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Old 05-14-2016, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
1,448 posts, read 2,355,378 times
Reputation: 1775

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I often wonder whether the desire to move to (or stay in Colorado) would abate to some extent if water was more extensive and/or irrigtated turf was banned or substantially restricted. I've met an inordinate amount of Coloradans in my decades here who don't like dry landscapes and only recreate in the mountains.

 
Old 05-14-2016, 11:59 AM
 
1,246 posts, read 919,200 times
Reputation: 1433
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW Crow View Post
Diversions of water previously available or used in agriculture are what has been done for about 150 years on the front range. I have the impression that that the municipal water takers feel pretty confident they will be able to meet the urban demands for water in most places thru 2040 or 2050. Maybe it gets a lot tougher later but I doubt front range growth in general falls short of projections due to inadequate water before 2040 or 2050. There is so much water currently used by ag that can and probably will eventually get bought up. Conservation gains are also still quite possible and likely. But further climate change might make things tougher or a lot tougher. Even then I'd still bet that a large share of the growth still happens, just forcing some further buys and conservation measures. Front lawns may go before the houses and the people in them stop being added.
Yeah I read like 95% of all water in CA and CO goes to agriculture...something like 3% of the population.

So we are making the vast majority of the population pay for subsidized farming to grow crops in a desert to artificially support a population that isn't sustainable.....brilliant!
 
Old 05-14-2016, 12:51 PM
 
20,840 posts, read 39,052,603 times
Reputation: 19074
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy87 View Post
Yeah I read like 95% of all water in CA and CO goes to agriculture...something like 3% of the population.

So we are making the vast majority of the population pay for subsidized farming to grow crops in a desert to artificially support a population that isn't sustainable.....brilliant!
Over the years in these forums I've quoted some state of COLO figures that 90% of the water that is used in COLO is used for Ag, and 10% is for homeowner use. Note that I said "of the water that is used in COLO" as there is a lot of water that falls here but is NOT used here, it simply runs out via the river systems to other states for their use.

Water is a major issue here, and will be going forward.

This is not a very good thread, since there is no stated "capacity" for Colorado. We are not only limited by water but by many other factors like jobs, schools, roads, and of course the sheer lunacy of TABOR which limits the state from fulfilling valid obligations to the populace. etc.
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Last edited by Mike from back east; 05-14-2016 at 01:07 PM..
 
Old 05-14-2016, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,324 posts, read 1,787,341 times
Reputation: 3284
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Over the years in these forums I've quoted some state of COLO figures that 90% of the water that is used in COLO is used for Ag, and 10% is for homeowner use. Note that I said "of the water that is used in COLO" as there is a lot of water that falls here but is NOT used here, it simply runs out via the river systems to other states for their use.

Water is a major issue here, and will be going forward.

This is not a very good thread, since there is no stated "capacity" for Colorado. We are not only limited by water but by many other factors like jobs, schools, roads, and of course the sheer lunacy of TABOR which limits the state from fulfilling valid obligations to the populace. etc.
TABOR really is handicapping the state in its ability to move forward on infrastructure projects it needs to be repealed.
 
Old 05-14-2016, 05:49 PM
 
147 posts, read 187,643 times
Reputation: 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar
Now if only we could make water out of wine....


Quote:
Originally Posted by suzco View Post
or better yet, out of beer.
We make water out of beer and wine all the time. Just have to filter it through our kidneys first.
 
Old 05-15-2016, 01:05 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,227 posts, read 24,316,643 times
Reputation: 12943
Quote:
Originally Posted by freewest View Post
We make water out of beer and wine all the time. Just have to filter it through our kidneys first.
You might be on to something there....
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Old 05-15-2016, 07:13 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,401 posts, read 39,713,740 times
Reputation: 23426
Wine has been cheaper than water for 8 centuries in parts of Spain.

We can watch what is happening to CA ag. Foretelling of Colorado changes.

The politico will just encourage less water to US ag, to stimulate USA chemical use on foreign AG products that find their way to the food stream in USA. It works out pefect for the failed USA healthcare system. More peopleneeding more medical care id good business to over priced USA healthcare. Keeps the economy rolling in dough... Your dough. Thanks for your contribution.

BTW: Recycled toilet water is used in many places around the world for food production.

The beverage industries use a lot of water to make unhealthy drinks.
 
Old 05-15-2016, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,324 posts, read 1,787,341 times
Reputation: 3284
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Wine has been cheaper than water for 8 centuries in parts of Spain.

We can watch what is happening to CA ag. Foretelling of Colorado changes.

The politico will just encourage less water to US ag, to stimulate USA chemical use on foreign AG products that find their way to the food stream in USA. It works out pefect for the failed USA healthcare system. More peopleneeding more medical care id good business to over priced USA healthcare. Keeps the economy rolling in dough... Your dough. Thanks for your contribution.

BTW: Recycled toilet water is used in many places around the world for food production.

The beverage industries use a lot of water to make unhealthy drinks.
I think the real elephant in the room is we are just overpopulated.
 
Old 05-15-2016, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,049 posts, read 2,077,790 times
Reputation: 3536
Well, flooding on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers seems to be an almost regular occurrence. Its 600 miles to the Missouri River. Perhaps a pipeline to Denver is in order.
 
Old 05-24-2016, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Hays, Kansas
723 posts, read 901,123 times
Reputation: 677
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
I have read several of the posts above with great interest and some with great horror when I imagined Colorado with a population the size some of you have postulated. But Colorado is not Iowa where one of our faithful posters has assured us it rains 16 months at a time. Colorado and the rest of the West is not getting even the amount of precipitation and the cooler temperatures it once enjoyed. Economists and demographers MUST take this in mind when estimating population changes everywhere, not just in Colorado.

People, people, people - what part of "water" don't you understand? H2O - two molecules of hydrogen and one of oxygen. Man can create water in the science lab, but otherwise, water is a finite substance. Use it all up and there are not a bunch of hydrogen and oxygen atoms somewhere, leering at one another and getting ready to create little baby water drops.

Right now Lake Powell is only 42% full - the lowest it has ever been. Despite the fact that Colorado and other Western States had good snow pack this winter (for a change), the flow of the Colorado River right now is estimated by some at only 87% of normal. Why should we care about Lake Powell or Lake Mead which exists mainly to bring joy to the hearts of the gamblers in the casinos of Las Vegas, swimming pools to Phoenix and, water for rice farms in California? Because Colorado is one of the 4 "upper basin" - that's Colorado River Basin, BTW. As such, Colorado and the others must ensure that Lake Mead gets a certain amount of water (OUR water) each year. This water from the Upper Basin States is collected by the Glen Canyon Dam, and we must release water from Lake Powell/Glen Canyon if Mead calls for it even if we don't have enough water ourselves.

In 1996 23 million people were dependent upon the Colorado. By 2020 - a mere 4 years from now - 38 million will depend upon the Colorado. Now what will happen if climate change continues to proceed at its current pace, no matter how many people keep their eyes tightly shut, their fingers in their ears, and sing "la-la-la" as loud as they can? At the very least, a few will have to climb out of the pool since the pool is going to be dry. And just how well will the people and politicians in Denver re-act if Phoenix demands that we drain Glen Canyon as they have the perfect right to do under the Colorado River Compact? If it were me up here in Colorado facing such an arrogant demand by the people of Phoenix, I'd dust off my old Ed Abbey books, find me some like-minded friends, and if we had to, I'd help blow up a structure here and there to ensure that that Colorado's water stays right here where it belongs. And I'm only a mild mannered, retired librarian...

Needless to say, I was just having some fun in the paragraph above, and I do NOT advocate blowing up ANYTHING (except Washington DC, of course). But consider what will happen if the Lower Basin States call in their cards due to drought (gee, what drought?), and according to the Law of the River, many water projects in the state of Colorado will be adversely impacted, to put it mildly. For example, diversions from the Colorado-Big Thompson Project to Front Range cities like Denver and Colorado Springs would drop from 500,000 acre feet to 70,000. Even a far less dramatic drop would still have an adverse impact on Colorado's growth. Colorado's boosters, real estate agents and economists need to get out of the meeting rooms and up into the mountains to start counting stands of trees dead from drought and the explosion of pine beetles nutured as never before by our increasingly warm winters.

If you have half a brain and you love Colorado and want to see it grow, go for some long hikes in the mountains and look, really LOOK around you. And we have not even begun to address the problem. I hope the millenials wake up soon.


POWELL CONTINUES TO EVAPORATE


Colorado has never cared about letting Kansas and Nebraska get their fair share of the Republican and Arkansas Rivers . The vast majority of the students I've met from Colorado had never heard about the water battles, but they all shared the same opinion of "well, it flows out of OUR mountains so all of the water should belong to us." They also won't acknowledge the pine beetles or anything else.
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