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Old 09-10-2016, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,904 posts, read 6,496,831 times
Reputation: 7353

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I too rarely see studs anymore. Every once in a while I hear them, but it's pretty rare. Most of the tire stores have gone away from pushing them.

I drove with studs on a rear wheel drive Volvo in the early 90s. There is nothing better on glare ice, but they are miserable in basically every other condition.

As sunspirit says, the new siliconized rubber compounds used on non studded winter tires have made them so good that I don't see the need for studs. If I lived in Silverton or Ouray, I would probably be temped to go with studs.

I do use winter tires on both my 4Runner and Land Cruiser. Winter tires are vastly superior to all seasons. I believe I having the right tool for the job.

As for comparing Minnesota to mountain driving, you're neglecting to understand the difference that steep hills make. Even so, I would put non studded snows on if I lived in Minneapolis.
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Old 09-11-2016, 12:32 AM
 
63 posts, read 64,417 times
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Maybe it's one out of 100 vehicles but I hear the tell-tale gritty, gravelly sound of studded tires even in the middle of summer. But then I'm in Cañon City, the home of us fossils. Potholes here are revered as a traffic-calming device on the cheap.
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Old 09-11-2016, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,049 posts, read 2,077,790 times
Reputation: 3536
Quote:
Originally Posted by iowegian3 View Post
Maybe it's one out of 100 vehicles but I hear the tell-tale gritty, gravelly sound of studded tires even in the middle of summer. But then I'm in Cañon City, the home of us fossils. Potholes here are revered as a traffic-calming device on the cheap.

Ahhh, there's our answer. I'd bet money that the tires you hear are also in the 20+ year range as well.
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Old 09-11-2016, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Colorado
154 posts, read 98,904 times
Reputation: 319
I learned to drive in the 'burbs of Denver in the early 70's. Do remember some folks running studded snow tires, but they were usually the people who frequented the mountains more. Chains for isolated snow events were more common. Someone here said that studs are good for glare ice and about nothing else. That's true. In a foot of powder or any real snow, you want chains, not studs. I recall "chaining up" the Maverick to take my brother on his paper route. There couldn't have been 15% of people using studs even then and almost all of them had a summer set of shoes. The weather here was never severe enough for full-time studs.

Gotta say, though. We bought a used "higher end" SUV a couple years ago that has all the traction stuff. Put some new Michelin's on it and have had the opportunity to test it in heavy snow.

Video here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iGW...ature=youtu.be

This is better than my 1999 4wd Blazer, and that was quite a bit better than a Maverick with chains.
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Old 09-11-2016, 07:52 PM
 
31 posts, read 20,487 times
Reputation: 45
Default Spiked

"Colorado = Missouri With Mountains, but with less common sense."

? Yikes. Not sure I follow the formula? (Since I am resident of both MO.and CO.)


Our Colorado residence is in mountains (10K) (snow and non paved roads) and I'm not sure I've ever noticed "studded tires" on a vehicle? I certainly don't have them on any of ours. For the truckers there are mandatory chain requirements(passes) depending but that the only comparative I can think of?


Forgive my ignorance but what is the "Missouri with mountains and less common sense" analogy? I could make all kinds of comments on that one
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Old 09-11-2016, 11:15 PM
 
63 posts, read 64,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mick968 View Post
"Colorado = Missouri With Mountains, but with less common sense."

? Yikes. Not sure I follow the formula? (Since I am resident of both MO.and CO.)


Our Colorado residence is in mountains (10K) (snow and non paved roads) and I'm not sure I've ever noticed "studded tires" on a vehicle? I certainly don't have them on any of ours. For the truckers there are mandatory chain requirements(passes) depending but that the only comparative I can think of?


Forgive my ignorance but what is the "Missouri with mountains and less common sense" analogy? I could make all kinds of comments on that one
It is a holistic impression I have of Colorado, having lived here over nine years, and having spent a year and a half in Missouri as a young man 30 years ago. I might expand on this idea at some point. Briefly (or not):

1. State DOT in both states are hamstrung by low gasoline taxes. Highway construction standards lag behind neighboring states.

2. Both states require increased or new taxes to be approved by the voters. A noble concept in theory, but in practice voters choose low taxes and consequently sub-par services.

3. It is easy in both states for the state constitution to be amended by voter initiative. The result is a constitution, at least in Colorado, that is a rambling wreck of a legal document.

4. There is a tendency for rural areas of both states to be rather run-down. It's tough to make a living in areas where agriculture is a tough go and mining/extraction industries can be rather volatile. (Mountain towns within at least an hour of a ski slope AREN'T rural. )

5. Minor sub-point to number 1 above: neither state DOT uses "NO PASSING ZONE" signs, although Weld County CO DOES use them on their county maintained highways. It is definitely more dangerous without them. (The "NO PASSING ZONE" sign was invented by the Iowa DOT in the late 1950s.)

Re: common sense, there's more of it in Missouri. I'd overall give Missouri a thumbs up for their support of higher education. It isn't as good as it used to be, but it's still better than Colorado...On marijuana, voters approved legislation that wasn't ready for prime-time. Potencies are all over the map, edibles had THC concentrations per serving that were way too high. Missouri would never be so quick out of the gate on an issue like marijuana...while the state DOTs aren't very strong, as an Iowan I appreciate the simple county blacktops of Missouri. Most Iowa counties over-engineered their county pavements forty and fifty years ago. There are many county highways in Iowa that are much better than most CO or MO state highways, which is rather ridiculous for podunk pavements that might only carry 400 or 500 vehicles daily....Towns like Aspen where there is a disconnect between the real estate market and the labor market, they just don't make sense, period. This is ground zero for the effluent affluent, as opposed to just the effluent effluent, the epicenter of which is sadly somewhere NW of Des Moines

If this post was a car, it would definitely be drifting all over the roadway.
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Old 09-12-2016, 01:59 PM
 
31 posts, read 20,487 times
Reputation: 45
Default Well done

Quote:
Originally Posted by iowegian3 View Post
It is a holistic impression I have of Colorado, having lived here over nine years, and having spent a year and a half in Missouri as a young man 30 years ago. I might expand on this idea at some point. Briefly (or not):

1. State DOT in both states are hamstrung by low gasoline taxes. Highway construction standards lag behind neighboring states.

2. Both states require increased or new taxes to be approved by the voters. A noble concept in theory, but in practice voters choose low taxes and consequently sub-par services.

3. It is easy in both states for the state constitution to be amended by voter initiative. The result is a constitution, at least in Colorado, that is a rambling wreck of a legal document.

4. There is a tendency for rural areas of both states to be rather run-down. It's tough to make a living in areas where agriculture is a tough go and mining/extraction industries can be rather volatile. (Mountain towns within at least an hour of a ski slope AREN'T rural. )

5. Minor sub-point to number 1 above: neither state DOT uses "NO PASSING ZONE" signs, although Weld County CO DOES use them on their county maintained highways. It is definitely more dangerous without them. (The "NO PASSING ZONE" sign was invented by the Iowa DOT in the late 1950s.)

Re: common sense, there's more of it in Missouri. I'd overall give Missouri a thumbs up for their support of higher education. It isn't as good as it used to be, but it's still better than Colorado...On marijuana, voters approved legislation that wasn't ready for prime-time. Potencies are all over the map, edibles had THC concentrations per serving that were way too high. Missouri would never be so quick out of the gate on an issue like marijuana...while the state DOTs aren't very strong, as an Iowan I appreciate the simple county blacktops of Missouri. Most Iowa counties over-engineered their county pavements forty and fifty years ago. There are many county highways in Iowa that are much better than most CO or MO state highways, which is rather ridiculous for podunk pavements that might only carry 400 or 500 vehicles daily....Towns
like Aspen where there is a disconnect between the real estate market and the labor market, they just don't make sense, period. This is ground zero for the effluent affluent, as opposed to just the effluent effluent, the epicenter of which is sadly somewhere NW of Des Moines

If this post was a car, it would definitely be drifting all over the roadway.

Nicely responded I love it (Colorado) for all the other reasons(mostly recreational) can't wait to spend more of my time there and not in (Missouri) (nothing personal against the state I have spent most of my life in)
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Old 09-12-2016, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,904 posts, read 6,496,831 times
Reputation: 7353
Quote:
Originally Posted by iowegian3 View Post
It is a holistic impression I have of Colorado, having lived here over nine years, and having spent a year and a half in Missouri as a young man 30 years ago. I might expand on this idea at some point. Briefly (or not):

1. State DOT in both states are hamstrung by low gasoline taxes. Highway construction standards lag behind neighboring states.

2. Both states require increased or new taxes to be approved by the voters. A noble concept in theory, but in practice voters choose low taxes and consequently sub-par services.

3. It is easy in both states for the state constitution to be amended by voter initiative. The result is a constitution, at least in Colorado, that is a rambling wreck of a legal document.

4. There is a tendency for rural areas of both states to be rather run-down. It's tough to make a living in areas where agriculture is a tough go and mining/extraction industries can be rather volatile. (Mountain towns within at least an hour of a ski slope AREN'T rural. )

5. Minor sub-point to number 1 above: neither state DOT uses "NO PASSING ZONE" signs, although Weld County CO DOES use them on their county maintained highways. It is definitely more dangerous without them. (The "NO PASSING ZONE" sign was invented by the Iowa DOT in the late 1950s.)

Re: common sense, there's more of it in Missouri. I'd overall give Missouri a thumbs up for their support of higher education. It isn't as good as it used to be, but it's still better than Colorado...On marijuana, voters approved legislation that wasn't ready for prime-time. Potencies are all over the map, edibles had THC concentrations per serving that were way too high. Missouri would never be so quick out of the gate on an issue like marijuana...while the state DOTs aren't very strong, as an Iowan I appreciate the simple county blacktops of Missouri. Most Iowa counties over-engineered their county pavements forty and fifty years ago. There are many county highways in Iowa that are much better than most CO or MO state highways, which is rather ridiculous for podunk pavements that might only carry 400 or 500 vehicles daily....Towns like Aspen where there is a disconnect between the real estate market and the labor market, they just don't make sense, period. This is ground zero for the effluent affluent, as opposed to just the effluent effluent, the epicenter of which is sadly somewhere NW of Des Moines

If this post was a car, it would definitely be drifting all over the roadway.
As a Colorado native who went to college in eastern Kansas and travels to St Louis every other month and Kansas City every quarter for business, i see more differences than similarities between Colorado and Missouri.

Missouri is a very Southern state in many ways. Colorado isn't remotely like this.

Culturally they could not be more different. The racial tension that exists in St Louis is simply at a different level than anything I've seen in Denver.

Denver does not have the ethnic diversity that STL does.

Politically, Colorado is much more liberal/libertarian than Missouri.

Neither KC or STL have the museums, theater, or cultural organizations that Denver does.

Recreationally, all I find in Missouri is that people want to go to "The Lake" in the summer and drink beer. There is very little winter recreation to speak of. People don't like to be outside in the winter.

Regarding the departments of transportation in each state, CDOT is being much more aggressive with Public Private Parnerships to fund road construction than MDOT.

Missouri lacks a world class tourist scene. Branson isn't Aspen or Vail.

Health wise, Missouri is obese on par with the south.
http://healthyamericans.org/reports/...php?stateid=MO

Last edited by SkyDog77; 09-12-2016 at 08:09 PM..
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Old 09-12-2016, 08:32 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,948 posts, read 20,196,196 times
Reputation: 22575
Studs go with tattoos.
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Old 09-13-2016, 09:29 PM
 
Location: The 719
14,498 posts, read 22,341,939 times
Reputation: 13809
How in the world did Missouri get brought up in this thread? I mean, we're talking about winter driving, then snow tires, then comparing Branson to Vail and Aspen?

Shoji Tabuchi would scream, "Show me!"

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