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Old 07-05-2017, 03:56 PM
 
1,019 posts, read 1,101,737 times
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The financial challenges of the labor shortage have become so pronounced, it’s forcing more and more builders towards luxury projects to help recoup the added cost of delays.
YEP.
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Old 07-06-2017, 09:09 AM
 
640 posts, read 243,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
"Colorado faces massive shortage of construction workers. A fix won’t be easy.
Construction needs skilled workers, and they can’t hit the job market quickly enough."


By 2025, the state expects to add 56,000 new construction jobs, and 40,000 more could become available because of retirements, according to an economic impact study released in January by the CSU researchers. Right now, the industry employs 148,604.

The shortage is nationwide but particularly distressing in Colorado, a state with the lowest unemployment rate in the country, 2.3 percent, coupled with one of the highest growth rates. In other words, there are a lot of things to build and too few people to build them. As some observers put it, if you are unemployed in this state now, there’s a reason — typically a lack of skills.

Colorado faces massive shortage of construction workers. A fix won't be easy.

I've read that the housing demand in Colorado Springs is so large that new houses are now sold before they even have drywall.

I also think that we've lost workers due to the current posture wrt illegals.
Maybe too much toking up the dank.. kidding..

So the equation is not enough workers along with not enough skilled workers.

The answer is more technical skills programs to get the workers (along with cutting entitlement benefits but that's another issue). The answer is not hiring illegals LMAO!
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Old 07-07-2017, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,174 posts, read 2,618,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo_Lorem View Post
So the equation is not enough workers along with not enough skilled workers.

The answer is more technical skills programs to get the workers (along with cutting entitlement benefits but that's another issue). The answer is not hiring illegals LMAO!
Technical Skills Programs will help pull some people from low wage service sectors to construction, but the biggest issue is even though construction is starting to again pay a decently higher wage premium compared to other sectors, it's still not remotely worth it given the drawbacks of working construction:

Workplace culture - godawful, and often times cutthroat
Work schedule - pretty reasonable to assume you'll have to work a decent amount of overtime and weekends when things heat up
Commute - worse than places with a fixed location
Job Stability - pretty lousy
Work Environment - outside in the elements (cold, wind, horrible UV exposure in CO), no options for lunch but what you bring with you...
Safety and long term health - pretty bad. Working in more physical labour demanding sectors like can really beat up the body after a while.
Benefits - what?

Given all that ^^ we need about 10-20 more years of shortages to raise the pay/benefits to make the construction industry attract the talent that it should have.

If it weren't for a continual torrent of unskilled labourers/immigrants who will just suck up all of the above for a paycheck, the construction industry would be a lot different, and buildings would be more expensive, but better built.

Given the current state, we still need to continue to push people away from the sector to other jobs. Having worked in both office and landscaping environments, I'd take an office job ANY DAY, it taxes so much less for a similar paycheck.
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Old 07-07-2017, 07:39 PM
 
Location: mancos
7,169 posts, read 6,443,061 times
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HaHaha we have to bring our own lunch!!! You don't even have a clue how to stay alive.
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Old 07-07-2017, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,902 posts, read 6,492,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parfleche View Post
HaHaha we have to bring our own lunch!!! You don't even have a clue how to stay alive.
I don't know what this means.
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Old 07-07-2017, 11:08 PM
 
6,942 posts, read 3,025,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertGray View Post
If they use such cheep labor why do they charge so much for a new home?
The general who bids the job pockets any profits. The homes are worth what the market will bare (mostly based on the real estate value and where the real estate is, ie you could probably put up a shanty in parts of socal and charge half a mil because its coveted socal property).


If the general could bid a job and charge market price for the house and use slave labor he would. Oh wait thats exactly what happened over a hundred years ago.


If it were me I would gentrify an old house or find something dilapidated enough that you can get it for lot price then put up a infloor heat slab on grade metal house, the kit seller will often times supply a builder outside of little slummy oligarcy of builders in a local area.

Last edited by pittsflyer; 07-07-2017 at 11:20 PM..
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Old 07-07-2017, 11:11 PM
 
6,942 posts, read 3,025,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Because they can. Profit motive ya know. pretty sure they didn't go into business to be altruistic, other wise they would work at non-profits.




I'd like to think so, but so many people moving here want a new home that better fits their immediate lifestyle that they are willing to pass over lower priced structures 30-50 years old that need some make-overs. But, I really think there are a host of influencing factors in all of these decisions as well.
We are way past profit motive and are far far along into full blown vulture capitalism. Making an honest profit is one thing using every kiniving scheme the human mind can dream up to screw people is where we are now.
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Old 07-07-2017, 11:20 PM
 
6,942 posts, read 3,025,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wilberry View Post
The financial challenges of the labor shortage have become so pronounced, itís forcing more and more builders towards luxury projects to help recoup the added cost of delays.
YEP.
Cool they are lucky that they have an abundance of luxury home buyers.
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Old 07-07-2017, 11:23 PM
 
6,942 posts, read 3,025,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
I don't know what this means.
Its passive aggressive tripe
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Old 07-08-2017, 12:54 AM
 
33 posts, read 30,009 times
Reputation: 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsflyer View Post
The general who bids the job pockets any profits. The homes are worth what the market will bare (mostly based on the real estate value and where the real estate is, ie you could probably put up a shanty in parts of socal and charge half a mil because its coveted socal property).


If the general could bid a job and charge market price for the house and use slave labor he would. Oh wait thats exactly what happened over a hundred years ago.


If it were me I would gentrify an old house or find something dilapidated enough that you can get it for lot price then put up a infloor heat slab on grade metal house, the kit seller will often times supply a builder outside of little slummy oligarcy of builders in a local area.
Total Profit = Number of homes built x (Selling price of Home - Total cost to build a home)

New homes in other parts of the US are selling for ~$300,000. This is roughly 3/5 the selling price.

Assuming they are making a profit couldn't builders in Colorado afford to pay construction workers a little more so they can build more houses and still make the same if not a larger profit?

I just don't get the housing market here. There is nothing but room to build North/South/East of Denver. I can't imagine prices staying as high as they are.
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