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Old 09-01-2017, 01:18 PM
 
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LoveBoating - what was your 28-mile commute like?
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Old 09-01-2017, 01:18 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^Here's a good definition of the Front Range. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Front_Range
"The Front Range is a mountain range of the Southern Rocky Mountains of North America located in the central portion of the U.S. State of Colorado, and southeastern portion of the U.S. State of Wyoming.[1] It is the first mountain range encountered moving west along the 40th parallel north across the Great Plains of North America. The Front Range runs north-south between Casper, Wyoming and Pueblo, Colorado and rises nearly 10,000 feet above the Great Plains. Longs Peak, Mount Evans, and Pikes Peak are its most prominent peaks, visible from the Interstate 25 corridor. "

Then there's this (same link):
"The name "Front Range" is also applied to the Front Range Urban Corridor, the populated region of Colorado and Wyoming just east of the mountain range and extending from Cheyenne, Wyoming south to Pueblo, Colorado."

The latter is what most people mean when they say "The Front Range". Cities along the Front Range are (north to south): Cheyenne, Ft. Collins, Loveland, Longmont, Boulder, Denver, Colorado Springs, Pueblo and all their suburbs. Generally these are cities along I-25, though Boulder is not. Boulder is, however, closer to the real Front Range than any of these cities except for Colorado Springs (which is also on I-25). Got that? You'll get it eventually if you move here.

The cities you mentioned are all suburbs, and all but Englewood are >100,000 people. Aurora has about 300,000.
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Old 09-01-2017, 02:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mmt52 View Post
LoveBoating - what was your 28-mile commute like?
This was back in Spring 2004 thru Fall 2007. CDOT had widened the I-25 by the old tire factory and that really helped with traffic. Another thing that helped me was I started work at 7AM and got off at 3:30PM. I'd leave our house, off of Hilltop in Parker, at 6:15 or little after. Back then, the population of Parker and Denver metro, was lower.
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Old 09-01-2017, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post

"Blizzards" are not quite the same here as I experienced in Illinois. We don't even get a big dump every year. (Now my punishment for saying that will be that we get 2 or 3 this year.)
Remember that folks. The blizzards this winter can all be traced back to Katarina!
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Old 09-01-2017, 09:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MsMetal View Post
I've lived many different places. The one I was comparing CO with was Mpls/St. Paul. In most of the others, I was a kid. I also lived in the Cleveland burbs for many years & rural MD for 2. I remember when I first moved to Mpls, at around age 15-16, that the kids were incredibly friendly. I was used to moving every 2 yrs, so it had been very difficult to make friends & the Mpls burb kids definitely stood out. It was the first time in my life people came & introduced themselves to me & it was in stark contrast to MD.

WHen I think harder about it, I def developed some close friendships in Mpls, particularly with friends at work. Some of those have actually been lifelong friendships. At our last house there, the neighbors all decided to get to know each other & do something together a few times a year. Which was very nice & very social, on the surface, but I never felt like we really knew any of them except on a superficial level or that they could be called in an emergency.

Even before I moved to CO, I spent a lot of time in Denver on business, with different clients & I was always struck by how friendly they were. I traveled all over & only in Denver, did the clients frequently invite us out after hours, invited us to concerts & dinners or out for drinks with a group & they struck me as so genuine. I remember visiting Denver & being at Costco with an employee of mine & his wife & the whole vibe was just different, strangers kept starting up convos, insisting we go in front of them in line, that kind of thing. The guy I was with though, he was that kind of guy, so maybe he attracted it.

I will say that I've had to worker harder here b/c we moved here only knowing 1 person & we have no kids & work at home, so it's been very difficult to meet people. So, I had to really work hard & make a concerted effort to make friends & maybe that's why I view them as deeper, more real friendships? Perhaps it's simply b/c I worked so hard for it. I never had to work to make friends in Mpls.

IDK, it all boils down to personal experiences & perspectives. My experience was just different than yours, that's all. Certainly not questioning yours :-)

Some good points. We've not had a difficult time establishing relationships and have certainly made some good friends here, particularly our neighbors, who are all wonderful and very friendly. In fact, we've had a very easy time meeting them and becoming engaged in the community.

By contrast, since the OP mentioned he's from the Midwest originally, my original point was really more in reference to (in my opinion) the lack of friendliness day in and day out in places such as on the street, in the market, etc, which isn't the same here as "Midwest nice". Lots of people might not find that important, but I do find a noticeable difference. At the same time, there's a nice balance with a lack of people being in your business and being laid back.
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Old 09-02-2017, 04:49 AM
 
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Originally Posted by EastwardBound View Post
Some good points. We've not had a difficult time establishing relationships and have certainly made some good friends here, particularly our neighbors, who are all wonderful and very friendly. In fact, we've had a very easy time meeting them and becoming engaged in the community.

By contrast, since the OP mentioned he's from the Midwest originally, my original point was really more in reference to (in my opinion) the lack of friendliness day in and day out in places such as on the street, in the market, etc, which isn't the same here as "Midwest nice". Lots of people might not find that important, but I do find a noticeable difference. At the same time, there's a nice balance with a lack of people being in your business and being laid back.
Both wife and I were raised in "small town" environments, especially me, in a farming community. We both have come to miss that smaller environment. Where we are now, the population is over 850,000. Way to high for us! We almost moved to Strasburg, CO in 2004, but the house had to many repairs to be done and the distance to our jobs was way to far. However we did like the area. Wound up in Parker.
We don't mind the "in your business" thing.

Big cities, like Denver, people just aren't that friendly due to crime. Thing is, big cities are where the good salaries/benefits are. But when retirement comes, like wife and I, salaries/benefits aren't needed anymore.
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Old 09-02-2017, 08:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LoveBoating View Post
Both wife and I were raised in "small town" environments, especially me, in a farming community. We both have come to miss that smaller environment. Where we are now, the population is over 850,000. Way to high for us! We almost moved to Strasburg, CO in 2004, but the house had to many repairs to be done and the distance to our jobs was way to far. However we did like the area. Wound up in Parker.
We don't mind the "in your business" thing.

Big cities, like Denver, people just aren't that friendly due to crime. Thing is, big cities are where the good salaries/benefits are. But when retirement comes, like wife and I, salaries/benefits aren't needed anymore.
I can relate! I was raised in a small farming community in Missouri of under 1000. Gradually moved to larger areas, St Louis and Kansas City, and then abroad to Seoul, Korea for several years before making the move to LA for a few years. We feel very lucky to be in a smaller environment like Loveland, where the pace is a bit slower, yet we are close enough to modern amenities and especially outdoor recreation, which is of utmost importance to us.

I'm not going to continue beating the bush about the 'friendliness' issue-that can be a revolving door, as it really is largely a matter of personal experience and feeling. We spend very little time in Denver-thankfully, but I have found most of the state to be the same with regards to that and I feel a large part of that is the fact that there are so many newcomers, which does tend to lend itself to fewer personal connections in a way. I will go ahead and express that I also think the so called 'progressive' faction moving in, particularly from places being rendered unaffordable such as California tends to be on the less friendly end of the spectrum, from my own personal experience.
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Old 09-03-2017, 07:27 AM
 
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One thing I've found out, a person has to be "friendly" in order to somtimes meet new people. I'm a "friendly" person, but, at the same time, I'm good at knowing who to be friendly with and who not to be.

There are social events, or even church, where "friendly" people can meet others who are "friendly".
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Old 09-03-2017, 09:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by EastwardBound View Post
I can relate! I was raised in a small farming community in Missouri of under 1000. Gradually moved to larger areas, St Louis and Kansas City, and then abroad to Seoul, Korea for several years before making the move to LA for a few years. We feel very lucky to be in a smaller environment like Loveland, where the pace is a bit slower, yet we are close enough to modern amenities and especially outdoor recreation, which is of utmost importance to us.

I'm not going to continue beating the bush about the 'friendliness' issue-that can be a revolving door, as it really is largely a matter of personal experience and feeling. We spend very little time in Denver-thankfully, but I have found most of the state to be the same with regards to that and I feel a large part of that is the fact that there are so many newcomers, which does tend to lend itself to fewer personal connections in a way. I will go ahead and express that I also think the so called 'progressive' faction moving in, particularly from places being rendered unaffordable such as California tends to be on the less friendly end of the spectrum, from my own personal experience.
Regardless where they moved from, I agree with this statement! So-called progressives are some of the most judgmental, narrow-minded people I have ever encountered. If someone does not follow their beliefs, that person is dismissed as being inferior, "not one of us," or whatever tired old label they can slap on to rationalize devaluing their opinions.

I conside that just another form of clique, but one parading as politically correct. Hypocrites.
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Old 09-03-2017, 09:31 AM
 
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We left So California because we weren't nearly as "open-minded" to everything there as a lot of folks were. It's pretty "open-minded" here as well and we don't like it.

There are just certain thing that we don't agree with. And, when we are pushed into accepting something, we'll disagree even more. That's why there are different areas of the U.S. that we can't live in, shouldn't live in and won't live in.
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