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Old 09-08-2016, 11:09 AM
 
1,822 posts, read 1,390,065 times
Reputation: 2087

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Quote:
Originally Posted by auburnc View Post
Hello,
I'm a 22 year old girl and recent college grad from Alabama. I'm looking for a drastic change of scenery and I've always been drawn to Colorado.
In my research I've found that Denver is a good place to for young professionals, that there's a lot of job opportunity and a lot to do there.
So basically, sell me on Colorado: why should someone like me move there? or should I not?
I won't sell you on CO. I'm familiar with Alabama, and I think you'll have issues with culture and mindset here. You might miss the beautiful lush green beauty there while in the midst of the dry and often sparse environment here. You might hate the long and cold winters. You mentioned Denver, but it has a certain hip, modern, urban appeal that you might not connect with. Even though you're looking for a drastic change in scenery (I felt that too, and acted on it, to my ultimate disappointment), you might end up missing family, friends, and familiarity. If you are used to more affordable areas, it gets old shelling out extra money for almost everything. I personally don't see the higher cost as worth it.

Keep in mind that recommendations and suggestions from people who have lived in CO (and this region) most or all of their lives will see this area different than someone would coming from your location or area. You really need to tune in to comments from those who have done a similar relocation. Listen to those from the south in general, and states like AL and TN in particular.

Big change isn't always good (been there, done that). I was drawn to CO too, and previously spent much time on vacation in this state. Living here is a completely different story, and a different reality. That's good though that you are seeking pro and con comments from people. Many just want to hear positive statements, and possibly sugar-coating. Maybe you can find the best of both worlds; getting your big change while also remaining in familiar territory (that doesn't seem weird and alien at times).

Last edited by Sunderpig2; 09-08-2016 at 11:32 AM..
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Old 09-08-2016, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
135 posts, read 113,101 times
Reputation: 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by auburnc View Post
Hello,
I'm a 22 year old girl and recent college grad from Alabama. I'm looking for a drastic change of scenery and I've always been drawn to Colorado.
In my research I've found that Denver is a good place to for young professionals, that there's a lot of job opportunity and a lot to do there.
So basically, sell me on Colorado: why should someone like me move there? or should I not?
yeah, Im not going to 'sell' anything for you. If you really like it, come out here and check it out. Then you can decide if you like it or not.
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Old 09-08-2016, 12:17 PM
 
125 posts, read 104,684 times
Reputation: 304
I'm surprised nobody's mentioned it, but if you think you are going to have a new home deep in the rockies, you are wrong. Denver is something like 30-45 minutes away from the rocky mountains, east of the rockies. Outside of Denver is very flat and brown, it's almost a desert terrain. Mostly dirt, and some little shrubs here and there. The pictures of Denver that you see on TV and on postcards is extremely misleading, those mountains are really not that close to Denver at all. It's not pretty at all (not for me, someone who grew up in the Michigan wilderness.) If you want to feel like you are living in the mountains, Colorado Springs would be a much better bet and much prettier.

It might be worth noting that the last time I drove through Denver on I-25, it stunk, literally, and seemed to have a visual layer of smog. Colorado Springs didn't have that issue.
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Old 09-08-2016, 12:56 PM
 
269 posts, read 228,955 times
Reputation: 408
C/S is about 1000' higher than Denver so we do not need smog checks on our cars either.
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Old 09-08-2016, 02:15 PM
 
3,797 posts, read 3,987,784 times
Reputation: 2566
If a person moves to front range and ends up averaging maybe 6 mountain day hikes, a couple ski days and maybe a mountain festival in a year (which is probably pretty common and there are probably a lot of people with less for various reasons), then they have picked home for a mountain activity level that that many people could equal on vacation time from lots of other places. If that is the level of use you want; that is fine, of course. If you pick Colorado for the scenery and the outdoor opportunities and as your home instead of vacation spot, a higher level of use, real use might make a stronger case for the choice but in the end it is an individual decision and the only standards are your own.

Last edited by NW Crow; 09-08-2016 at 02:33 PM..
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Old 09-08-2016, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
758 posts, read 581,635 times
Reputation: 1477
^ Totally agree. I see so many people moving here, dropping thousands of dollars on skis, backpacking gear, mtn bike, roof rake, kayak, etc...doing these things a couple times, getting over it, letting the gear collect dust, and then one day selling all of their stuff on craigslist.

The "pedestrian" level of hiking is fun for the first few months, but most people get over it quickly. But if you are the type that likes to get up at 2am to start 14ers at least once a week, then you would get a lot more out of living here.
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Old 09-08-2016, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Colorado
154 posts, read 98,904 times
Reputation: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Username00 View Post
I'm surprised nobody's mentioned it, but if you think you are going to have a new home deep in the rockies, you are wrong. Denver is something like 30-45 minutes away from the rocky mountains, east of the rockies. Outside of Denver is very flat and brown, it's almost a desert terrain. Mostly dirt, and some little shrubs here and there. The pictures of Denver that you see on TV and on postcards is extremely misleading, those mountains are really not that close to Denver at all. It's not pretty at all (not for me, someone who grew up in the Michigan wilderness.) If you want to feel like you are living in the mountains, Colorado Springs would be a much better bet and much prettier.

It might be worth noting that the last time I drove through Denver on I-25, it stunk, literally, and seemed to have a visual layer of smog. Colorado Springs didn't have that issue.
Denver's a big city if you include all the urban sprawl. I grew up on the east side (Aurora, you've all heard of it) and you're a good drive from the mountains there. Live in Arvada now (NW suburb) and can be at the mouth of Coal Creek Canyon in under 15 minutes. Denver "metro" includes a number of mountain communities, but Denver "proper" is like the hole in the middle of the doughnut.
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Old 09-08-2016, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Colorado
154 posts, read 98,904 times
Reputation: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW Crow View Post
If a person moves to front range and ends up averaging maybe 6 mountain day hikes, a couple ski days and maybe a mountain festival in a year (which is probably pretty common and there are probably a lot of people with less for various reasons), then they have picked home for a mountain activity level that that many people could equal on vacation time from lots of other places. If that is the level of use you want; that is fine, of course. If you pick Colorado for the scenery and the outdoor opportunities and as your home instead of vacation spot, a higher level of use, real use might make a stronger case for the choice but in the end it is an individual decision and the only standards are your own.
Keep in mind also that the Front Range is getting crowded. If your idea of recreation is weekend ski trips, plan on spending a lot of time idling on I-70 because the Sunday ski traffic into Denver from the mountains is horrendous. Places like Rocky Mountain National Park (3rd most popular park in the system & 2 hours from Denver) are now considering limiting vehicle traffic because it'd just gotten too crowded. Driving I-25 from about Colorado Springs to about Fort Collins on a GOOD day will likely give you PTSD if you've never done the high-speed shuffle (you LA folks will be fine).

Also, a lot of the "events" in Denver have gotten hard to get into for the same reason. Too popular, too many people. We've even given up mostly on the Renaissance Festival as too crowded to be fun any more.

That's my view as a weekender who has lived here all my life. Now that I'm retired, we'll try a lot of it again, but during the week.

My wife and I went out for a drive this morning through Golden Gate State Park, up to Nederland and back through Boulder and Eldorado Springs State Park. I was surprised to see the trailheads so full on a Thursday.
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Old 09-08-2016, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
758 posts, read 581,635 times
Reputation: 1477
^ I'm starting to realize that a lot of the trails crowds are tourists or visitors. Denver is now a major tourist destination, and a lot of visitors seem to stick to the front range trails closer to Denver.
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Old 09-08-2016, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Colorado
154 posts, read 98,904 times
Reputation: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
^ I'm starting to realize that a lot of the trails crowds are tourists or visitors. Denver is now a major tourist destination, and a lot of visitors seem to stick to the front range trails closer to Denver.
I need to pay closer attention to the license plates! I bet you're right, though. I've seen a lot more out-of-state plates the last couple years.
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