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Old 10-19-2006, 09:15 PM
 
295 posts, read 526,752 times
Reputation: 115

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gpraceman View Post
Maybe the biggest thing you will notice is that it has 2x6 outer walls as opposed to the 2x4 walls of a stick built home.
This is incorrect. Modular (factory built) and stick-built (site-built) homes must both conform to the same local building code. If the local code requires R-19 wall insulation, it'll be 2x6 exterior wall framing.
It is an unfortunate fact that Colorado has some of the worst nonuniform building codes in the nation, in particular with respect to insulation. Some cities and counties still allow R-13 or even only R-11 wall insulation (2x4 framing), even some within the greater Denver metro area!
This is an unfortunate result of Colorado's "Home Rule" law. Most states have a single uniform statewide building code; Colorado has an amazing patchwork quilt of codes, some up to 30 years out of date.
http://www.coloradoenergy.org/codes/colorado.aspx
Home can be built today in Colorado with inadequate insulation that's been illegal in most states for 20 years, including states like Washington which have much milder climates.

Last edited by RodFarlee; 10-19-2006 at 09:23 PM..
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Old 10-19-2006, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Highlands Ranch, CO
615 posts, read 2,761,705 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by RodFarlee View Post
Modular (factory built) and stick-built (site-built) homes must both conform to the same local building code. If the local code requires R-19 wall insulation, it'll be 2x6 exterior wall framing.
OK, that being the case, it seems that it would be hard to distinguish a modular home from a traditional stick built one, assuming both are of 2x6 construction.

It looks like for Douglas County, the minimum is R-16 in walls. I assume that would still be 2x4 construction.

Last edited by gpraceman; 10-19-2006 at 10:18 PM..
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Old 10-20-2006, 01:40 AM
 
295 posts, read 526,752 times
Reputation: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by gpraceman View Post
OK, that being the case, it seems that it would be hard to distinguish a modular home from a traditional stick built one, assuming both are of 2x6 construction.
Double-wides are pretty easy to tell... they're nearly always simple rectangular floor plans with low gable roofs. Just look for the exterior trim strip down the center of either end.
But the nicest triple-wides, with vaulted scissor-truss ceilings, double-wide "great rooms", bay windows, skylights, added decks and porches, poured foundations, etc could easily pass for site-built.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gpraceman View Post
It looks like for Douglas County, the minimum is R-16 in walls. I assume that would still be 2x4 construction.
Yes, with blown-in cellulose or foam insulation (not fiberglass batt).
Of course, that's really inadequate for Colorado winters.
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Old 10-20-2006, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Highlands Ranch, CO
615 posts, read 2,761,705 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by RodFarlee View Post
Double-wides are pretty easy to tell... they're nearly always simple rectangular floor plans with low gable roofs. Just look for the exterior trim strip down the center of either end.
But the nicest triple-wides, with vaulted scissor-truss ceilings, double-wide "great rooms", bay windows, skylights, added decks and porches, poured foundations, etc could easily pass for site-built.
According to Wardcraft Homes, they can build to any plan. I would never go for simple rectangles. Too boring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RodFarlee View Post
Yes, with blown-in cellulose or foam insulation (not fiberglass batt).
Of course, that's really inadequate for Colorado winters.
Our utility bills haven't been too bad. Of course, I'd like it even better if they were less.
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Old 10-20-2006, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
1,312 posts, read 6,902,108 times
Reputation: 710
In El Paso County, they are pretty popular amonsgt those that live east of the main city. Peyton, Calhan and such have a variety of housing from trailers to very nicely built custom homes. Lots of land out there and the people are, for the most part, pretty much those that like to keep to themselves or want to raise horses and such.

A woman that used to work for my father had a trailer on land and then built a house but you see some modulars out there.
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Old 10-22-2006, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Monterey Bay, California -- watching the sea lions, whales and otters! :D
1,906 posts, read 6,228,896 times
Reputation: 2606
I'm also looking into modular homes for Colorado! I used to live in Boulder when I was younger, but with prices the way they are now, I'm considering the Colorado Springs area.

Is there any overall general rule for modular homes? Any kind of index or site that shows the general public where one is acceptable. It seems I saw some in Ft. Collins on the MLS, but not sure. I think they were modular and not "mobile homes (trailers)."

I plan to retire in a couple of years and I don't know which would be more cost effective, building a small cottage modular home, or buying an already existing, but older, stick home? Any suggestions on that? Thank you!
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Old 10-22-2006, 07:24 PM
Status: "Celebrating 30 years as a Broker" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
10,883 posts, read 29,313,834 times
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Are you planning on retiring then moving to CS? or moving and in a couple more years retiring?
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Old 10-22-2006, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Monterey Bay, California -- watching the sea lions, whales and otters! :D
1,906 posts, read 6,228,896 times
Reputation: 2606
Logistically, the best way it seems for me to do this is to sell my home here in California (a small town, so it does not fetch as much as most California areas), and then probably have to rent awhile, unless I can somehow buy there before selling, or immediately buy there. It's a bit confusing to me.

What I understand is that it is better to buy while I am still working (for the broker). Therefore, I would have to sell here while I am working, and then rent, and THEN purchase there. It does seem convoluted, but that is the advice I have been given.

My price range I want to keep below $150,000 -- I am only one person, and do not need a lot of space. I'd like a yard (thus the modular concept as opposed to condos and association fees). I have a dog and a couple of cats. I only need one bedroom, one bath.

This would be in two years. My daughter will be in a California college then, and then I am able to retire. I currently live in the mountains of Santa Cruz -- my house is probably worth about $400 to $500,00 or so. I still owe about $245,000 on it (which includes my home equity loan for a new septic recently). Therefore, my lower price range. I do NOT want a mortgage. I also want to be in an area where I can preferably NOT have a car and can walk to bookstores, grocery stores, galleries, gift shops, etc. I lived in Denver before, and that did not appeal to me. Boulder still appeals in ways, but it is very young, and Colorado Springs or Fort Collins seem like a good compromise.

I hope this information helps. Any suggestions? Thank you.
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Old 10-27-2006, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Sapulpa, OK
7 posts, read 53,290 times
Reputation: 12
Duh, if not for mobile or modular homes, half the people in some of the small towns in Colorado wouldn't have anyplace to live.
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Old 10-28-2006, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Monument/ Colorado Springs
137 posts, read 717,865 times
Reputation: 52
In CS modular is a choice on "type of home"- along with "ranch". Many agents here list modular homes as "ranch" type. Some lenders will have an issue with a modular, but others will consider them the same- just shop around.
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