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Old 08-15-2017, 08:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
My observations of Ridgway on the Western Slope certainly support that.
Plus one!
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Old 08-15-2017, 08:32 AM
 
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Boulder recycles AND has a compost pick up. A little confusing to my house guests, as I have two trash cans (one for regular trash, one for compost) and also a huge recycle bin in the garage. We have the smallest trash can our garbage company (Western Disposal) offers, because we end up with 1 or 2 13 gallon bags of actual trash a week. The rest goes to either recycle or compost. They charge us based on the size of that trash can. We have the biggest recycle bin they offer.

Majority of front yards in my neighborhood (including mine) are xeriscaped, not requiring any watering. I have a thick layer of trailing juniper that only requires watering during drought. In the past 5 summers since we bought this house, we had to water it 4 or 5 times.
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Gilbert, AZ
3,143 posts, read 1,933,065 times
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Every city has their own programs. In Louisville we had regular trash, recycles, and composting. So three separate bins, each on their own pickup schedules, and each with their own fees IIRC.

There used to be a public recycle drop point, just east of Old Town, which is no longer there. We no longer live in Louisville, and I'm not sure if it was moved or just eliminated. I preferred to drop it off myself, because the frequent gale force winds would sometimes knock over the curbside bins and scatter recycles all over the neighborhood. The people in the house a the end of the street got very angry at us more than once when this happened. I can understand their frustration.

I liked the system that Madison, WI had when I lived there (a long time ago, so it's probably been changed?). You could put out unlimited amounts of recyclables for free. Trash had to be placed in special bags that were sold to be used specifically for that purpose. So each house paid an amount based on how much trash they put out. Seems quite fair for consumers, but probably a nightmare for the city to manage? Much easier for the city to collect a set amount from every address each month.
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,840,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jim9251 View Post
Don't judge all of Colorado about what happens on the front range. Several western slope towns recycle, and encourage "green living".
The front range is a different world! At my Grand Junction condo, recycling is quite popular. The recycling bins were always overflowing midway thru the cycle, so we changed recycling companies. Now, even with the new company which provides twice as many bins, the bins tend to be full by the end of the cycle.
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:08 AM
 
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I was also surprised in COS to see the lack of interest in recycling when we moved here recently. It was mandatory (along with cloth shopping bags) where I moved from and not surprisingly, over time there was a noticeable decrease in litter, ex. no more plastic trash bags stuck in trees. Not a big deal to stick some cloth bags in your car for grocery shopping. It always amazes me how resolute people here are about not participating in recycling as if doing this one small thing might infringe on their rights.

Last edited by orngkat; 08-15-2017 at 10:09 AM.. Reason: mm
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
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Sadly, I asked the same question about water use when I arrived in 1982. The only real change that I've noticed is that people don't over-water their lawns as much as they used to.

In terms of transportation, Boulder was and is ahead of the curve for alternatives to single-occupancy auto transit. Denver and it's close in suburbs are also doing a good job in that respect. Most Colorado cities, however, are very auto-oriented (but then so is most of the country).

Most homes didn't have AC in the 1980s and now they do. So per-capita electricity use has risen. But newer homes are much more energy-efficient and in that respect per-capita energy use for heating has likely declined.

Colorado, is average when it comes to "greenness". But the per capita energy usage (in the US) and the per-capita water usage (in the West) is so high that average isn't anything to brag about.
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Breckenridge, Colorado
59 posts, read 32,977 times
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You went to the wrong city. You need to go to Boulder. They have 4 recycling bins for trash, plastic and bottles, compost, mix paper, etc. It's a great town in many ways.

Boulder is very hiking and biking friendly and they encourage "green" living and thinking. People in Boulder tend to park their car and walk, bike or use mass transit. All commercial venues MUST recycle and I'm pretty sure that this applies to residents. My daughter just moved there.

If this is important to you I'd move. Colorado Springs definitely isn't the place to be for green living. I went there to the national forest outside Pikes Peak to camp and most of the campsites were full of garbage with yahoos driving around in pickup trucks going too fast down dirt roads. If you are looking for green living you want to the wrong place.

Here in the mountains it's middle of the road. The resort I work for is puts a percentage of their profits into the environment and is very proactive about recycling. We have recycle bins all over town and the stores charge to use plastic bags and have free bus service. I love that aspect a lot. I recycle and use my own bags and bicycle or take the bus. I only use my car to drive out of town.

What I don't like is that many places haves the sprinklers run EVERY DAY in the summer. It's not needed. It rains here EVERY DAY. Sometimes I see them on when it's raining and we have rivers of water in the parking lot! In a state that complains about lack of water I find that illogical and irritating. I saw the same thing in coastal California last summer. It would be damp and foggy every morning and they'd have the sprinklers on! In state that was supposedly in a drought! IMO if a state that has a water shortage doesn't naturally have grass and wouldn't have it without a sprinkler system then it shouldn't be there.

Last edited by Freak On a Leash; 08-15-2017 at 11:10 AM..
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Old 08-15-2017, 11:18 AM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,950 posts, read 20,207,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xeric View Post
Most homes didn't have AC in the 1980s and now they do. So per-capita electricity use has risen.
Looked at data from EIA.gov
Per capita electricity use has been constant from 1990 to 2014.
Could not find older data.
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Old 08-15-2017, 12:27 PM
 
1,314 posts, read 1,728,178 times
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Quote:
If this is important to you I'd move.
When money dictates your housing choices, sometimes you have to settle for a place that isn't quite so progressive as some other cities. But I will continue to recycle, pick up other's trash and limit water use because it seems like a more intelligent choice than ignoring altogether. It is interesting how air conditioning is becoming a necessity for so many on the front range. Has it gotten hotter or have people gotten more used to being constantly comfortable?
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Old 08-15-2017, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Breckenridge, Colorado
59 posts, read 32,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orngkat View Post
It is interesting how air conditioning is becoming a necessity for so many on the front range. Has it gotten hotter or have people gotten more used to being constantly comfortable?
For me, it's too hot in the front range. My daughter lives in Boulder and I sweat constantly while I'm there. Here at 10k feet I put the heat on some days. Air conditioning isn't an issue. I open the window but it rarely gets into the 80s.
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