U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 06-05-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Cypress
4 posts, read 11,389 times
Reputation: 16

Advertisements

This is my first post EVER on a forum...But I need some advice/help as I've done so much research and information hunting my head is spinning. So bare with me it may be long, and I appreciate the time that is taken to read this post.

We currently live on the outskirts of Houston, TX, and have a child starting 4th grade.
I am currently 1 year into a 2 year Masters degree in Clincial mental health Counseling, after which I'll need a certain number of hours through internship before I become licensed (typically takes 18-24 months to complete depending on the state). We were thinking about moving after graduation and I would complete my internship hours in CO. Unfortunately, I don't have the luxury of having a list of PAID internship sites in CO like I do for here in Houston. But that's only part of the issue lol


What we are looking to move somewhere that is: (i go back and forth of the first two)
- within an hours drive of a Big city
- within a 30-45 min drive from a mid-size city and a hour to hour and a half drive to a big city

- I desperately want to wake up and see mountains (I know this may be difficult given that I also need to live somewhere and have a job lol)
- Safe & good schools
- Has jobs in the mental health field and energy/oil&gas (husband works oil&gas here, but has done just about everything)
- Close enough for a weekend hike
- 2+ acres

So our two options are
1. Find property within our parameters & build a house (or)
2. Buy a house in or around the city with no property and also purchase a weekend property within a 2 hour drive or the main house.

Option 1 is ideal, but we understand not always possible.

SO, to conclude this post...finally...I appreciate anyone who's stayed with it this long lol
So far, I've looked in Durango and Littleton.

Any particular city you recommend? I've heard people in CO are tired of us Texans moving to their state...but I promise, we are pretty low-key lol
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-05-2017, 09:54 AM
 
13,257 posts, read 25,400,293 times
Reputation: 20224
Durango is nowhere near a big city but I believe it has some mental health care beginning to happen. There are mental health centers is many towns, recently started, and they are hiring. There is relatively plenty in Grand Junction (the biggest city on the Western Slope) and there is an energy industry in GJ, although it has always tended to be a boom/bust kind of thing.

I work back East as a psychiatric RN and am retiring to the Western Slope next year, but did notice the job postings for new outpatient mental health centers (and I mean small centers) and they seem to be hiring people with specific credentialing on the master's level (and no RNs except advanced practice, which I am not). There are centers in the super expensive ski mountain town of Telluride, the less expensive gorgeous mountain town of Ridgway and then less less expensive town of Montrose (pop. about 30,000 and a half-hour drive to the big mountains and with a bit of a view).

I suggest you go to indeed.com and enter the name of a town or zip code and see what the jobs are. They seem to pay about $41k for the master's level. I believe they are state/federal funded.

You said nothing about your budget for housing and that would certainly help direct you. Best wishes.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2017, 09:56 AM
Status: "Celebrating 30 years as a Broker" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
10,873 posts, read 29,258,091 times
Reputation: 7074
call schools that offer your degree and ask if there are paid internships.

There is only one big city in Colorado, but there are plenty of cities that have mental health professional jobs.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2017, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Mars City
5,092 posts, read 2,084,744 times
Reputation: 7483
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAY004 View Post
What we are looking to move somewhere that is: (i go back and forth of the first two)
- within an hours drive of a Big city
- within a 30-45 min drive from a mid-size city and a hour to hour and a half drive to a big city

- I desperately want to wake up and see mountains (I know this may be difficult given that I also need to live somewhere and have a job lol)
- Has jobs in the mental health field and energy/oil&gas (husband works oil&gas here, but has done just about everything)
- 2+ acres

So our two options are
1. Find property within our parameters & build a house (or)
2. Buy a house in or around the city with no property and also purchase a weekend property within a 2 hour drive or the main house.
A lot of this sounds very familiar, especially where you come from and are wanting to move (CO), and importance of seeing the mountains, etc.

First off, though mountains might seem special now to you - since there aren't any where you are now - you shouldn't assume that they will be as powerful and special and change your life. Yeah, I found them special for about the first year, but after that, they're kind of still and boring (ha ha). I mean, when you've lived in a location with very dynamic weather and conditions (including the ever-changing coast, etc.) I think you'll find it too still and unchanging. And I'll bet money that you'll miss the large trees and dense wooded regions that you see in Cypress. The dryness here limits the types of trees and many shades of green that you are used to. It's more faded and sparse here. I've found the transition to be a lessening of nature rather than an increasing.

Nearly everything here will be more expensive. It's nice to think of getting 2+ acres, but it will be less practical here (more expensive, probably more remote, etc.) Water access and costs can be tricky in some areas due to the general dryness, as well as heavy water-rights restrictions.

Oil/gas will never be as big here as down there. Part of it is culture (anti-O&G and anti-fracking), and part of it is the whole landlocked factor (no water/port access).

You have to keep in mind other very big differences between the two states: reserved vs. welcoming towards transplants, income tax / no income tax, ease of traffic infrastructure expansion vs. not, cost of living, home prices, land costs, extreme weather differences, culture, etc.

I have to ask: why CO? Why not other areas/states? What are the truly compelling reasons why you're singling out this state? Are you sure you'll fit in with the way things are done here, and be better off / happier? How much have you visited this state and seen the area(s) up close? The last thing you want to do is armchair research and fill in the blanks with assumptions. Between being there and here, there is a very important step to fully explore first: that you haven't left out smarter matches and location options in other regions for both of you.

I am very familiar with where you live now, and 5 years of contrasted living in northern Colorado. Personal message me for more details.

Last edited by Thoreau424; 06-05-2017 at 11:10 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2017, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Cypress
4 posts, read 11,389 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
A lot of this sounds very familiar, especially where you come from and are wanting to move (CO), and importance of seeing the mountains, etc.

First off, though mountains might seem special now to you - since there aren't any where you are now - you shouldn't assume that they will be as powerful and special and change your life. Yeah, I found them special for about the first year, but after that, they're kind of still and boring (ha ha). I mean, when you've lived in a location with very dynamic weather and conditions (including the ever-changing coast, etc.) everything here is still and unchanging. And I'll bet money that you'll miss the large trees and dense wooded regions that you see in Cypress. The dryness here limits the types of trees and many shades of green that you are used to. It's more faded and sparse here. I've found the transition to be a lessing of nature rather than an increasing.

Nearly everything here will be more expensive. It's nice to think of getting 2+ acres, but it will be less practical here (more expensive, more remote, etc.) Water access and costs can be tricky due to dryness, as well as heavy water-rights restrictions.

Oil/gas will never be as big here as down there. Part of it is culture (anti-O&G and anti-fracking), and part of it is the whole landlocked factor (no water/port access).

You have to keep in mind other very big differences between the two states: reserved vs. welcoming towards transplants, income tax / no income tax, ease of traffic infrastructure expansion vs. not, cost of living, home prices, land costs, extreme weather differences, culture, etc.

I have to ask: why CO? Why not other areas/states? What are the truly compelling reasons why you're singling out this state? Are you sure you'll fit in with the way things are done here, and be better off / happier? How much have you visited this state and seen the area(s) up close? The last thing you want to do is armchair research and fill in the blanks with assumptions. Between being there and here, there is a very important step to fully explore first: that you haven't left out smarter matches / location options for both of you in other regions.

I am very familiar with where you live now, and 5 years of contrasted living in northern Colorado. Personal message me for more details.

Why CO? Last summer was one of Houstons hottests. The main reasons we have decided to move is the weather and the wanting for more space (I.e. Land) my husbands a rural area kind of guy and the city here is just getting to be too much for him. We get that in order for us to work and sustain life somewhere else we can't be completely remote, but even the nearest "rural" area here is growing and there's really no where to escape it...the dense populations of trees has decreased drastically in our area so I'm not so much bothered by that. We started looking in those areas here then a year later they've boomed.

We plan to take a trip to CO, we've never been...so I was hoping for some suggestions on where to start. Because right now, all I know is texas.
Btw, I'm sure my appreciation for the mountains will change over time. We've looked into New Mexico, South Dakota (just begun research), Arkansas and even further up north of Texas.

I should also mention, I have considered pursuing my PhD later, if I've got it in me...I've been in school for so long it's hard to make decisions like that right now. However, that will mean I'll need to locate somewhere where that's possible. So that should help narrow my search. As far as my husband and the oil &a gas, she's been looking to get out of it for a while now and like I said he has an abundance of experience in other areas he's looking into.

Although we'd love to see what CO has to offer, we are still searching.

Last edited by Mike from back east; 06-05-2017 at 11:27 AM.. Reason: Merged 2:1
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2017, 11:49 AM
 
20 posts, read 19,094 times
Reputation: 70
Here are some thoughts to get you started even though you don't know many details yet:

To be an hour from a big city (Denver or Colorado Springs) puts you somewhere in the Front Range (I25 corridor). In CO vs Houston there's a sharper demarcation between urban areas and "country". Depending which direction you go an hour may put you in the middle of nowhere. An hour from Houston still has a lot of towns nearby (think Hempstead or Sealy).

If your husband is in oil & gas jobs are most likely in Denver (if in an office) or northern CO closer to WY if working in the field.

You might check out the area between Denver and Colorado Springs (like Castle Rock) which would give access to jobs in either city while still being in the country.

Being able to see the mountains doesn't get old.

If you don't need to be an hour from a big city that opens up more possibilities.


Good luck.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2017, 07:18 PM
 
825 posts, read 1,597,656 times
Reputation: 1239
If you have never been to Colorado, the first visit needs to be to the front range: Ft. Collins south to Pueblo. Your priority needs to be on the Denver to Colorado Springs portion with further exploration north and south as time permits. Durango is a great place, but it does not seem to fit your requirements.

There are many places scattered around that might work very well for you, and a great many that would be a poor fit. You really are going to have to determine where the jobs are first.

Frontier is offering weekend Houston-Denver flights for as little as $150. I'd book some.

If you literally need to "see mountains" you have a lot of shopping to do. You cannot even narrow it down to a community. Views vary by street and even specific lot. There is a lot to be said for living where you need to be and going to a mountain location when convenient. Work commutes are every day, after all.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2017, 07:48 PM
 
Location: On the sunny side of a mountain
3,174 posts, read 6,997,354 times
Reputation: 6498
The former Lodge and Spa at Cordillera in Edwards, near Vail is being turned into a very pricey rehab facility. It's crazy expensive to live in the area, but it would put you smack dab in the middle of the mountains. Look at housing in the Eagle and Gypsum areas for reasonable commutes and slightly better pricing but expect to pay $2800 to rent a house and $450k-$550k to buy.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2017, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Cypress
4 posts, read 11,389 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunner View Post
Here are some thoughts to get you started even though you don't know many details yet:

To be an hour from a big city (Denver or Colorado Springs) puts you somewhere in the Front Range (I25 corridor). In CO vs Houston there's a sharper demarcation between urban areas and "country". Depending which direction you go an hour may put you in the middle of nowhere. An hour from Houston still has a lot of towns nearby (think Hempstead or Sealy).

If your husband is in oil & gas jobs are most likely in Denver (if in an office) or northern CO closer to WY if working in the field.

You might check out the area between Denver and Colorado Springs (like Castle Rock) which would give access to jobs in either city while still being in the country.

Being able to see the mountains doesn't get old.

If you don't need to be an hour from a big city that opens up more possibilities.


Good luck.
I've noticed more possibilities further from the city
Thank you for the information!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2017, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Cypress
4 posts, read 11,389 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrby View Post
If you have never been to Colorado, the first visit needs to be to the front range: Ft. Collins south to Pueblo. Your priority needs to be on the Denver to Colorado Springs portion with further exploration north and south as time permits. Durango is a great place, but it does not seem to fit your requirements.

There are many places scattered around that might work very well for you, and a great many that would be a poor fit. You really are going to have to determine where the jobs are first.

Frontier is offering weekend Houston-Denver flights for as little as $150. I'd book some.

If you literally need to "see mountains" you have a lot of shopping to do. You cannot even narrow it down to a community. Views vary by street and even specific lot. There is a lot to be said for living where you need to be and going to a mountain location when convenient. Work commutes are every day, after all.

Thank you so much for the specific locations and the information about the flights! That is super helpful! I think I will eventually get over the need to "see mountains" just being within driving distance to a good hike will suit me just fine. We were hoping to have a few acres with a house, rather than a house in the city and some weekend property, but you know, priorities...lol and I've accepted that. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing somewhere that might be what we're looking for.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top