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Old 07-20-2017, 09:34 PM
 
11,256 posts, read 43,208,400 times
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getting a laugh out of duster1979's post above ....

1) their personal anecdotal experience with altitude sickness is not necessarily what many people coming from sea level to Denver's altitude may experience. Bully for them that they had no difficulties and could consume alcohol with impunity at Estes Park altitude.

But many people experience altitude sickness symptoms at Denver, to a nominal extent, which may take a day or two (or more) to get acclimated to from sea level. Alcohol consumption can exacerbate those problems, even just one beer, for some of them. (I have a cousin from Baltimore that has brought several "friends" along on some of her visits to our 6,000' elevation ranch that have had serious difficulties with altitude sickness for days. Our plan to head up to Vail for a few days has been a difficult experience for some of them ... and twice, we've had guests get rip-snorting wasted drunk on very minimal altitude sickness effects of one beer or a couple glasses of wine when they had minimal altitude sickness discomfort symptoms. We try to warn them of the possible adverse effects, but you just don't know until it hits you ....)

2) As a Denver shop owner that catered to a lot of sea level owners that kept a car stored in Denver for their trips to their 2nd homes in Colorado ... oft times in mountain resort communities ... I've had a lot of contact over 5 decades with folk that needed to spend a few days in Denver to acclimate before heading to the higher altitudes. It wasn't uncommon for me to have to deliver cars to their mountain residences because they found it prudent to take public transportation to their higher altitude homes rather than drive when feeling quite ill from the altitude for the first few days of their trip here. And I've known some folk, otherwise in good health, that didn't adjust in a couple of weeks. It's difficult to predict who will experience such symptoms, but it does happen. Adequate hydration is important, but alcohol for some folk can be devastating.

3) As far as adequate HP in a car for mountain driving goes .... I've been driving BMW 2002's with 120 HP since 1971, and they are more than sufficient to bust speed limits with a couple and baggage anywhere in the hills. Or my MB 300Dturbo's with a whopping 90 HP can do the same. Or my Subaru's station wagons/OBW's with anywhere from 135 HP to 160 HP. Or my Peugeot 505TD's with 85 HP. How do these low(er) HP cars manage to climb the hills? very easily ... the "magic" is in using the transmission to DOWNSHIFT as required to keep the engine spinning happily. So rather than mindlessly staying in top gear (5th in my Subie's, for example) ... one simply chooses the appropriate lower gear for the hill climbs. Works like a champ ... and still delivers good fuel economy (typically 28 mpg composite for my 2001 Subie 2.5 ltr cars for commutes to Vail or Aspen) and 300,000 mile engine life.

The bottom line is that few cars are so underpowered these days that they cannot achieve reasonable mountain driving ability. You have but to drive them reasonably. Will all of them have power to spare to blast pass slow moving traffic in the passing zone areas? no. But they will suffice for normal driving. Otherwise, consider renting a higher performance car, such as a pony car with a larger V-8 engine, or a real sports car for your trip. There is something to be said for the pleasures of driving a rented top-down Mustang (or a Porsche) for your Colorado mountain vacation driving ... and these types of cars are readily available to rent.

OP, c'mon out ... have a wonderful vacation in Colorado. Set reasonable travel goals in view of the many activities here and you'll do fine. Should you experience some discomfort from the altitude, adjust your travels and activities to allow yourself to acclimate and know your limitations for the next trip out. Understand that you're traveling on a major holiday weekend and traffic here will be heavy in virtually any direction during most hours of the day ... destination travelers, locals out for the day ... and so forth.

Last edited by sunsprit; 07-20-2017 at 10:10 PM..
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Old 08-30-2017, 01:47 PM
 
262 posts, read 151,378 times
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Some people develop altitude sickness when climinbing quickly above 10,000ft. Does that happen to people who walk or to drivers too?

My doctor prescribed Diamox (acetozalamide) to prevent altitude sickness but since I plan to do mostly driving, drink plenty of water and use sunscreen, I think I won't need it.
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Old 08-30-2017, 01:49 PM
 
5,323 posts, read 7,172,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nwman2830 View Post
Some people develop altitude sickness when climinbing quickly above 10,000ft. Does that happen to people who walk or to drivers too?

My doctor prescribed Diamox (acetozalamide) to prevent altitude sickness but since I plan to do mostly driving, drink plenty of water and use sunscreen, I think I won't need it.
I can happen to drivers, too.
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Old 08-30-2017, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,905 posts, read 6,501,326 times
Reputation: 7355
Quote:
Originally Posted by nwman2830 View Post
Some people develop altitude sickness when climinbing quickly above 10,000ft. Does that happen to people who walk or to drivers too?

My doctor prescribed Diamox (acetozalamide) to prevent altitude sickness but since I plan to do mostly driving, drink plenty of water and use sunscreen, I think I won't need it.
It can be worse driving because you are going up faster. It's a result of the altitude, not the activity. Sunscreen doesn't stop altitude sickness.
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