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Old 01-21-2016, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
199 posts, read 179,595 times
Reputation: 269

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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarrySkiesAbove View Post
Have you thought about the Idaho panhandle (Coeur d'Alene, Sandpoint, Hayden etc)? You get the mountains, hiking, beautiful lakes and it's very green and although not humid like Florida, it is more humid than Colorado so you don't have to carry chapstick in your pocket 24/7


Coeur d'Alene is 33 miles to Spokane WA if you need a bigger city fix from time to time. Summers are glorious, winters get a good amount of snow and are pretty cloudy (which is why the area is so lush) but if you can handle that, you would have your combination of mountains, hiking, camping, boating and green landscapes.
I am most definitely checking these out! Thank you so much!
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Old 01-21-2016, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,522 posts, read 10,187,795 times
Reputation: 9752
Another possibility is Rapid City, SD. The Black Hills aren't near as tall as the Rockies, but they right there and they're very lush. The only potential downsides are bitterly cold winters, difficulty finding jobs, and having to deal with tourists from Memorial Day 'til Labor Day.
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Old 01-21-2016, 04:42 PM
 
1,822 posts, read 1,389,155 times
Reputation: 2087
Are mountains the main draw? Other states have mountains *and* more vegetation, density/variation of trees, and shades of green. I've been all around CO, and it all looks dry and faded. If your eyes and mind are used to lots of green (and in this case, it has been your entire life, and most of mine too), there's no way to force them to act/respond differently. It's deep down, connecting the senses, the mind, the soul.

It's been interesting learning all of this first-hand, and going from nearly sea-level tropical to three years plus of very dry and an altitude of 5000'. But even disappointments with the scenery and environment have taken a backseat to larger issues.

Oregon, for one, has much more green and more variety, and has utterly beautiful areas that can't be rivaled in CO. Every time I visit there, it's like "Wow!" The Willamette Valley is dense with color, and the air is rich and arromatic. Nature is fully alive, and not just for a few months, but all year. OR has the coast, the wetter/greener areas, and the drier eastern portion. Bend is a mountainous city. There are lots of places in the middle of the two large zones, where one could possibly find the right balance of scenery and moisture.

Last edited by Sunderpig2; 01-21-2016 at 05:03 PM..
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Old 01-21-2016, 04:46 PM
 
Location: USA
1,024 posts, read 787,697 times
Reputation: 2314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunderpig2 View Post
Are mountains the main draw? Other states have mountains *and* more vegetation, density/variation of trees, and shades of green. I've been all around CO, and it all looks dry and faded. If your eyes and mind are used to lots of green (and in this case, it has been your entire life), there's no way to force them to act/respond differently. It's deep down, connecting the senses, the mind.
I can identify with this SO much! But the opposite. I am used to mountains, I connect to them in the same way you connect to the green. The green I like, but can live without, but the mountains—that's a different thing.

You may want to branch out, as others have said, and look for some other western state which has more green and the mountains.

Quote:
It's been interesting learning all of this first-hand, and going from nearly sea-level tropical to very dry and an altitude of 5000'. Was "the experiment" worth all the money lost in the relocation and frustration with the regional job scene here? Nope! I'm glad to pass on the results of the study though, since it was lacking on this forum years ago.
I think your visit was too short (three days is simply not enough) and there may be more needed research before you can definitively write Colorado off your list. But as has been said, there are many other mountainous areas in the USA to explore.

Thanks so much for starting this thread, it's been very helpful.
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Old 01-21-2016, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,227 posts, read 24,308,543 times
Reputation: 12942
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shellybug View Post
I am most definitely checking these out! Thank you so much!
I was going to recommend Coeur d'Alene/Spokane too. My version of heaven.

We could just as easily recommend every city along I-5 between Bellingham, WA and Redding, CA too.
List here:
Spoiler

Washington:
Bellingham
Mt Vernon/Burlington
Everett
Seattle/metro
Tacoma
Olympia
Centralia/Chehalis
Longview/Kelso
Vancouver

Oregon:
Portland
Salem
Albany/Corvallis
Eugene
Roseburg
Grants Pass
Medford/Ashland

California:
Redding
Chico
Eureka (not on I-5, but on the coast)
__________________
Moderator for Los Angeles, The Inland Empire, and the Washington state forums.
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Old 01-21-2016, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
199 posts, read 179,595 times
Reputation: 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
Virtually all western cities are near some sort of mountains. Maybe these ones weren't for you.

Knowing a little more about what exactly you're looking for in your prospective place to live would help us narrow it down a bit more I think.
I feel a little arrogant mapping out the "perfect place", but if I had the option of my own Utopia, it would most likely be the following:

Varied geography: Mountains, lakes, rivers, streams, green forests, gigantic trees, red rocks, canyons (lots of wildlife as well)

Weather: All four seasons (or at least close to it) with a mild winter, but still light fluffy snow. No bitter, gut-wrenching cold. I actually love rain and thunderstorms (alot), but wouldn't want to live in a constant overcast cloud. I also really like sunshiny days.

People: I love all kinds of people. I really like diversity. People who are open-minded, accepting, and friendly. Salt-of-the-earth, hard-working people are pretty awesome! But so are white-collar professionals. I really love people of all shapes, sizes, persuasions, beliefs, and so on. Even the grumpy ones ! I just can't do a place not tolerant of giving people their space to do as they please and aren't respectful of letting others be. I need a dogma-free zone.

Amenities: I would like to have a place where I feel like I am in the middle of nowhere, but really have a modern shopping center around the corner. I definitely need a Whole Foods because I eat weird and they have weird stuff that most of the local grocers do not (mostly vegan donuts...I need vegan donuts) . Access to lots of outdoor activities, festivals, farmer's markets, museums, history, theater (all within an hour drive would be fine). Within an hour or two of a major airport. Close proximity to travel the eastern U.S. as I haven't seen any of it yet. I really love, love Zion National Park's photos. It looks incredible, but so does the Redwood forest.

Housing/ Atmosphere: I don't want to live in a place that is full of stressed-out people climbing over one another to "success". I'm a teacher. I'll never get rich, but I really love my job and love that I work hard, but I'm not working myself to death. Despite what you might hear about teaching, I feel like it offers an incredible quality of life. We are more about quality versus quantity. If the community is progressive in regard to environmental factors, even better. Affordable living (12-15% of income). My ideal home is a 900 sq-foot eco cottage with homage to Frank Lloyd Wright architecture.

Okay...CUE THE LAUGHTER.
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Old 01-21-2016, 05:06 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,942 posts, read 20,184,988 times
Reputation: 22564
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shellybug View Post
I feel a little arrogant mapping out the "perfect place", but if I had the option of my own Utopia, it would most likely be the following:[/b]
Switzerland. Near the Italian border.
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Old 01-21-2016, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
199 posts, read 179,595 times
Reputation: 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Switzerland. Near the Italian border.
If only, Mr. Davebarnes, if only...
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Old 01-21-2016, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
199 posts, read 179,595 times
Reputation: 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunderpig2 View Post
Are mountains the main draw? Other states have mountains *and* more vegetation, density/variation of trees, and shades of green. I've been all around CO, and it all looks dry and faded. If your eyes and mind are used to lots of green (and in this case, it has been your entire life, and most of mine too), there's no way to force them to act/respond differently. It's deep down, connecting the senses, the mind, the soul.

It's been interesting learning all of this first-hand, and going from nearly sea-level tropical to three years plus of very dry and an altitude of 5000'. But even disappointments with the scenery and environment have taken a backseat to larger issues.

Oregon, for one, has much more green and more variety, and has utterly beautiful areas that can't be rivaled in CO. Every time I visit there, it's like "Wow!" The Willamette Valley is dense with color, and the air is rich and arromatic. Nature is fully alive, and not just for a few months, but all year. OR has the coast, the wetter/greener areas, and the drier eastern portion. Bend is a mountainous city. There are lots of places in the middle of the two large zones, where one could possibly find the right balance of scenery and moisture.
We have strongly considered Oregon. Honestly, I considered it because I really, really love greenery (says the girl who has wanted to move to a high-plains desert), but does it get bitterly cold there? I love rain quite a bit, so that isn't a concern. I'm just afraid of places where there is never sun or the winters are so cold I can't breathe .
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Old 01-21-2016, 05:46 PM
 
1,822 posts, read 1,389,155 times
Reputation: 2087
I've seen it in the -10s (negative teens) here, and although very close to the foothills, I'm not in the mountains (where the temps would plummet much lower).

Family that live in OR say it rarely goes below the 30s, and even those temperatures are not common. They definitely would not live in a "bitterly cold" area, and I know they love OR. They are also from the Gulf Coast.

"Bitterly cold" sounds more like Minnesota, and the northeast.

If you love rain, then that would be another strike against CO. I rarely ever rains here! I see maybe only 5-8 times a year on average. It's often rather measly, with maybe only one or two good soakings per year. This year was better than normal, but a few years ago were several drought years in a row. Browns taken to a deeper level. So your glimpse of winter here was after a rainier year, believe it or not. LOL

Last edited by Sunderpig2; 01-21-2016 at 06:15 PM..
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