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Old 01-21-2009, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Santa Fe, NM
125 posts, read 401,132 times
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Colorado School of Mines is rumored to rival New Mexico School of Mines, one of the toughest, top ranked engineering universities in the country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reluctant Coloradan View Post
I am sort of new to Colorado, and my children will be looking for a college in a couple of years. How are the Colorado colleges compared to the rest of the country? I really think that age 18 is too young to ship a kid halfway around the country and would prefer to keep them near to home at least the first 2 years. But there is so much bad news coming from CU and CSU all the time. Plus, my oldest child is pretty exceptional and doesn't need a mediocre academic experience. Any advice from alumni or long term (maybe even "native") Coloradans? Thanks in advance.
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:49 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,785,875 times
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I agree with the others who say that one's attitude and motivation are at least as important as--if not far more important than--the college chosen for an education. I attended little ol' Western State College in Gunnison. I got a pretty darned good education there that has served me quite well in my professional career(s) since.

That said, different schools have different strengths--e.g., Colorado School of Mines being the best engineering school in the state. The biggest issue facing Colorado public colleges and universities is funding. General and capital budgets for Colorado colleges and universities are heavily dependent on the general state budget, which is severely constrained by the provisions of the TABOR Amendment to the Colorado Consitution--ESPECIALLY in a "down" economy. So, either the quality and variety of educational programs are going to see a very significant decline, or tuition is going to have to increase significantly--there aren't much of any other options. That debate is already underway in this year's legislative session.
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Old 01-21-2009, 09:41 PM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,742,357 times
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Jazz is right. Our legislative straightjacket is wreaking havoc on higher education in this state, and so far the politicians shown no leadership and the public little will to find solutions. There's actually serious talk of privatizing all the state colleges. That's not all that likely, but it might be more responsible if they DID privatize them then starving them for less and less funds, forcing them to hike tuition on a yearly basis. At the rate tuition is rising, it will soon be cheaper for a Colorado student to go out of state to UW in Laramie than to stay in state at CU in Boulder.
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Old 01-21-2009, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,674,043 times
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Maybe the people on the Phoenix forum were right after all... maybe Coloradans do suck, voting in assinine laws like the Tabor Amendment? The state of Arizona sent me to their largest school for a four year full ride merit scholarship plus living expenses, and my home state of Colorado can't even cough up enough money to maintain their universities-- even with gobbs of sky-high out of state tuition money pouring in. Colorado neither has nor had anything like that. And this is besides the situation of the current economy-- Colorado higher education was hurting even several years ago. What is a state's higher education system if not a reflection of its citizens who fund it?
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Old 01-21-2009, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Denver 'burbs
21,848 posts, read 23,076,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tfox View Post
At the rate tuition is rising, it will soon be cheaper for a Colorado student to go out of state to UW in Laramie than to stay in state at CU in Boulder.
If your child has halfway decent grades, it already is cheaper....
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Old 01-22-2009, 09:37 AM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,742,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
If your child has halfway decent grades, it already is cheaper....
No surprise. It's because Wyoming VALUES higher ed. I looked it up and they contribute $12,000 per student to their public university in funding, the highest in the country. Where's Colorado? We're #47 and dropping.

Why don't we follow the lead of New Mexico and Georgia and offer a HOPE scholarship program, where we fund the in-state tuition of students with lottery money? In New Mexico, virtually any student capable of getting into college can also get the state to pay for it, provided they can keep a 2.5 GPA in college.
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Old 01-22-2009, 11:38 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,785,875 times
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Having lived in both Colorado and Wyoming, I can tell you unequivically that Wyoming does a much better job funding education per pupil than does Colorado. First, Wyoming only has around 500,000 residents, which makes things much more manageable and individualized when it comes to education. Second, Wyoming derives much of its tax revenue from minerals prouduction--and, unlike Colorado, is not afraid to tax that production at reasonable levels, instead of basically letting companies mine or drill depleting resources at relatively minimal tax rates. Wyoming understands that once the minerals are gone, then so is the revenue stream. So, they collect enough revenue from that production to fund current needs AND build a permanent trust fund for the future. In that regard, Wyoming is a hell of lot smarter than Colorado . . .
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Old 01-23-2009, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,174 posts, read 20,961,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Having lived in both Colorado and Wyoming, I can tell you unequivically that Wyoming does a much better job funding education per pupil than does Colorado. First, Wyoming only has around 500,000 residents, which makes things much more manageable and individualized when it comes to education. Second, Wyoming derives much of its tax revenue from minerals prouduction--and, unlike Colorado, is not afraid to tax that production at reasonable levels, instead of basically letting companies mine or drill depleting resources at relatively minimal tax rates. Wyoming understands that once the minerals are gone, then so is the revenue stream. So, they collect enough revenue from that production to fund current needs AND build a permanent trust fund for the future. In that regard, Wyoming is a hell of lot smarter than Colorado . . .
Then why is it companies and people want to move to Colorado and not Wyoming?
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Old 01-23-2009, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,889 posts, read 102,319,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
Then why is it companies and people want to move to Colorado and not Wyoming?
Good question. Though I do think we could learn from our neighbor to the north and increase funding for education, both K-12 and higher ed. I read an article in the paper recently that said that some legislators are going to try to tweak "Bruce" so that it's not so onerous. As it stands, if the budget drops due to a drop in collections, that becomes the new baseline against which increases can be made (inflation plus growth). It could take years to recoup from the recession.
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Old 01-23-2009, 11:23 AM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,742,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
As it stands, if the budget drops due to a drop in collections, that becomes the new baseline against which increases can be made (inflation plus growth). It could take years to recoup from the recession.
Ref C should have temporarily halted the ratchet effect. Once Ref C expires, however, they HAVE to have something else in place, otherwise the ratchet effect will basically lead to a doomsday scenario in which state government simply can't function. The failed amendment 59 was an attempt to halt the ratchet effect for good.

I firmly believe that the public doesn't fully understand the ramifications of the ratchet effect and what the consequences are. The state really needs to the BOTH parties speaking with a united voice on a budget solution, much like they did back when Ref C was successful.
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