U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-02-2015, 10:31 AM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,490,262 times
Reputation: 6922

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Okay, this is true. Fort Collin is far enough north to not fall into the geography of Denver metro, so lets call it 4 cities. Other than that, I'd say all the others are large towns, not necessarily cities with suburbs and exburbs. Tomato, tahmato. Although the whole area north of Denver to Fort Collins is uniquely different than the front range south of Denver due to all the small town concentration in the area.
The areas north of Denver to Fort Collins does have many small towns. The reason is that the areas north of Denver have more water resources than south of Denver and consequently have much farming; with water nearby making it possible to establish cities and town. The areas south of Denver have little water and consequently no agriculture and few towns. If you look at satellite images of the area you can see what I mean.

You do not see farming and agricultural along the immediate front range until you get to the Arkansas River Valley going east from Pueblo.

That has a big significance for today as those unique towns north of the city are very much desirable for residential development because of more water resources and also have the characteristics of these small agricultural communities to build communities.

Areas just south of Denver, especially Douglas County and the city of Castle Rock, have severe stress in acquiring water for their expanding residential development. I know some of you will take offense and say Douglas County and Castle Rock are consider good places to live by some and being fast growing but those sprawling housing developments are not sustainable.

The future of development will move more to the north of Denver into Adams, Weld and Larimer County. Fort Collins and Loveland are often rated as the best places to live in the nation. Adding that to the fast growth of Broomfield County, East Boulder County with Louisville (which is also rated the best place) and Lafayette, the north areas from Denver is where will be more development of housing, jobs and public transit with good quality of life.

Unfortunately much of this residential development will eat up good agricultural land and acquire the water rights that have been formally for farming.

We should never forget that WATER is KING in the Great West.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 11-02-2015 at 10:41 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-03-2015, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,037 posts, read 2,056,189 times
Reputation: 3510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunderpig2 View Post
LOL. How about City of Loveland, City of Longmont, City of Aurora, etc? There are at least 24 cities in the state (see table in below link), and probably many more as well:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado
Yes, there are many places that call themselves suchand even if they are structurally and politically a city, a lot of those are exburbs of Denver and to an outsider, they are all Denver metro. To that point, of the top ten cities on that list, only three are not in contiguous to Denver. Hence, four cities
...and Boulder. City and county of Boulder is a category of its own...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2015, 08:36 AM
 
1,822 posts, read 1,383,178 times
Reputation: 2087
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
only three are not in contiguous to Denver. Hence, four cities
...and Boulder. City and county of Boulder is a category of its own...
Gunnison, Aspen, Glenwood Springs, Steamboat Springs, Grand Junction, Fruita.... That's at least 6 cities that are not "contiguous" to the other large cities you mention. There are more cities than you seem to want to acknowledge.

Last edited by Sunderpig2; 11-03-2015 at 09:03 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2015, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,037 posts, read 2,056,189 times
Reputation: 3510
Nope. Those are all towns. Slightly larger towns, but still towns in my opinion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2015, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Na'alehu Hawaii/Buena Vista Colorado
4,857 posts, read 9,586,952 times
Reputation: 4893
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Nope. Those are all towns. Slightly larger towns, but still towns in my opinion.
Maybe you could help us understand your comments by providing your definition of "city" and "town". I'm confused as to why you think that Grand Junction, which is a city of 60,000 population, is merely a town.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2015, 11:13 AM
 
1,822 posts, read 1,383,178 times
Reputation: 2087
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Nope. Those are all towns. Slightly larger towns
Okay, so a legal definition of "city" has no value, and is meaningless then. I get it

You need to contact all of those cities - I mean towns - and tell them to change all their letterheads, memos, news bulletins, and other documents to show their demoted "town" status. Good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2015, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,037 posts, read 2,056,189 times
Reputation: 3510
My posts regarding this were all in my opinion. Yours may differ. Obviously some of these municipalities opinion's differ. Then again, Colorado City south of Pueblo isn't even a town, they are a census area, yet they call themselves City. In the OP's few posts, the presence of a at least a Sam's Club seems to indicate city status. As we are seeing, there is no consistent application of the term and Colorado lacks even a legal definition of such. I could care less if they call themselves the Kingdom of. It is not a personal crusade to have everything so cleanly defined. That's the wonderful thing about it being my opinion, I don't have to enforce that opinion on any of those municipalities and I certainly don't plan to do so.

For definition, I'd say simply ask someone living there. I'd venture a guess that if you ask anyone living in any of those 60k and less population centers if they live in a city, most would say no, despite what their legal structure is, what the council says, or what their letter head and advertising says. For my personal opinion, I'd say over 100k in population, the presence of suburbs, a diverse economic base, the ability to support local financial action without association to a major metropolitan bank, diverse recreational activities beyond fishin' and 4 wheelin', a cultural scene a bit bigger than the local art galley. There are also the negative aspects of it all such as increased traffic, crime, homelessness, mental breakdowns and substance abuse and the associated entities reaching to address those issues. We also could look at differing levels of trauma center ratings in dealing with some of those negatives.

I don't doubt there are large towns/small cities that can meet some of those expectations and there may be some close to meeting most of what I would consider a city. No doubt some will get there very soon. I've said it before and its probably still worth mentioning, Colorado's population has only ever increased and it is going to continue to do so. Heck, if the context of city is taken on a national level, it is not uncommon to only ever see Denver referenced for Colorado and even Cos doesn't rate. How's that possible for a city with half a million people? Just because I don't see Cos labeled on every national map of Colorado doesn't mean I feel the need to petition whatever news agency posted it to correct it. That's just the way it is.

Then again, maybe if the OP had said I'm looking for X population centers with Y amenities with Z locations, we wouldn't have been able to have this fine tangent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2015, 04:07 PM
 
5,310 posts, read 7,140,000 times
Reputation: 5035
La Junta and Lamar are often the warmest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2015, 04:31 PM
 
Location: The 719
14,460 posts, read 22,294,090 times
Reputation: 13783
Which seat on the Titanic was the driest?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2015, 06:16 PM
 
Location: The 719
14,460 posts, read 22,294,090 times
Reputation: 13783
Quote:
Originally Posted by otowi View Post
La Junta and Lamar are often the warmest.
Really? They can be just as cold as the Front Range if not colder. They sit right along the Ark Valley and when it snows there, it snows sideways.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top