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Old 09-17-2015, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,561 posts, read 1,807,205 times
Reputation: 2659

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
I grew up in Phoenix and lived in Tucson for 8 years during college.

Arizona weather is nice from mid November through March. After that it's too hot to be outside. It can be over 100 deg at midnight during the summer.

But Colorado weather is nice from mid March through mid November. When it's too cold in January you can go outside with a down coat. In Arizona, when it's too hot you can take off everything and it's still too hot.

And I do enjoy the many fewer bugs here in Colorado. In Arizona, we had mean critters: Scorpions, rattlesnakes, tarantulas etc.

The ideal would be to have a place both in Tucson and in Colorado Springs and migrate during November and March.
When it's too hot outside in Arizona, just pull out the garden hose and wet yourself down. DONE!
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Old 09-17-2015, 06:44 PM
 
1,246 posts, read 919,506 times
Reputation: 1433
Downside, when you're really hungover the last thing you want is a bright sunny day. I wish there were more cool rainy days. But oh well. If I were back east I'd want more sun shine.
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Old 01-15-2016, 12:21 AM
 
191 posts, read 134,689 times
Reputation: 411
As a 37-year resident of Denver, I really appreciated PhilP's original post. This is a truth, not the sole truth, about our unique local climate. I might have written it myself, someday, but I feared being drowned out by so many who consider the Front Range a blessed paradise, like Hawaii with skiing.

Moving here from Tennessee, I was delighted to leave behind the sultry summers, ravenous ticks and mosquitoes, and grey, gloomy winters. Likewise, we get many, many transplants from the upper Midwest, seeking to escape the heavy, lingering snows of the Great Lakes, and the frigid winds of Chicago. Texans and Arizonans come up to beat the heat. In each case, Colorado is immediately pleasurable for what lacks, in comparison to the extremes of home. There's a notable lack of irritating weather... IF you can adapt to the altitude and the aridity.

Then there's the sun, blazing gloriously against a deep blue sky. Nothing looks finer in a photograph, and it's even better in person. It was a new experience to see 10, 50 miles or more into the distance with clarity and detail, like I'd gained Superman's x-ray vision. Again, Colorado's first impression shines, literally. But as I've passed 50, then 60, I've grown to dread the Colorado sunlight. Sunglasses -- good, expensive ones -- are as necessary as wallet and keys when I go out. Sunscreen or a hat are essential, too, since my dermatologist started carving off tumors like I was a whittlin' stick. Grab the later of water, and note how a simple walk or drive resembles a spacewalk. We are beyond the thickest third of the whole atmosphere.

If the best part of living here is being closer to the sky, the worst part is seen below the horizon. From late October to April, nights are below freezing. That's half a year between green seasons -- think about that. Tan, bleached grass, and brown tree limbs dominate every bit of terrain not erased by snow. Even the pine trees seem to lose green, turning dark olive drab.

Maybe one's appreciation for Colorado's appearance then depends on nothing more complicated than: What's your favorite color? Green or blue, pick one. Colorado will show you a wide, rich palette of blues all year long: a mountain lake, deep but transparent; a summer afternoon, bright blue infinity framing towering thunderheads; the general blue tint in everyday sunlight at altitude. (That's UV-heavy light, which burns cataracts, devours plastic items left in sunlight, and bleaches out red paint here.) Enjoy those blue skies, because for half the year, that's the only strong color you're likely to see, besides a brief sunset. (Did I mention that Front Range sunsets finish early, as the sun ducks under the elevated western skyline, without developing the deep golden light you see on a lower horizon? For a long, rich sunset, I'd recommend Kansas.)

But I'm missing green the the most. Maybe it's my Scotch-Irish heritage, but green speaks to me. The human eye is more sensitive to green light than any other. It's what told our ancient ancestors that they might be able to find a meal nearby.

Recently I've been visiting the Seattle area in fall and early spring, and I barely notice the grey skies for all the wealth of natural color below the horizon. A hundred greens are displayed by the well-watered foliage, and even browns have rich colors. Instead of Denver's dust to rob their color, you have a coating of raindrops or dew. Thus I see what I've been missing all these years. And I realize how ready I am to leave this place for somewhere a little wetter, a little lower, and little more mild.
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Old 01-15-2016, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,887 posts, read 102,301,239 times
Reputation: 32946
^^
Quote:
But I'm missing green the the most. Maybe it's my Scotch-Irish heritage, but green speaks to me. The human eye is more sensitive to green light than any other. It's what told our ancient ancestors that they might be able to find a meal nearby.
After 35 years here, coming from Pennsylvania via Illinois, I agree.
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Old 01-15-2016, 08:37 AM
 
1,822 posts, read 1,390,553 times
Reputation: 2087
I also agree. The blue skies are great, I'm neutral about snow and the weather, but the faded colors 1/2 of the year, and less shades and density of green in the summer (from what I've grown up with), are what really get me. It's kind of hard to get around that, after spending decades in such a different climate and landscape.

Last edited by Sunderpig2; 01-15-2016 at 08:48 AM..
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Old 01-15-2016, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Denver
3,182 posts, read 2,621,551 times
Reputation: 2206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheatridger View Post
As a 37-year resident of Denver, I really appreciated PhilP's original post. This is a truth, not the sole truth, about our unique local climate. I might have written it myself, someday, but I feared being drowned out by so many who consider the Front Range a blessed paradise, like Hawaii with skiing.

Moving here from Tennessee, I was delighted to leave behind the sultry summers, ravenous ticks and mosquitoes, and grey, gloomy winters. Likewise, we get many, many transplants from the upper Midwest, seeking to escape the heavy, lingering snows of the Great Lakes, and the frigid winds of Chicago. Texans and Arizonans come up to beat the heat. In each case, Colorado is immediately pleasurable for what lacks, in comparison to the extremes of home. There's a notable lack of irritating weather... IF you can adapt to the altitude and the aridity.

Then there's the sun, blazing gloriously against a deep blue sky. Nothing looks finer in a photograph, and it's even better in person. It was a new experience to see 10, 50 miles or more into the distance with clarity and detail, like I'd gained Superman's x-ray vision. Again, Colorado's first impression shines, literally. But as I've passed 50, then 60, I've grown to dread the Colorado sunlight. Sunglasses -- good, expensive ones -- are as necessary as wallet and keys when I go out. Sunscreen or a hat are essential, too, since my dermatologist started carving off tumors like I was a whittlin' stick. Grab the later of water, and note how a simple walk or drive resembles a spacewalk. We are beyond the thickest third of the whole atmosphere.

If the best part of living here is being closer to the sky, the worst part is seen below the horizon. From late October to April, nights are below freezing. That's half a year between green seasons -- think about that. Tan, bleached grass, and brown tree limbs dominate every bit of terrain not erased by snow. Even the pine trees seem to lose green, turning dark olive drab.

Maybe one's appreciation for Colorado's appearance then depends on nothing more complicated than: What's your favorite color? Green or blue, pick one. Colorado will show you a wide, rich palette of blues all year long: a mountain lake, deep but transparent; a summer afternoon, bright blue infinity framing towering thunderheads; the general blue tint in everyday sunlight at altitude. (That's UV-heavy light, which burns cataracts, devours plastic items left in sunlight, and bleaches out red paint here.) Enjoy those blue skies, because for half the year, that's the only strong color you're likely to see, besides a brief sunset. (Did I mention that Front Range sunsets finish early, as the sun ducks under the elevated western skyline, without developing the deep golden light you see on a lower horizon? For a long, rich sunset, I'd recommend Kansas.)

But I'm missing green the the most. Maybe it's my Scotch-Irish heritage, but green speaks to me. The human eye is more sensitive to green light than any other. It's what told our ancient ancestors that they might be able to find a meal nearby.

Recently I've been visiting the Seattle area in fall and early spring, and I barely notice the grey skies for all the wealth of natural color below the horizon. A hundred greens are displayed by the well-watered foliage, and even browns have rich colors. Instead of Denver's dust to rob their color, you have a coating of raindrops or dew. Thus I see what I've been missing all these years. And I realize how ready I am to leave this place for somewhere a little wetter, a little lower, and little more mild.
Good post! The main point I was trying to get across is not that Colorado is just terrible, but that everywhere else really isn't that bad. Most of the US, us included, have drawbacks to our benefits.

Like you said, the UV is the one that really bights, that isn't noticeable when you see Colorado in a picture. It really does get annoying if you are working or playing outside.

And, even this summer, while it was just gorgeous in June/July, by the end of August, it was already browning up. And people complain and complain about Minneapolis winters, but ours are just as long. We are warmer, but we both stay grey for the same amount of time.

Basically, summing it up, the big benefit of CO weather is that it is great for activity. Dry, and often in the 40s-60s, so you can go bicycling in November if you just feel like getting up and biking. No bugs to worry about, forget the raincoat, it's likely sunny...

The big downside is that it's ugly botanically speaking. It's not only brown, that's part of it, but it's a horrible state for growing things and the plant diversity is really lacking. Focusing on the micro rather than macro landscape, CO gets really repetitive and isn't that interesting. And the forests are ok, but they are nothing like the Pacific Northwest or even the pine forests of Wisconsin or Michigan.

People who really like it here hate (with a passion) overcast weather and muggy, thick summer days. That's the common thread I see.
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Old 01-15-2016, 10:03 AM
 
191 posts, read 134,689 times
Reputation: 411
Remember last Spring? For six weeks, we had periods of rain almost every day. Big thunderstorms rolling off the Rockies, and even some gentle, steady rain like we rarely get. Everything greened up beautifully, and stayed that way until the end of July. And for a few months, Denver did seem like a paradise. Still, plenty of folks were complaining. Rain can get in the way, complicate your plans or give you a chill. That's what they were noticing, but to me, it was a blessing form the skies. At least we wouldn't have forest fires that season, another common Colorado drawback that we haven't even dealt with yet.
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Old 01-15-2016, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
2,254 posts, read 4,506,023 times
Reputation: 2458
The only thing I don't like is that it can be as hot as hell in the summer. It can be like a desert but at least it almost always cools off at night (I'm talking Denver) The perfect weather to me at least 8000' or higher.
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Old 01-15-2016, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,174 posts, read 20,959,783 times
Reputation: 4258
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoisjongalt View Post
The only thing I don't like is that it can be as hot as hell in the summer. It can be like a desert but at least it almost always cools off at night (I'm talking Denver) The perfect weather to me at least 8000' or higher.
Same in Pueblo at about 5,000 feet. Sure it can be 95-105 in the day but cool off at night with a nice mountain breeze.
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Old 01-16-2016, 01:11 AM
 
Location: USA
1,024 posts, read 788,272 times
Reputation: 2314
When I visited Colorado a bit over a year ago (Summer 2014) I was making note of the arid "brownness" of the Western Slope (where I'd like to move—eventually). And I thought, "This is normal. I'm used to this." I'm from Southern California, so brown is fine with me. Arid is fine with me. Dry is fine with me.

And I guess the sun is too, but I'm from a much lower altitude. So I'd have to be wearing the long sleeves, the hats, and wearing the sunscreen and sunglasses. Well, everyone does, I guess.

I think I would adjust to this, as I'm already at least partway prepared, having spent most of my life in a place that is dry and arid and with its share of brown.

I'm finding this thread very helpful, though, as it's always good to be prepared.
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