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Old 09-11-2015, 06:17 PM
 
Location: on a hill
346 posts, read 391,774 times
Reputation: 454

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hschlick84 View Post
The Rocky Mountain region from north Montana to south New Mexico will become a liberal bastion similar to the west and east coast in another 100 years unfortunately.
No it won't. Not enough water. Ugh, God forbid.
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Old 09-11-2015, 08:07 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,697 posts, read 4,333,575 times
Reputation: 10278
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttsch10 View Post
I apologize for the lack of direction in my post. To be honest at the time I didn't really know what to ask...I just didn't want it to be another "I want to move here and I need advice".

It is really interesting to read about the states past from some of the natives.

For me I would like to get past the idealistic "Colorado Dream" phase before I start looking into it as a place to call home...I figure most people in their 20's kind of move with that dream in their mind without really thinking into the logistics. So for me, learning about the long term future of the state is important.

I was focused on Denver because it's the major CO city I know about the most. I would either like to live in a remote, medium sized city in the mountains, or within the city limits of Denver. I just fear that Denver might turn into something like San Francisco, where if you didn't get in within the last few years you are kind of screwed. Same goes for the mountain towns. I would hope that all of the good, and reasonable, places to live don't get all purchased up in the next few years.
The subject of finding "good, and reasonable, places to live" in "a remote, medium sized city in the mountains" is a topic of constant debate on this board. You need to define "reasonable" and also what size town you consider "medium sized" and finally, what you would consider as "remote." Some folks consider one of Denver's more far flung suburbs as "remote." Me, I define remote as any place at least 400 miles away from the Front Range with no near-by Interstate. As always, my take on this subject is that anyone wanting to find an affordable place to live in remote mountain town that offers decent jobs is already 20 years too late to come to the table. Prices in mountain resort towns like Vail or Aspen are astronomical. Other "remote" Colorado towns are remote enough, but they don't have much of an employment base or much of anything else going on for them. In my part of Colorado which is the Four Corners area, the best I could suggest is to seek employment in Durango (remote but expensive) and look for housing in a little town like Mancos (more remote but lower housing costs). You'll have to be willing to make a commute of about 45 to 50 miles each way and not be afraid of winter driving to pull this one off. However, real estate values in Mancos are climbing as more people get priced out of Durango, so you'd better act fast.

Your best bet is probably somewhere within the city limits of Denver. Stand back and wait for the current housing crunch in Denver to improve (which it always has - in the past, anyhow) and then check out neighborhoods near the University of Denver or in Cherry Creek. Those two neighborhoods are the ones I'm most familiar with, but there are many other nice neighborhoods in Denver, and you could get more current information by posting a question up above in the Denver forum.
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Old 09-12-2015, 07:24 AM
 
3,492 posts, read 4,934,395 times
Reputation: 5377
Mid sized cities are generally cities in the 200k to 1 million range. I put together a chart of the terms once, but have no idea where I posted that.

Regardless, if the OP wants a mid-sized city, the only one in the state is Colorado Springs. Eventually Fort Collins will join the list.

As for my expectations for both Denver and the state: Housing prices can not grow this fast indefinitely, but they will continue a strong upwards trajectory for most of the next decade. Until several other states legalize weed, we will have an abundance of younger people moving here. Remember that these people could get weed anywhere, it is NOT difficult. They choose to do it in Colorado because they want it to be legal. Don't demonize people too hard for choosing to move so they can follow the law that better represents them.

Hopefully our government won't go the way of California, but every person that says that means something else. There are simply too many elements to a government of a large state to sum it up in one single aspect.

The simple truth is that as people are getting better at acquiring information, more of them will recognize how great the weather and scenery are on the front range. That is going to bring more people to Denver. If jobs allow more telecommuting, that will bring more people to the Springs for lower prices with the same great weather. One factor that will curb the growth in prices is an increase in mortgage rates, but that has not happened yet and is unlikely to happen substantially in the near future. I would explain it, but it would take a page and leave most readers confused.

Water may be an issue, but the state may start enacting more laws to prevent the waste of water which would allow far more people to be supported. Currently 50% of water is outdoor use and most of that could be curbed. Granted, some people will be angry that they cannot water the lawn, but I wouldn't be shocked by rules over the next 20 years that new homes must be xeri-scaped in the front. Relying solely on economics does not work. A rich person does not have more right to water their lawn than a poor person has to drink water. Basic economics says the rich person always has superior demands, but morality says he does not.
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Old 09-12-2015, 09:02 AM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,949 posts, read 20,201,871 times
Reputation: 22575
Default It is all downhill from here

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
I can't figure out the graph you included in your post. It looks to me like its showing that somewhere around 2004, Denver began to acquire MORE treated water than there was an actual demand for. So what is Denver doing with all that extra water?
1. Green = customers, Blue = Demand (usage, not supply).
2. Per capita of water usage has fallen by 40% in the last 25 years.
3. The falling blue line is the result of people cutting their water usage. Huge drops come when we have watering restrictions. Increases come with population increases and no restrictions (such as this year). But, the relentless campaign of the last 10+ years to "use less" has cut usage. Denver is somewhat unique in this manner. Most cities see a quick bounceback to previous consumption levels once the emergency is over.
4. Denver does not acquire treated water. Denver Water acquires raw water and treats it.
5. I presume that excess water is dumped. Colorado water laws pretty much force you to take 100% of your annual allocation (rights) or lose it. But, I am not a water lawyer. One bit of anecdotal evidence is that right now there is water flowing in the ditch near my house. This is Clear Creek water owned by Denver Water. I have never seen it flowing in September. And, why would you need irrigation water this late in the season?
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Old 09-12-2015, 12:07 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,697 posts, read 4,333,575 times
Reputation: 10278
^^^
Thank you for clarifying that for me. I must have sat there for 10 minutes, staring at my computer screen and trying to figure that graph out.
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Old 09-12-2015, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Augusta, Kan
45 posts, read 46,635 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy87 View Post
I wouldn't live here unless I had a good job and I am very fortunate and grateful for it. If something were to happen I would sell the house and cash in. I honestly dont know how ppl get by that move here just for pot unless that have a mommy and daddy fund.

Do you really think people are moving there just for that reason? I know the job market is bombing in Denver area but the whole move to Colorado just for pot is far fetch......then aging it's Americans we are talking about.
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Old 09-12-2015, 11:32 PM
 
1,513 posts, read 1,479,853 times
Reputation: 1468
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy87 View Post
Grand Rapids and MI are very underrated. Good outdoor rec, parks, Lakes, L. MI shoreline is great and a good microbrew scene. It would be on my short list of places to move to.
Grand Rapids is the country's sleeper next Big City under the radar. It's CSA is 1.3 million people, and it's economy is booming with an expansive bustling downtown. The problem, that a lot of people are facing, is finding housing.
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Old 09-13-2015, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,051 posts, read 2,079,489 times
Reputation: 3536
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinebluestem View Post
Do you really think people are moving there just for that reason?
Absolutely. I"ve seen a human interest story on the tv news probably every three months about some family who has moved here for access to the medical side of marijuana. In these forums in the past month I've seen at least a couple of topics about people wanting to move here for the recreational side of it.
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Old 09-13-2015, 11:50 AM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,949 posts, read 20,201,871 times
Reputation: 22575
Default I saw it with my own eyes

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
the tv news
Which is a true statistical reflection of reality.
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Old 09-13-2015, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,051 posts, read 2,079,489 times
Reputation: 3536
I wouldn't put much faith in any broadcast entity to be a true reflection of any statistical reality but their own.

The statement was made that people moving here just for weed was far fetched. I'm simply pointing out that there are people who do move here for access to marijuana products, whether medicinal or recreational. I did not make any statement of percentages or likelihood or the gross numbers moving here for weed.
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