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Old 11-02-2015, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,885 posts, read 6,460,372 times
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Colorado rurality an urban legend - The Denver Post

Quote:
Nine counties in a corridor stretching from Colorado Springs to Fort Collins account for 80 percent of jobs in the state.

An additional six counties, home to mostly smaller cities in outlying areas, places such as Grand Junction and Pueblo, bring that total up to 89 percent of jobs.

Colorado's remaining 49 counties contribute just 11 percent of the state's total jobs, including several that started strong more than a century ago but haven't kept pace in the decades since.
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Old 11-02-2015, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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No surprise there, IMO.
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Old 11-02-2015, 04:18 PM
 
Location: The 719
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That map is the answer to 95% of the threads started by newbies to this relocation forum.

What the map doesn't show is the fact that within the Yellow areas, some are even more yellow than others.
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Old 11-02-2015, 05:26 PM
 
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Colorado, the state, is highly rural by land area. Coloradans are highly urbanized. The former makes Colorado somewhat different at state level than many states where the land area is more highly urbanized across the entire state. But the front range on its own would be more similar.

# of CO counties which are above national avg. density of 88 people per square mile? 9 front range counties. Below? 55. # above 500 people per square mile? Just 4. # above 1000/sq. mile? Just 2.

Overall density of Colorado? 49 people per square mile. Good for 36th place.

The population is urbanized but there are degrees of density. Denver County is the 23rd most dense county in U.S.. Broomfield 79th. No other CO counties in top 100. Denver population is more dense per square mile than Los Angeles County by about 50% but has only 4% of the density of density leader Manhattan.

Last edited by NW Crow; 11-02-2015 at 06:29 PM..
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Old 11-02-2015, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,753 posts, read 4,863,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McGowdog View Post
That map is the answer to 95% of the threads started by newbies to this relocation forum.

What the map doesn't show is the fact that within the Yellow areas, some are even more yellow than others.
Did those yellow areas ever have jobs besides Agriculture, ranching, or mining?
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Old 11-02-2015, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,170 posts, read 20,920,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Did those yellow areas ever have jobs besides Agriculture, ranching, or mining?
Fremont county and Teller counties have and do.
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Old 11-02-2015, 06:02 PM
 
Location: The 719
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Like what?

Lamar had Neoplan from about 1981 until about 2006.

Colorado City had DoRay lamp company which became Columbia House, a 1,000,000 sq ft facility that provided many jobs for folks from Pueblo down to Walsenburg and beyond, until about 2002.

Huerfano County, Crowley County, Otero County, Fremont County and other places have or at one time had the DOC industries.

Anadarko and various energy companies throughout the eastern plain towns like Cheyenne Wells for example. That area also was once a boom in the 70s with oil drilling, Murfin Oil, etc.

Lamar competed with Garden City Kansas for IBP, Iowa Beef Packing, which eventually became Tyson Chicken. Many of the folks from Garden City said Lamar was better off for not getting that aquisition.

I don't know what all the Western Slope has to offer besides the things you mentioned, farming, ranching, mining, energy related jobs, tourism...

There are quite a few jobs that any decent sized community could offer to maintain itself, ain't it? Things such as education, administration, law enforcement, transportation, water treatment, streets maintenance, etc.

Rec mj production and sales, perhaps someday hemp products, drug and alcohol recovery, counseling and other rackets er opportunities like that...
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
The article says we are quite similar to other Western states in this regard, but with a larger population.



I suppose you could say the casino industry in Teller and Gilpin, but it is quite small when viewed as a percentage of employment in the state.
Yeah, there is that. Any jobs help, though few they may be. Folks travel far to work up there. Ignacio has a nice casino too.

Last edited by McGowdog; 11-02-2015 at 06:14 PM..
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Old 11-02-2015, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,885 posts, read 6,460,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NW Crow View Post
Colorado, the state, is highly rural by land area. Coloradans are highly urbanized. The former makes Colorado somewhat different at state level than many states where the land area is more highly urbanized across the entire state. But the front range on its own would be more similar.
The article says we are quite similar to other Western states in this regard, but with a larger population.

Quote:
Originally Posted by McGowdog View Post
Like what?
I suppose you could say the casino industry in Teller and Gilpin, but it is quite small when viewed as a percentage of employment in the state.
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Old 11-02-2015, 06:59 PM
 
1,032 posts, read 563,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
No surprise there, IMO.
No surprise at all indeed, you could produce a similar map for pretty much any state.

I'm sure in Maryland 6 counties + 1 Baltimore (independent city) out of 24 (23+1) county level entities would account for 80% of the jobs as well, and 80% of the population.

The same could be done for Washington or Oregon, Nevada for sure, Minnesota and Indiana would produce some interesting maps. South Dakota would be bifurcated, and North Dakota split into 3's. The only states I could see with slightly more even spread would be Ohio and a good bit of the South, but even then places like Atlanta would cause things to cluster.

It's just natural. Urban areas are where the jobs are. (duh). There's a reason only 2% of the population is engaged in agriculture, and only a handful more percentage points provide services out in rural areas which accounts for the rest of the population.
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Old 11-03-2015, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,885 posts, read 6,460,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InchingWest View Post
No surprise at all indeed, you could produce a similar map for pretty much any state.

I'm sure in Maryland 6 counties + 1 Baltimore (independent city) out of 24 (23+1) county level entities would account for 80% of the jobs as well, and 80% of the population.

The same could be done for Washington or Oregon, Nevada for sure, Minnesota and Indiana would produce some interesting maps. South Dakota would be bifurcated, and North Dakota split into 3's. The only states I could see with slightly more even spread would be Ohio and a good bit of the South, but even then places like Atlanta would cause things to cluster.

It's just natural. Urban areas are where the jobs are. (duh). There's a reason only 2% of the population is engaged in agriculture, and only a handful more percentage points provide services out in rural areas which accounts for the rest of the population.
Nationally 75% of the population is urban, not rural. In the Northeast and Western states it is 90%. A significant difference.

Says this in the 4th paragraph of the article.
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