of such winters, broken by extremely severe winters, with copious snow and frigid temperatures. The area is way overdue for one (and desperately in need of one to restore streamflows and water supplies).

And, unless "living off the land" means raising cattle on a big ranch (i.e., with a comma or two in the acreage enumeration), it's really not possible in the high altitude areas of Colorado--where growing seasons between freezing frosts are measured in days or weeks, not months. Also, living out in the boonies away from town seems romantic until one has to drive 50 or more miles roundtrip for just about everything--in a 15 mpg pickup or SUV slurping up $3.50-$4.00 or more per gallon fuel to do it. That "novelty" wears off pretty fast.
One or a family can live in Pagosa Springs for less than it costs to live in, for example, Denver. And one can find a hospital, or a coffee shop or a City Market and lots of restaurants here, too. You will just have to have a source of income.
But the area is most frequented by older adults seeking refuge from the noise and pace of big city living.
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