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Old 02-06-2018, 11:04 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,362 posts, read 39,651,603 times
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Western WA has that covered.... during summers.... winter = humidity In the form of incessant drizzle. (200+ days).

Summers are not muggy. Very few mosquitoes, plenty of yellow jackets.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
21 posts, read 20,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic_Spork View Post
- Lush GREEN Forest (preferably year round), Mountain views, Sunny-Partly Cloudy 280+ days a year, access to lakes/rivers/national parks

Green: Washington all day. Colorado goes brown when it's dry, and it's often dry.
Grey/Sun: Washington is grey a lot, but as long as like 10 minutes of sunshine in between grey gloomy mist is enough to keep you going... Colorado is sunny a lot, but has monsoon season where daily thunderstorms can happen.

- Not humid/muggy in summer or clammy in winter

Low humidity: Colorado wins. Washington has clammy winters that are wet, it might not even get that cold but it FEELS very cold, it gets under your skin. Winters in Colorado (as far as I've seen) are often sunny, but we get some snow events, but then it melts and is moderate again (temps often in the 50's and sunny.) Snow vanishes quickly, except at high altitude.

- Four seasons, but none of them "extreme," I like snow but not the freezing cold!

Hm. Frankly Colorado weather is just plain unpredictable. It can be nice one minute and a crazy blast of wind and hail and torrential rain the next. Washington is far more consistent, but I wouldn't say "four seasons" necessarily. You get a couple weeks in the summer that are dry (no rain) and other than that, lots of rain, fog, wet wet wet.

- Projected to have stable drinkable fresh water sources for next 50 years

Colorado has a lot of water worries. We get drought years, where there can be serious water shortages. Washington of course has an excess of water, if anything.

- Terrain relatively inoculated against increases in wild fires, drought, landslides, flooding

Colorado: HAHAHAHAHAHAHA....ha... You must be kidding. Colorado burns. Has droughts. Flash floods often, landslides depending on factors like deforestation due to fires. Rinse repeat.

Washington: Can also have these problems. But not as frequent a concern in one's life, as far as I can tell. However, be aware that the dirt in Washington is flammable. I once saw a 2 foot across section of bare dirt get up to a pretty fierce smoulder because someone put a cigarette butt out in it. It's because it is comprised of organic matter from the trees, which shed...tree...stuff...pretty much constantly. Seed pods, bits of bark, needles. Just stuff. It took 5 big pitchers of water to put it out. I'm surprised the state doesn't burn more than it does, and can only assume it's due to the typical rain.

- No or very minimal misquitoes/ticks (they love me)

Ticks are everywhere. We don't have a ton of bugs here, and no mosquitoes. Cat and dog fleas don't thrive here in Colorado either, and I think that's pretty cool. Some areas get scorpions.

I don't remember mosquitoes being a huge problem in Washington either, but they ought to be with all of the wet there. I do recall that each fall, the spiders were completely out of control.

- 20+ Acres for under 200k (the more the better)

No idea. But Washington and Colorado are on the high end as far as cost of housing and property are concerned. Washington used to be much higher, but Colorado has been going up fast in the last year or so. Some think it is a "bubble" and that it will be temporary and the market will eventually settle down.

- Area hospitable to off grid living

No idea, especially with regard to WA. I do know that in Colorado, you're going to have more success with solar power, but you'll have to worry about getting water rights. Until last year, collecting rainwater in any way, deliberately, was illegal. The law changed last year, but it's still very limited. Here is a thing about that:
Collecting Rainwater Still Illegal in Much of Colorado - Lot-Lines

- Secluded but within 30 mins of small town and 2-4 hours of a major city with highly ranked gynecological/reproductive hospital departments.
**LGBTQ State Protections, Legal Recreational Marijuana Use A Must** Progressive tax structure a plus.

Cities and services...I'm not sure. Mostly I question if you can find the kind of land you want, at the price you want, within that range of a city with those facilities in either state, or which might work better. Of course we have the MJ thing here. LGBTQ stuff...I think Colorado is mostly friendly there, but not sure about laws. Tax structure, I'm not sure what you mean by that. We have TABOR here (Taxpayer's Bill of Rights) which means among other things, that we vote on new taxes or increases. Most of the time people vote no, even if it's for a good reason that would benefit us, because people at least in the Springs, don't trust the government to do what we want them to with the money. But other parts of the state have different politics about people supporting tax efforts. We do have a state income tax, and it is significant. Washington does not have a state income tax, but will tax you to the moon and back on property and sales and such.


I have lived in Olympia, WA and feel pretty confident speaking about western WA in general...I've lived in Colorado Springs, and feel confident speaking about Colorado Springs, but not the rest of Colorado, as things like weather and political behavior do vary a lot in different parts of the state.

Hi Sonic,
We're heading from Colo Spgs to the Puget Sound area. Originally from MI and MA so we miss the water terribly, but do not want to go back to the cold. Compared to Colo Spgs, are you loving Olympia? That happens to be one of the areas we're looking. That and the Kitsap Peninsula. Any input would be amazing! We're both teachers....as long as we get jobs! (fingers crossed)
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Old 03-31-2018, 06:02 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,210 times
Reputation: 10
You're looking for the same climate I am. I've lived I. CA OR and MN. My friend wants to have a greenhouse, and I want to perform weddings. So, we need the right weather and not too far from "civilization". And bugs love me, too. Have you considered Idaho, Oregon, Northern California?
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Old 03-31-2018, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Washington State
18,122 posts, read 9,395,568 times
Reputation: 15467
Quote:
Originally Posted by votz View Post
Hi All,

I'm looking to buy 20+ Acres of property (the more the better) and permanently relocate to either rural PNW (Washington state) or rural Colorado and wanted to know what areas would be best suited for my needs, any help would be great!

I'm ~30 years old, and the area must be projected to be livable in the next 50 years, according to climate change predictions. So far I've been looking into Sequim/San Juan Islands/possibly Bellingham in WA but land costs seem a little prohibative. I'm becoming more interested in Colorado but don't know a lot about CO. I'll be building my own house myself with either cob, cordword, "earthship" or timber framing construction and I'll be growing my own food in greenhouses. I'll be location siting based on winter azimuth sun angles, to maximize passive heating and cooling and using runoff water catchment, greywater, and composting toilet systems (not interested in septic). The idea is to create a "luxury" eco-village bed and breakfast/event hosting "camp" type place to host weddings and/or corporate retreats that can then in turn fund an artist residency. Must have fairly easy all-season road accessibility and ideally within half a day's train/bus/drive to a major airport. Must be very "scenic" and located in a progressive state.

I'm moving from Chicago, IL, mainly because it's much too gray/brown here in the winter and I'm no longer interested in living in cities. Having two week spans of complete overcast is not uncommon here in the winter, and I've been suffering from SADD and Vitamin D deficiency since I've lived here (~6 years). I'm very sensitive to sun/clouds/light - I love a cozy cloudy rainy day peppered here and there (too much sun every day makes me a little too wired for my liking), but I can't live in a predominantly overcast area, even if it's for one-season (i.e., one season very grey with the rest being sunny). I'd like to be closer to hiking/canoeing/outdoor adventures as well. National parks are a must. Also, I have Endometriosis so I need to be within 2-3 hours from a major hospital with high rankings for gynecological departments. Also, while I enjoy snow and generally don't mind the cold, I'm not interested in having freezing winds/rain/sleet/-30 to 15 degree F days anymore. I enjoy 4 seasons and ideally winters would be green, a little snowy and stay in the 20-40 degree range, summers preferably mild, low-ish humidity (not muggy) and green. No scrub brush for me! Many trees/lakes/waterfalls please.

So, to recap, here's what I'm looking for:

- Lush GREEN Forest (preferably year round), Mountain views, Sunny-Partly Cloudy 280+ days a year, access to lakes/rivers/national parks
- Not humid/muggy in summer or clammy in winter
- Four seasons, but none of them "extreme," I like snow but not the freezing cold!
- Projected to have stable drinkable fresh water sources for next 50 years
- Terrain relatively inoculated against increases in wild fires, drought, landslides, flooding
- No or very minimal misquitoes/ticks (they love me)
- 20+ Acres for under 200k (the more the better)
- Area hospitable to off grid living
- Secluded but within 30 mins of small town and 2-4 hours of a major city with highly ranked gynecological/reproductive hospital departments.
**LGBTQ State Protections, Legal Recreational Marijuana Use A Must** Progressive tax structure a plus.

I'm also open to hearing about other states but I'm pretty set on PNW and CO as possibilities, *not* interested in Northeastern/Southern/Midwest (already lived there both rurally and city wise - they're great, but not for me!.

Thank you so much!
This is a fictional place you seek, you'll have to smoke a lot of weed to "find it."

If you suffer from SADD, Washington state is a terrible location. From all of your requirements, I would say northern California would come the closest.
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Old 04-07-2018, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
998 posts, read 623,033 times
Reputation: 2018
IMO, Washington is a much nicer state than Colorado.

Salaries and wages tend to be higher in Washington with the added benefit of no state income tax. Also, Seattle is more economically viable than Denver largely due to less workforce competition in knowledge-based industry sectors. With other major cities nearby such as Portland, OR and Vancouver, BC, there is simply greater economic depth and diversity in the Pacific Northwest than in the Front Range, whose only major economic hub is Denver.

Additionally, the climate in western Washington is milder than just about anywhere in Colorado. Most importantly, there are no tornadoes in Washington -- ever. If you're coming from the Midwest or Texas, where most Denver transplants originate, then the treat of violent tornadoes and high winds may not phase you, but if you're coming from California or New England, then you will want to avoid eastern Colorado. Tornadoes are horrible, IMO.

Finally, the scenery, in particular the forestry and coastal vistas, along the Puget Sound and Pacific coast of Washington state is unparalleled in Colorado, which is mostly brown and parched-looking and, in many areas, extremely flat and treeless. FWIW, there is no Chuckanut Drive in Colorado.
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Old 04-07-2018, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,898 posts, read 6,480,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
IMO, Washington is a much nicer state than Colorado.

Salaries and wages tend to be higher in Washington with the added benefit of no state income tax. Also, Seattle is more economically viable than Denver largely due to less workforce competition in knowledge-based industry sectors. With other major cities nearby such as Portland, OR and Vancouver, BC, there is simply greater economic depth and diversity in the Pacific Northwest than in the Front Range, whose only major economic hub is Denver.

Additionally, the climate in western Washington is milder than just about anywhere in Colorado. Most importantly, there are no tornadoes in Washington -- ever. If you're coming from the Midwest or Texas, where most Denver transplants originate, then the treat of violent tornadoes and high winds may not phase you, but if you're coming from California or New England, then you will want to avoid eastern Colorado. Tornadoes are horrible, IMO.

Finally, the scenery, in particular the forestry and coastal vistas, along the Puget Sound and Pacific coast of Washington state is unparalleled in Colorado, which is mostly brown and parched-looking and, in many areas, extremely flat and treeless. FWIW, there is no Chuckanut Drive in Colorado.
Is there a Trail Ridge Toad in Washington? How about a Million Dollar Highway? I prefer sunshine and high mountain vistas to gloomy coastal rain. Don’t get me wrong, I like Seattle, but to say that it is unequivocally better the way you are is ludicrous.

As for you “most important” point regarding tornadoes in Denver, please let me know the last time a tornado did major damage in the Meetro Area. There are major tornadoes out in the eastern planes, but a high strength tornado in Denver? No.

Economically, Denver is the regional hub. That means that while in other areas jobs are more spread out, that’s not the case here. It simplifies things.
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Old 04-07-2018, 03:20 PM
 
3,734 posts, read 3,964,517 times
Reputation: 2549
Chuckanut Drive is pleasant for a brief period; but after doing it a few times, I have no need / desire to do it again.
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Old 04-07-2018, 03:58 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,647 posts, read 2,504,071 times
Reputation: 9071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Most importantly, there are no tornadoes in Washington -- ever. If you're coming from the Midwest or Texas, where most Denver transplants originate, then the treat of violent tornadoes and high winds may not phase you, but if you're coming from California or New England, then you will want to avoid eastern Colorado. Tornadoes are horrible, IMO.
On the other hand, you'll want to read up on the Cascadia Subduction Zone regarding significant earthquake risk. When "the big one" hits there, it is likely to be a very big one, indeed.

It affects Washington and Oregon.

Last edited by SFBayBoomer; 04-07-2018 at 04:08 PM..
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Old 04-08-2018, 08:35 AM
 
13,280 posts, read 25,435,252 times
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Washington has a 9 percent sales tax. I found this out by unfortunate accident, when I bought my house kit for Colorado from a Washington company. Sales tax is one thing, but on a house kit? Several thousand bucks.
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:42 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,362 posts, read 39,651,603 times
Reputation: 23366
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Washington has a 9 percent sales tax. I found this out by unfortunate accident, when I bought my house kit for Colorado from a Washington company. Sales tax is one thing, but on a house kit? Several thousand bucks.
If WA product was delivered to CO, you should have paid only CO rate sales tax.

But... it is at the discretion of the WA busines how they choose to collect, suince WA DOR will force them to itemize and quantify wha sales were 'OOS'. Or frequent OR and MT resident shoppers (zero sales tax) (And indigenous peoples) are quite insistent that WA businesses not charge them sales tax. And most comply with their requests. It is really quite simple for a business to report WA sales tax exclusions on big items. (worth asking)
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