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Old 08-06-2017, 03:52 PM
 
3,104 posts, read 2,826,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Sorry, you only know the mud around you.

I too have lived on a dirt road, biked literally thousands of trail miles in many parts of the state, and can tell one type of mud from another.

You don't have a clue about mud in other parts of the state. Monsoons that soak the soil eventually saturate it. In an area with lots of well-drained gravelly soil, the moisture goes down, leaving the surface dry. That is not the only type of soil in CO, far from it. The monsoons this year have been so frequent and heavy that there is slumping mud, new deep erosion gullies, and other delights. Just because it's not in your area doesn't mean it doesn't exist.

I've lived close to 20 years in CO and 1/2 of that in the mountains. I've done "thousands" of miles off road in the CO mountains every month from June to September.

The only place I've had a problem with mud outside of mud-season is the western slope after 24 hours of heavy rain.

Monsoons in the resort towns don't drop that much rain. It has to rain hard for 4 or 5 hours to saturate the ground enough to cause mud the next day. It's simply a non-issue at high elevations where the resort towns are located.

It's pretty much exclusively April/May when you need to stay off the trails due to mud. That's why it's called mud season.

Last edited by Colorado^; 08-06-2017 at 05:14 PM..
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Old 08-06-2017, 05:07 PM
 
21 posts, read 11,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
Telluride averages for rainfall
June: 1.26"
July: 2.04"
August: 2.21"

Steamboat
June: 1.43"
July: 1.46"
August: 1.46"

Bend
June: 0.75"
July: 0.62"
August: 0.6"

Sun Valley
June: 1.48"
July: 0.86"
August: 0.82"

Just remember, forests that don't get rain in the summer are more prone to fires. Everything is a trade off.
I wonder what those totals will be for July 2017? My wife can confirm she saw far more than 2" of rain during her 30 day hike. One sustained downpour for 4 hours, which she had many of, will dump 2" or more.

Fire season and bad air quality are indeed bummers. Sun Valley had some terrible fires a couple years ago. WA is always on fire in the summer. We just hope the winds keep blowing the smoke east and out of the mountains.
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Old 08-06-2017, 05:25 PM
 
5,288 posts, read 2,740,534 times
Reputation: 9791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado^ View Post
I've lived close to 20 years in CO and 1/2 of that in the mountains. I've done "thousands" of miles off road in the CO mountains every month from June to September.

The only place I've had a problem with mud outside of mud-season is the western slope after 24 hours of heavy rain.

Monsoons in the resort towns don't drop that much rain. It has to rain hard for 4 or 5 hours to saturate the ground enough to cause mud the next day. It's simply a non-issue at high elevations where the resort towns are located.

It's pretty much exclusively April/May when you need to stay off the trails due to mud. That's why it's called the mud season.
I lived longer than your 20 years in CO, nyah nyah nyah.

Western slope is where I was talking. A large part of the state that you forgot about in your exhortation to ride muddy trails (and which the OP alluded to by asking about Telluride). You don't need a steady 24 hrs of rain for the mud to become a problem. These daily monsoons are doing it in some places. There are different kinds of sticky mud, too, not just one. Some are way worse than others.

I can think of two very high-elevation areas that have been trashed by motorized use when they were muddy. It wasn't 24-hr rain that made them soggy, either. So if you think the damage only happens below 10,000 ft altitude, WRONG.
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Old 08-06-2017, 05:36 PM
 
239 posts, read 138,266 times
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If the OP wants decent summer weather for enjoying the outdoors, the Northwest is already pretty much perfect. The only place in the U.S. that's drier and sunnier in the summer would be California and parts of Arizona and Nevada. Colorado's strength is the fairly dry autumns. Enjoying fall colors is much easier when everything isn't soaked, as during late October/November in the Northwest. Summers can have significant dry stretches, but the rain tends to come as heavy downpours during storms.
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Old 08-06-2017, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,897 posts, read 6,480,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NBUplander View Post
I wonder what those totals will be for July 2017? My wife can confirm she saw far more than 2" of rain during her 30 day hike. One sustained downpour for 4 hours, which she had many of, will dump 2" or more.

Fire season and bad air quality are indeed bummers. Sun Valley had some terrible fires a couple years ago. WA is always on fire in the summer. We just hope the winds keep blowing the smoke east and out of the mountains.
I looked, but couldn't find the data. Knowing what the averages are and what your wife experienced should give you enough info to make an informed decision.

We had a massive downpour blow through Denver this afternoon. It lasted about 20 minutes. That's the type of storms I'm used to seeing in the mountains as well.
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Old 08-07-2017, 08:28 AM
 
3,104 posts, read 2,826,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
I lived longer than your 20 years in CO, nyah nyah nyah.
You're the one who said, "You only know the mud in your area" or something to that effect.
That's the reason I mentioned the amount of time I've been in CO.


Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Western slope is where I was talking. A large part of the state that you forgot about in your exhortation to ride muddy trails (and which the OP alluded to by asking about Telluride).


Where exactly did I suggest anyone ride in muddy conditions.

Since you have no clue, let me fill you in. Dirt bikers love traction. Mud has no traction and will kill your suspension, bearings and drive train in no time. We hate mud.

What we love is dirt, after rain. It has tons of grip and causes less trail damage than riding in dry conditions.





Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
You don't need a steady 24 hrs of rain for the mud to become a problem.
I never said you did. I said the the only time I had a problem with mud in CO, outside of the mud season, was after 24 hours of heavy rain.

I just waited till it dried out for 24 hours and the dirt was perfect.


Quote:
I can think of two very high-elevation areas that have been trashed by motorized use when they were muddy. It wasn't 24-hr rain that made them soggy, either. So if you think the damage only happens below 10,000 ft altitude, WRONG.
Some Jeepers like to go "mudding". But what the hell that has that got to do with dirt biking?

Seems like you're a tree hugger going off on an ani-motorized rant, without having a clue what you're taking about.

How anyone could take what I rote and twist it into "go ride in the mud" is beyond me. But the tree huggers never let the truth get in the way and will use anything to get our areas shut down.
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Old 08-07-2017, 09:55 AM
 
5,288 posts, read 2,740,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado^ View Post
You're the one who said, "You only know the mud in your area" or something to that effect.
That's the reason I mentioned the amount of time I've been in CO.






Where exactly did I suggest anyone ride in muddy conditions.

Since you have no clue, let me fill you in. Dirt bikers love traction. Mud has no traction and will kill your suspension, bearings and drive train in no time. We hate mud.

What we love is dirt, after rain. It has tons of grip and causes less trail damage than riding in dry conditions.







I never said you did. I said the the only time I had a problem with mud in CO, outside of the mud season, was after 24 hours of heavy rain.

I just waited till it dried out for 24 hours and the dirt was perfect.


Some Jeepers like to go "mudding". But what the hell that has that got to do with dirt biking?

Seems like you're a tree hugger going off on an ani-motorized rant, without having a clue what you're taking about.

How anyone could take what I rote and twist it into "go ride in the mud" is beyond me. But the tree huggers never let the truth get in the way and will use anything to get our areas shut down.
My point was that 24 hrs isn't always enough for the mud to dry out. Maybe it does where you are, but not everywhere.

You're wrong about the anti-dirtbiking part. I support responsible use by all, motorized or not. Those are not just "your" areas; they are for other uses, too. Your first post made it sound like you are not one of the responsible riders. Anybody new to the state who interprets it as "go ride in the mud" is going to trigger the antis, as you should well know.
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Old 08-07-2017, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,826,387 times
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Whatta difference a year makes! Last summer ( 2016 ), I spent 22 days and night camping out in my tent, in the Colorado high country. During those 22 nights out, I had 21 campfires with only one rainout, due to an hour long gentle rain. That was the only rain I encountered the entire summer. My 22 days consisted of 5 - 4 night outings and 1 - 2 night outing.

This year started out great. By June 23rd I had already camped out 10 nights. I was ahead of last years pace, and thought I might get in 30 nights this summer.

Now it's August 7th, and I haven't been out even one night since June 23rd. Being a fair weather tent camper, I look for 3 or consecutive 4 days in the weather forecast for chances of rain being 30% or less. It simply hasn't happened this summer. On occasion there has been 2 days in a row of 30% or less, 5 or 6 days ahead, but when the date gets closer, the chance of rain rises dramatically.

As of right now, the weather forecast for later this week looks promising. Perhaps the wet pattern is ready to change! Time will tell.
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Old 08-07-2017, 10:18 AM
 
5,288 posts, read 2,740,534 times
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I don't know about that. There were years when the monsoons continued into early September. But I don't remember any being as frequent as it was this summer.
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Old 08-07-2017, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,897 posts, read 6,480,286 times
Reputation: 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
Whatta difference a year makes! Last summer ( 2016 ), I spent 22 days and night camping out in my tent, in the Colorado high country. During those 22 nights out, I had 21 campfires with only one rainout, due to an hour long gentle rain. That was the only rain I encountered the entire summer. My 22 days consisted of 5 - 4 night outings and 1 - 2 night outing.

This year started out great. By June 23rd I had already camped out 10 nights. I was ahead of last years pace, and thought I might get in 30 nights this summer.

Now it's August 7th, and I haven't been out even one night since June 23rd. Being a fair weather tent camper, I look for 3 or consecutive 4 days in the weather forecast for chances of rain being 30% or less. It simply hasn't happened this summer. On occasion there has been 2 days in a row of 30% or less, 5 or 6 days ahead, but when the date gets closer, the chance of rain rises dramatically.

As of right now, the weather forecast for later this week looks promising. Perhaps the wet pattern is ready to change! Time will tell.
This x1000!

If having a summer like this every now and then is enough to put you off being here, you shouldn't move, but don't think that it's like this every year.

I also bought a small camper for weather like this that serves as a base camp when it's rainy. Best of both worlds.

Personally, I love it.
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