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Old 08-06-2017, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,897 posts, read 6,480,286 times
Reputation: 7347

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Using this year as the benchmark for precipitation is really ridiculous.

Yes it rains in the afternoon, but usually not this much.

Instead of asking people for anecdotes, why not look at historic averages? Freak On A Leash is showing you a week long weather forecast for Breckenridge, but failing to mention that typically Breck gets a total of 1.75" of rain in July and 1.66" in August.

I've been hiking mountains and camping in Colorado since the 90s. The rule has alway been to be off a peak before noon, but thats because of lightning. I always carry a rain jacket, but it is not frequent that I'm using it for more than an hour.
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:56 AM
 
3,104 posts, read 2,826,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freak On a Leash View Post
Here's your typical 3 pm weather map here in the mountains. And this is what I almost always see between noon-5pm. I usually try and get home and take a nap. Sometimes I have to work in it. Ugh.

I wish someone had clued me in on how often it rains here in the summer. I'll be glad when it snows. I'm a big skier and love to snowshoe.
The mountains are a great place to have a house. A tent? No so much.

I love sitting out on the deck, grilling some steaks, watching the storms roll through and hearing the thunder bounce off the mountains, knowing that mother nature is watering the trails for me. I go to bed early and get up to a beautiful crisp, blue bird morning. It doesn't get any better than that!

Not to mention, the rain helps keep the crowds away.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:00 AM
 
5,318 posts, read 7,156,033 times
Reputation: 5049
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
Using this year as the benchmark for precipitation is really ridiculous.

Yes it rains in the afternoon, but usually not this much.

Instead of asking people for anecdotes, why not look at historic averages? Freak On A Leash is showing you a week long weather forecast for Breckenridge, but failing to mention that typically Breck gets a total of 1.75" of rain in July and 1.66" in August.

I've been hiking mountains and camping in Colorado since the 90s. The rule has alway been to be off a peak before noon, but thats because of lightning. I always carry a rain jacket, but it is not frequent that I'm using it for more than an hour.
Agreed.
And there is just something unColoradan to complain about rainy weather LOL. Lightning and flash flooding are always big concerns here - and hail - but usually the precip totals aren't this high. Personally I am loving the cooler temperatures although it has been a bit muggy. And loving that we've largely avoided the severe weather issues of summer like hail, tornadoes and lightning so far this year.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:01 AM
 
3,104 posts, read 2,826,994 times
Reputation: 4029
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
Using this year as the benchmark for precipitation is really ridiculous.

Yes it rains in the afternoon, but usually not this much.
It's business as usual here in Breck. During the monsoons, it always rains in the afternoon unless it's a drought year.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,041 posts, read 2,067,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NBUplander View Post
How has Colorado escaped this reputation? Of course people who live there know what's up, but outsiders are clueless on how much rain can foil summer adventure. When we were skiing in Telluride almost all the locals we talked said the winter lured them in but the summer is their favorite time of year. Maybe they are festival goers instead of back country users.
Please keep in mind that Freak on a Leash has only resided in Colorado for one summer. Hardly enough time to create to an overview of longer weather patterns we have in Colorado, hence its reputation is a bit divergent form his Freak's perception. Freak's vocal complaining about our constant raininess reflects this lack of context over a longer term and why the local's really don't mind.

Elevation has an influence on weather that many have no idea of how pervasive it can really be. Having spent a lifetime in the high country, I've got no problem with the rains this year, despite being more extensive, and I'm perfectly willing to accept the typically occasional afternoons storms that come with high country use because, in most years, these are brief and fleeting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freak On a Leash View Post
I honestly don't know what's up. I do know that at one time Colorado was actively advertising this "300 days of sun" as an attempt to first get settlers and then tourists to come here. At this point I'd be impressed with 30 days of sun. I'm sorry, but IMO a "sunny day" is a day without rain. I'm not even talking clouds but no precip! Maybe those 65 rainy days are all in July and August?

In a similar thread I was flamed and called crazy for suggesting that too much rain could be a bad thing! Go figure! People seem to think it's okay that most of their day is rained out over and over again but for me, life is short and I have an exaggerated hatred for rainy damp weather bordering on obsession. I cancel trips and change locales because of rain and I've always been like this. Some people hate cold and winter and I love it. I hate rain and dampness. It makes me agitated and depressed. I've tried to talking myself into it. I've tried living with it. I just can't and now I've built a life where I can move around and accommodate myself so that's what I do.
Unfortunately, you are another victim of the Colorado marketing machine. We do get a lot of days of sunshine and if you look at meterological requirements for sunny day, which is not necessarily without clouds or rain, we do meet those requirements.

We think your crazy to complain about it because, typically, summers here are dry, and hot, with only short bursts of brief showers on occasion. Again, as I said above, you lack the larger context to understand why, to us locals, this is a refreshing break to the routine.

If you have the ability to bail and go someplace else that better fits your mood and needs, then by all means go and find your happiness. Life is too short to be miserable if you don't have to be. For us longer term locals, this rain adds to our happiness because it mitigates wildfire risk, keeps valleys green, and promotes a lot of wildflowers and growth that we do not typically get to experience to this degree. Just like some hate cold and winter, anyone who has been here for any length of time understands the rarity of this degree of rain and is appreciating it.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,897 posts, read 6,480,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado^ View Post
It's business as usual here in Breck. During the monsoons, it always rains in the afternoon unless it's a drought year.
Yep. I climbed Democrat, Lincoln, Cameron, and Bross on Wednesday. Left Denver at 4:30am was off the 4th peak by 11:00. Some rain came through after we were finished.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:42 AM
 
5,288 posts, read 2,740,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado^ View Post
Sorry, but you don't know what you're taking about. I live at 10,000ft on a dirt road and have spent 1,000's of hours on the trails here.

Moonsoons don't make the trails muddy. They just give the perfect amount of moisture/grip for the ride the next morning.

The only time the mountains get mud is from snowmelt and/or moisture heavy spring snow in April/May.

Sorry, you only know the mud around you.

I too have lived on a dirt road, biked literally thousands of trail miles in many parts of the state, and can tell one type of mud from another.

You don't have a clue about mud in other parts of the state. Monsoons that soak the soil eventually saturate it. In an area with lots of well-drained gravelly soil, the moisture goes down, leaving the surface dry. That is not the only type of soil in CO, far from it. The monsoons this year have been so frequent and heavy that there is slumping mud, new deep erosion gullies, and other delights. Just because it's not in your area doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:52 AM
 
5,288 posts, read 2,740,534 times
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To the OP:

You did not mention employment but did say you can't afford to stay in Seattle and take off for winters elsewhere. If money matters, have you priced housing in those ski resort towns? The state as a whole is getting more expensive to rent or buy in.

Assuming jobs and commuting are not a factor, maybe you could sell the Seattle house, buy a less expensive home in maritime western WA (dry but cool summers), and use the difference to fund winter travel. This arrangement allows you to have one foot in and one foot out. NO place is going to be perfect. Repeat over and over...
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Old 08-06-2017, 01:23 PM
 
21 posts, read 11,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
To the OP:

You did not mention employment but did say you can't afford to stay in Seattle and take off for winters elsewhere. If money matters, have you priced housing in those ski resort towns? The state as a whole is getting more expensive to rent or buy in.

Assuming jobs and commuting are not a factor, maybe you could sell the Seattle house, buy a less expensive home in maritime western WA (dry but cool summers), and use the difference to fund winter travel. This arrangement allows you to have one foot in and one foot out. NO place is going to be perfect. Repeat over and over...
That is certainly an option I need to consider. An affordable house in Seattle is pretty crappy though. The cost of housing is almost the same in Seattle as a CO ski town, and our property taxes are 5-10x higher depending on location. Downsizing in my home town feels defeating, but downsizing to live somewhere better seems okay to me.

I need the equity in this home to quit working so downsizing is going to happen regardless.

I can afford one lower end home in a ski town, but not two homes in different states. I'd have to keep working to pull that off. My ideal goal is to quit working and live where I want to play. Being close to skiing is important, but summer activities even more so.

Based on your earlier suggestion I've put Bend back on the list. Each time I've been there in the summer it has gotten really hot, but looking at historic climate data the hot spells are short lived and there are quite a few July and Aug days with highs only in the 70's. It's not quite small town living, but certainly way less populated than Western WA.

Sun Valley ID, or at least the surrounding area may be a good fit too. It's been a while since I've been there, and I've never studied desirable locations to live.

I'm so drawn to the CO Rockies though. It's disappointing to give up on that dream. Living in Telluride and rarely needing to get in the car for anything is very appealing.
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Old 08-06-2017, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,897 posts, read 6,480,286 times
Reputation: 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by NBUplander View Post
That is certainly an option I need to consider. An affordable house in Seattle is pretty crappy though. The cost of housing is almost the same in Seattle as a CO ski town, and our property taxes are 5-10x higher depending on location. Downsizing in my home town feels defeating, but downsizing to live somewhere better seems okay to me.

I need the equity in this home to quit working so downsizing is going to happen regardless.

I can afford one lower end home in a ski town, but not two homes in different states. I'd have to keep working to pull that off. My ideal goal is to quit working and live where I want to play. Being close to skiing is important, but summer activities even more so.

Based on your earlier suggestion I've put Bend back on the list. Each time I've been there in the summer it has gotten really hot, but looking at historic climate data the hot spells are short lived and there are quite a few July and Aug days with highs only in the 70's. It's not quite small town living, but certainly way less populated than Western WA.

Sun Valley ID, or at least the surrounding area may be a good fit too. It's been a while since I've been there, and I've never studied desirable locations to live.

I'm so drawn to the CO Rockies though. It's disappointing to give up on that dream. Living in Telluride and rarely needing to get in the car for anything is very appealing.
Telluride averages for rainfall
June: 1.26"
July: 2.04"
August: 2.21"

Steamboat
June: 1.43"
July: 1.46"
August: 1.46"

Bend
June: 0.75"
July: 0.62"
August: 0.6"

Sun Valley
June: 1.48"
July: 0.86"
August: 0.82"

Just remember, forests that don't get rain in the summer are more prone to fires. Everything is a trade off.
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