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Old 01-17-2016, 08:54 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Dewpoint on hottest day (25th to 75th percentile via weatherspark):

Pittsburgh: 66F/58F
Kansas City: 71F/63F
Springfield, MA: 67F/58F [close to my current location]
New York: 68F/59F

I would have expected Springfield to be a bit lower. Also a map with annoying slideshow

United States Yearly [Annual] and Monthly Mean Maximum Dew Point Temperature

Has New York City at 65, Springfield 61, Pittsburgh 64, Kansas City 69 eyeballing from the map

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Nice pictures! I would suggest you go to Pittsburgh, say around August 1 to experience the humidity. Even as a kid, when it was my hometown and I didn't know any better, I thought it was humid as did virtually everyone else who lived there.
I'm not disagreeing it's humid, but it doesn't appear to be much more different than a lot of the Northeast. A bit more humid than where I live in New England, similar to where I used to live in downstate New York. And the deep south of course is far worse. But obviously anyone used to Colorado summers would find Pittsburgh very sticky.

Last edited by nei; 01-17-2016 at 09:03 PM..
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Old 01-17-2016, 09:02 PM
 
1,246 posts, read 918,519 times
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The wind in CO sucks. I live on the west side of the metro area and the wind can be brutal. A nice sunny day can be spent indoors due to wind here. I wish there were more rainy days though.

I lived in Pittsburgh, NC, FL, GA,TX and spend a lot of time in MI. The south has brutal weather in the summer. I came back from Houston last August and it was in the low 90's here. It felt so great compared to the TX heat. MI and PA aren't that bad and can cool down at night. Pittsburgh gets stagnant weather though but its pretty short lived 3-4 weeks a yr. I miss the fall weather in Pittsburgh though, but not the gray winters

Nowhere is perfect, everyone has their own tastes. The winters here aren't bad due to the amount of sunny days which is nice.
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Old 01-17-2016, 09:58 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
^^The average low in Duluth on June 15 is 52. It's 62 on August 2; 53 on Sept. 15, basically the summer months. Reports of freezing weather in Duluth in the summer are greatly exaggerated.
https://weatherspark.com/averages/30...-United-States

Weatherspark doesn't have Marquette, so here is a different link: Climate Marquette - Michigan and Weather averages Marquette
As you can see, the average lows in June, July and August are 51, 59 and 59. Again I'd say, reports of freezing weather in Marquette in the summer are greatly exaggerated.

I've been in Omaha in the summer. It's hot and humid. I lived in Champaign, IL for 7 years, lat. 40 degrees north. KC's latitude is 39 degrees north. It's hot there; it's humid. You can see the steam rising from the corn fields. I used to say you could give the weather forecasters the summer off there because the forecast, just about every day is: hazy, hot, humid with highs in the upper 80s to lower 90s, with a 25% chance of rain.

Somehow, I doubt you've experienced Pittsburgh's humidity.
Lows in the 50s in Summer are tolerable as well. I have visited Pittsburgh, the topography of the metro area does often lead to hazy, hot, and humid conditions. I'm sure air quality there now is better compared to 40+ years ago. I presently live in the Ohio Valley by Louisville so I'm well aware of the heat and humidity combination. Kansas City area is actually as bad or worse compared to here, although it often depends on the year or particular weather pattern. This past Summer didn't feature many high temperatures above 90F. My ideal climate would be Dfa, Northwoods vegetation, preferably close to one of the Great Lakes.
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Old 01-18-2016, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy87 View Post
The wind in CO sucks. I live on the west side of the metro area and the wind can be brutal. A nice sunny day can be spent indoors due to wind here. I wish there were more rainy days though.

I lived in Pittsburgh, NC, FL, GA,TX and spend a lot of time in MI. The south has brutal weather in the summer. I came back from Houston last August and it was in the low 90's here. It felt so great compared to the TX heat. MI and PA aren't that bad and can cool down at night. Pittsburgh gets stagnant weather though but its pretty short lived 3-4 weeks a yr. I miss the fall weather in Pittsburgh though, but not the gray winters

Nowhere is perfect, everyone has their own tastes. The winters here aren't bad due to the amount of sunny days which is nice.
I'll still take a windy day over a snowy day, just my opinion. Another beef I have during the summer is the afternoon thunderstorms, it ruins plans throughout the day. I'd prefer to have more clear days during the summer.
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Old 01-18-2016, 08:33 AM
 
Location: The analog world
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I honestly have no complaints. I grew up in the humid summer, icy winter Midwest. The Front Range feels like heaven to me.
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Old 01-18-2016, 04:09 PM
 
Location: The Springs
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Born here and have never lived anywhere but the west. But I'd traveled extensively for work during 18 years on the road.

2 places I remember the humidity very well indeed; One was Louisville in August. I'd arrived at the airport around midnight, stepped out of the terminal to get a cab and it was 90 degrees and 90% humidity, incredible. The other was after traveling in an air conditioned car most of the day, we'd stopped at a hotel outside Columbia, SC. I almost had a panic attack because when I got out, the air was so heavy I thought I was being smothered by a pillow. I'd experienced humidity during my travels, from East Texas, the Midwest, the South and the East Coast. But those two events hammered it home.

Hailing from a dry climate, I feel like a wimp.
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Old 01-18-2016, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
I honestly have no complaints. I grew up in the humid summer, icy winter Midwest. The Front Range feels like heaven to me.
I'd take a little cooler weather in July/early August. By that I mean highs in the upper 80s, rather than into the 90s. I think it's HOT at 90+, especially on clear days. Otherwise, no complaints.
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Old 01-18-2016, 06:21 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I'd take a little cooler weather in July/early August. By that I mean highs in the upper 80s, rather than into the 90s. I think it's HOT at 90+, especially on clear days. Otherwise, no complaints.
How many years did it take to adjust to the intense Colorado sun at higher elevation? When I visit I find that it really bothers me and I am very fair skinned. My sister is moving there in February (west side of Denver) so I could be visiting more frequently.
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Old 01-18-2016, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheatridger View Post
As a 37-year resident of Denver, I really appreciated PhilP's original post. This is a truth, not the sole truth, about our unique local climate. I might have written it myself, someday, but I feared being drowned out by so many who consider the Front Range a blessed paradise, like Hawaii with skiing.

Moving here from Tennessee, I was delighted to leave behind the sultry summers, ravenous ticks and mosquitoes, and grey, gloomy winters. Likewise, we get many, many transplants from the upper Midwest, seeking to escape the heavy, lingering snows of the Great Lakes, and the frigid winds of Chicago. Texans and Arizonans come up to beat the heat. In each case, Colorado is immediately pleasurable for what lacks, in comparison to the extremes of home. There's a notable lack of irritating weather... IF you can adapt to the altitude and the aridity.

Then there's the sun, blazing gloriously against a deep blue sky. Nothing looks finer in a photograph, and it's even better in person. It was a new experience to see 10, 50 miles or more into the distance with clarity and detail, like I'd gained Superman's x-ray vision. Again, Colorado's first impression shines, literally. But as I've passed 50, then 60, I've grown to dread the Colorado sunlight. Sunglasses -- good, expensive ones -- are as necessary as wallet and keys when I go out. Sunscreen or a hat are essential, too, since my dermatologist started carving off tumors like I was a whittlin' stick. Grab the later of water, and note how a simple walk or drive resembles a spacewalk. We are beyond the thickest third of the whole atmosphere.

If the best part of living here is being closer to the sky, the worst part is seen below the horizon. From late October to April, nights are below freezing. That's half a year between green seasons -- think about that. Tan, bleached grass, and brown tree limbs dominate every bit of terrain not erased by snow. Even the pine trees seem to lose green, turning dark olive drab.

Maybe one's appreciation for Colorado's appearance then depends on nothing more complicated than: What's your favorite color? Green or blue, pick one. Colorado will show you a wide, rich palette of blues all year long: a mountain lake, deep but transparent; a summer afternoon, bright blue infinity framing towering thunderheads; the general blue tint in everyday sunlight at altitude. (That's UV-heavy light, which burns cataracts, devours plastic items left in sunlight, and bleaches out red paint here.) Enjoy those blue skies, because for half the year, that's the only strong color you're likely to see, besides a brief sunset. (Did I mention that Front Range sunsets finish early, as the sun ducks under the elevated western skyline, without developing the deep golden light you see on a lower horizon? For a long, rich sunset, I'd recommend Kansas.)

But I'm missing green the the most. Maybe it's my Scotch-Irish heritage, but green speaks to me. The human eye is more sensitive to green light than any other. It's what told our ancient ancestors that they might be able to find a meal nearby.

Recently I've been visiting the Seattle area in fall and early spring, and I barely notice the grey skies for all the wealth of natural color below the horizon. A hundred greens are displayed by the well-watered foliage, and even browns have rich colors. Instead of Denver's dust to rob their color, you have a coating of raindrops or dew. Thus I see what I've been missing all these years. And I realize how ready I am to leave this place for somewhere a little wetter, a little lower, and little more mild.
I definitely share some of your feelings re: Denver's climate shortcomings. However, compare Denver's climate to Chicago, and I'd pick Denver in a heart beat. BTW, you are a very talented writer!
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Old 01-18-2016, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
How many years did it take to adjust to the intense Colorado sun at higher elevation? When I visit I find that it really bothers me and I am very fair skinned. My sister is moving there in February (west side of Denver) so I could be visiting more frequently.
I'm so white I can get a sunburn from the refrigerator light and I do just fine here. Spent the first 10 years of my life in Wisconsin and 12 years in Dallas after college. I'll never willingly live in a humid climate ever again.
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