U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-02-2016, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,905 posts, read 6,501,326 times
Reputation: 7355

Advertisements

1 out of 5 Coloradans are obese and that's enough to be best in the country. 36% obese in Louisiana was the worst.

Colorado also has the lowest diabetes rate in the country, best for physical activity, and 2nd lowest hypertension rate.

The State of Obesity 2016 - Trust for America's Health

Full report: http://healthyamericans.org/assets/f...port-FINAL.pdf
Quote:
Report Finds Colorado's Obesity Rate is 20.2 Percent, the Lowest Rate

Rates Decreased in Four States: Minnesota, Montana, New York and Ohio

Washington, D.C., September 1, 2016 — The adult obesity rate in Colorado is 20.2 percent, giving them the lowest rate, according to The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America, a report from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

U.S. adult obesity rates decreased in four states (Minnesota, Montana, New York and Ohio), increased in two (Kansas and Kentucky) and remained stable in the rest, between 2014 and 2015. This marks the first time in the past decade that any states have experienced decreases - aside from a decline in Washington, D.C. in 2010.

Despite these modest gains, obesity continued to put millions of Americans at increased risk for a range of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease, and costs the country between $147 billion and $210 billion each year.

In 2015, Louisiana has the highest adult obesity rate at 36.2 percent and Colorado has the lowest at 20.2 percent. While rates remained steady for most states, they are still high across the board. The 13th annual report found that rates of obesity now exceed 35 percent in four states, are at or above 30 percent in 25 states and are above 20 percent in all states. In 1991, no state had a rate above 20 percent. The analyses are based on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

The State of Obesity also found that:

9 of the 11 states with the highest obesity rates are in the South and 22 of the 25 states with the highest rates of obesity are in the South and Midwest.

10 of the 12 states with the highest rates of diabetes are in the South-and rates of diabetes increased in three states (Louisiana, Mississippi and Oregon). Colorado's diabetes rate is 6.8 percent, the lowest rate.

American Indian/Alaska Natives have an adult obesity rate of 42.3 percent.

Adult obesity rates for Blacks are 27.7 percent in Colorado, the third lowest rate, and at or above 40 percent for Blacks in 14 states.

Adult obesity rates for Latinos are 28.3 percent in Colorado, the 34th highest rate.

Adult obesity rates for Whites are 19.1 percent in Colorado, the third lowest rate, and at or above 25 percent for Whites in 39 states.

Nationally, adult obesity rates are at or above 30 percent in: 40 states and Washington, D.C. for Blacks; 29 states for Latinos; and 16 states for Whites.

There is some evidence that the rate of increase has been slowing over the past decade. For instance, in 2005, 49 states experienced an increase; in 2008, 37 states did; in 2010, 28 states did; in 2011, 16 states did; in 2012, only one state did; and in 2014, only two states did. (Note: the methodology for BRFSS changed in 2011).

"Obesity remains one of the most significant epidemics our country has faced, contributing to millions of preventable illnesses and billions of dollars in avoidable healthcare costs," said Richard Hamburg, interim president and CEO, TFAH. "These new data suggest that we are making some progress but there's more yet to do. Across the country, we need to fully adopt the high-impact strategies recommended by numerous experts. Improving nutrition and increasing activity in early childhood, making healthy choices easier in people's daily lives and targeting the startling inequities are all key approaches we need to ramp up."

Some other key findings from the report include:

The number of high school students who drink one or more soda a day has dropped by nearly 40 percent since 2007, to around one in five (20.4 percent) in 2015 (note: does not include sport/energy drinks, diet sodas, or water with added sugars). There was no data for Colorado on this indicator.

The number of high school students who report playing video or computer games three or more hours a day has increased more than 88 percent since 2003 (from 22.1 to 41.7 percent). There was no data for Colorado on this indicator.

More than 29 million children live in "food deserts," and more than 15 million U.S. children-including 13.6 percent in Colorado-live in "food-insecure" households - having limited access to adequate food and nutrition due to cost, proximity and/or other reasons.

The federal government has awarded more than $90 million via 44 Healthy Food Financing Initiative financial assistance awards in 29 states, not including Colorado, since 2011 - helping leverage more than $1 billion and create 2,500 jobs.

18 states, not including Colorado, and Washington, D.C. set a minimum amount of time that elementary students must participate in physical education; 14 states, not including Colorado, and Washington, D.C. set a minimum amount for middle schools; and six states, not including Colorado, set a minimum amount for high schools.
The report also includes a set of priority policy recommendations to accelerate progress in addressing obesity:

Invest in Obesity Prevention: Providing adequate funding for the Prevention and Public Health Fund and for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion/Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity would increase support to state and local health departments.

Focus on Early Childhood Policies and Programs: Supporting better health among young children through healthier meals, physical activity, limiting screen time and connecting families to community services through Head Start; prioritizing early childhood education opportunities under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA); and implementing the updated nutrition standards covering the Child and Adult Care Food Program.

School-Based Policies and Programs: Continuing implementation of the final "Smart Snacks" rule for improved nutrition for snacks and beverages sold in schools; eliminating in-school marketing of foods that do not meet Smart Snacks nutrition standards; and leveraging opportunities to support health, physical education and activity under ESSA.

Community-Based Policies and Programs: Prioritizing health in transportation planning to help communities ensure residents have access to walking, biking, and other forms of active transportation and promoting innovative strategies, such as tax credits, zoning incentives, grants, low-interest loans and public-private partnerships to increase access to healthy, affordable foods.

Health, Healthcare and Obesity: Covering the full range of obesity prevention, treatment and management services under all public and private health plans, including nutrition counseling, medications and behavioral health consultation, along with encouraging an uptake in services for all eligible beneficiaries.
"This year's State of Obesity report is an urgent call to action for government, industry, healthcare, schools, child care and families around the country to join in the effort to provide a brighter, healthier future for our children. It focuses on important lessons and signs of progress, but those efforts must be significantly scaled to see a bigger turn around," said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of RWJF. "Together, we can build an inclusive Culture of Health and ensure that all children and families live healthy lives."

The State of Obesity report (formerly known as F as in Fat), with state rankings and interactive maps, charts and graphs, is available at The State of Obesity: Obesity data trends and policy analysis. Follow the conversation at #StateofObesity.

2015 STATE-BY-STATE ADULT OBESITY RATES

Based on an analysis of new state-by-state data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, adult obesity rates by state from highest to lowest were:

Note: 1 = Highest rate of adult obesity, 51 = lowest rate of adult obesity.

1. Louisiana (36.2); 2. (tie) Alabama (35.6), Mississippi (35.6) and West Virginia (35.6); 5. Kentucky (34.6); 6. Arkansas (34.5); 7. Kansas (34.2); 8. Oklahoma (33.9); 9. Tennessee (33.8); 10. (tie) Missouri (32.4) and Texas (32.4); 12. Iowa (32.1); 13. South Carolina (31.7); 14. Nebraska (31.4); 15. Indiana (31.3); 16. Michigan (31.2); 17. North Dakota (31.0); 18. Illinois (30.8); 19. (tie) Georgia (30.7) and Wisconsin (30.7); 21. South Dakota (30.4); 22. (tie) North Carolina (30.1) and Oregon (30.1); 24. (tie) Maine (30.0) and Pennsylvania (30.0); 26. (tie) Alaska (29.8) and Ohio (29.8); 28. Delaware (29.7); 29. Virginia (29.2); 30. Wyoming (29.0); 31. Maryland (28.9); 32. New Mexico (28.8); 33. Idaho (28.6); 34. Arizona (28.4); 35. Florida (26.8); 36. Nevada (26.7); 37. Washington (26.4); 38. New Hampshire (26.3); 39. Minnesota (26.1); 40. Rhode Island (26.0); 41. New Jersey (25.6); 42. Connecticut (25.3); 43. Vermont (25.1); 44. New York (25.0); 45. Utah (24.5); 46. Massachusetts (24.3); 47. California (24.2); 48. Montana (23.6); 49. Hawaii (22.7); 50. District of Columbia (22.1); 51. Colorado (20.2).

Last edited by SkyDog77; 09-02-2016 at 10:47 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-02-2016, 09:43 AM
 
1,246 posts, read 919,712 times
Reputation: 1433
I travel a lot for work and airports are good indicators of how the population is. Its amazing how much difference there are in certain areas. Denver, SLC, and Seattle are the most fit I go to on a regular basis. Houston....different story.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2016, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,905 posts, read 6,501,326 times
Reputation: 7355
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy87 View Post
I travel a lot for work and airports are good indicators of how the population is. Its amazing how much difference there are in certain areas. Denver, SLC, and Seattle are the most fit I go to on a regular basis. Houston....different story.
Yeah. Texas is 10th worst out of 51.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2016, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Coastal North Carolina
156 posts, read 123,908 times
Reputation: 300
Thanks for the link to this report.

Truly sad what a bloated, unhealthy nation we have become when 20%(!) obesity earns the 'skinniest' award.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2016, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,530 posts, read 10,200,595 times
Reputation: 9757
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
Yeah. Texas is 10th worst out of 51.
If you really wanna get their dander up go post this in the Dallas forum. There's one guy in there who'll totally lose his s*&t.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2016, 10:12 AM
SQL
 
Location: The State of Delusion - Colorado
1,337 posts, read 842,694 times
Reputation: 1492
I remember going to Pennsylvania (just outside of Philly) a few years ago to meet up with this chick I was thinking about dating. We were at an outdoor festival, and I remember thinking to myself how fat everyone appeared. Even growing up in Metro Detroit, I noticed a stark contrast between the fitness levels of people there than here in Denver. And it's not necessarily a climate thing that limits people's ability to be healthy. Heck, if they can be fit in Minneapolis, they should be able to do it anywhere.

It seems like areas that tend to attract young professionals tend to have some of the fitter populations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2016, 10:16 AM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,950 posts, read 20,207,715 times
Reputation: 22581
What will be the impact of "Taco Trucks on Every Corner"?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2016, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,796 posts, read 4,901,271 times
Reputation: 17161
Shivering burns fat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2016, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,905 posts, read 6,501,326 times
Reputation: 7355
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrighterDays View Post
Thanks for the link to this report.

Truly sad what a bloated, unhealthy nation we have become when 20%(!) obesity earns the 'skinniest' award.
Agree

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
If you really wanna get their dander up go post this in the Dallas forum. There's one guy in there who'll totally lose his s*&t.
While that sounds like a ton of fun, I'll leave the trolling to someone else. Please do send me a link if he does get to reading this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SQL View Post
I remember going to Pennsylvania (just outside of Philly) a few years ago to meet up with this chick I was thinking about dating. We were at an outdoor festival, and I remember thinking to myself how fat everyone appeared. Even growing up in Metro Detroit, I noticed a stark contrast between the fitness levels of people there than here in Denver. And it's not necessarily a climate thing that limits people's ability to be healthy. Heck, if they can be fit in Minneapolis, they should be able to do it anywhere.

It seems like areas that tend to attract young professionals tend to have some of the fitter populations.
Yep. MN is ranks pretty well in every category.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
What will be the impact of "Taco Trucks on Every Corner"?
It will make America great again.

Are Tacos a Good Diet Food? | Healthy Eating | SF Gate
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2016, 10:36 AM
 
1,246 posts, read 919,712 times
Reputation: 1433
Quote:
Originally Posted by SQL View Post
I remember going to Pennsylvania (just outside of Philly) a few years ago to meet up with this chick I was thinking about dating. We were at an outdoor festival, and I remember thinking to myself how fat everyone appeared. Even growing up in Metro Detroit, I noticed a stark contrast between the fitness levels of people there than here in Denver. And it's not necessarily a climate thing that limits people's ability to be healthy. Heck, if they can be fit in Minneapolis, they should be able to do it anywhere.

It seems like areas that tend to attract young professionals tend to have some of the fitter populations.
Yeah Philly is a fat city. I think a lot has to do with parks and rec opportunities. Not much in TX cities or Philly to do outside and cities that are sprawled out your free time to work out is limited. Ive noticed some people in certain areas have a "proud" fat like its earned or something.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:10 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top